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Photography QnA: The Dark Room & Hints - Developing & Printing

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Category: All About Photography : Traditional Film Photography : The Dark Room & Hints - Developing & Printing

Discovering the dark room & hints about developing and printing your photographs in this helpful Q&A discussion.

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Photography Question 
maeve 

member since: 1/12/2005
  1 .  Ins and Outs of Slide Film
I know this might sound like a silly question, BUT when shooting on slide film what exactly do you get back from the photo lab when your roll of film is developed?

1/12/2005 7:33:45 AM

Kerry L. Walker

member since: 12/21/2004
  You get mounted slides.

1/12/2005 8:58:52 AM

John Sandstedt
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/8/2001
  Slide film is called "positive" film, because, as Kerry said, you get the actual results in the form of slides you look at via a slide viewer or projector.
Many folks - amateur and pro alike - feel that the best results can be achieved with slide film. In many ways I agree - great color, sharpness, etc. However, your exposure must be "right on" when using slide film.
Generally, with negative film, there is a fairly wide exposure latitude. You might have up to nine stops, based on lighting, etc. Typically, you can over-expose up to about 3 stops, under-expose up to 5 stops. That's a very wide range. Of course, you need to experiment and check your results for the exposure you like.
With slide film, you can generally use 1/2 stop over and 1 stop under. So, you can see that there is less exposure latitude with slide film. You must try to be "right-on" the first time.
One of the nice things about slide film is that, because you get slides (also called transparencies), you can really get great results when you try bracketing.
When you bracket using negative (print) film, always bracket by at least one full stop (over and under). That's because, with most of today's computerized printing processes, the computers will try to "correct" the small differences of, say, 1/2 stop bracketing. In other words, you may not be able to see the effect. Always alert your photo-finisher to the fact that you've bracketed exposures when you use print film.
Hope this helps.

1/13/2005 6:51:15 AM

Michael H. Cothran

member since: 10/21/2004
  "Normally" you get back mounted slides, assuming you are shooting 35mm. However, some better film labs will give you back the processed roll of film uncut and unmounted if you so desire. Some will give you the option of plastic or cardboard mounts, numbered or un-numbered, etc.

1/13/2005 11:17:37 AM

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Photography Question 
Leesa White
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/22/2003
  2 .  Negative From Print
I have lost a negative to a VERY important print. I have the print. Is there any way a negative can be made from it? I need a negative to submit for publication of the print. Any help would be very much appreciated!
Thanks.

11/12/2004 11:25:56 AM

Vince Broesch

member since: 6/5/2004
  It can still be done the old way, which is to have a lab put it on a copy stand and take a picture of it. But these days, there are better ways. You can have a pro lab do a high-resolution scan, do any necessary digital clean-up, and then output to a film recorder to make a new neg.
Vince
www.PhotoAgo.com

11/12/2004 3:33:13 PM

Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member
cammphoto.com

member since: 7/17/2003
  I think your only alternative is to have the print re-photographed on a copy-stand type setup with a fine-grain film ... preferably with one of a larger format.
A pro lab can do a better job at this than you could probably do yourself but some loss of image clarity and detail is un-avoidable.
You might want to inquire if a transparency would be acceptable. You could have one made using the above process with a slide film, and have one less "generation" of loss in clarity than a negative which has to be re-printed ...just a thought.

11/12/2004 3:47:21 PM

Leesa White
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/22/2003
  Thanks, Bob and Vince,
I will definitely look into those options. Thanks so much for the quick response!

11/12/2004 3:53:40 PM

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Photography Question 
Cassandra E. Davis

member since: 10/15/2004
  3 .  How to Work in My Darkroom
Last year I bought darkroom equipment, because it had always been my dream to have my own darkroom. However, after countless tries of making a clear print I have had no success. The most I get is a shadow of the pic ... it usually turns out a dark purple. I have played with the times, but it always comes out the same. Is it possible I received some bad chemicals with my darkroom set? I have no idea what I should do. I don't even know where to get chemicals or which chemicals go with which type of paper. Can someone please help me out?

10/15/2004 8:58:46 AM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  Is this black and white or color printing?

10/15/2004 2:58:29 PM

Cassandra E. Davis

member since: 10/15/2004
  Black and white

10/15/2004 7:08:46 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  Where to get them: Look in the phone book Yellow Pages under photo supply/retail.
What to get: Kodak polycontrast black & white and Ilford black & white are good papers - simple to use. They are good for beginners but not so basic that they aren't good for anything else. (There are some that are categorized as fine art, but other types still make good prints.)
Chemicals can be bought at places that sell paper, usually. If there are no stores nearby, then try online - like Adorama.com
Why they're purple, could be old chemicals and/or old paper. A purple tint makes me think it's mainly the chemicals, but the developer turns dark when it's getting old, like tea. Are they turning the purple color in the developer, or does it start to do it when it gets in the fixer?
One test to do: Put a section of paper straight out the box in the developer and see if it stays white. And also, try it without the safelight on, stick in a section and wait awhile, then turn the safelight on and see if it starts turning purple after the safelights turned on.
Third test: Stick in a section in the fixer, wait a few minutes, rinse and put it in the developer with the lights on, and see if it turns dark. That's a way to test fixer strength, that's if you don't have a bottle of fixer tester. That you just add a couple of drops to your fixer and if you get a white precipitate (white solid forms) means your fixer needs to be replaced.

10/15/2004 10:56:59 PM

Norbert Maile

member since: 7/28/2004
  Go to Ilfords web site and register with them on their ILFPRO Club. When you do that, they will mail you a free book which will soon become your printing and developing bible. It will show you the difference in developers, papers,film etc. etc. Then it will not be a frustration anymore, but a pure pleasure. Once you get the hang of it you can switch to Kodak products if you want. Norbert

10/19/2004 7:00:52 AM

Doug  Elliott
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/18/2004
  Cassandra,
Gregory, and Nobert have some great ideas. Now concerning your unsharp images. I would like to suggest you go into your darkroom, at the normal time you print and set down a chair. Turn the lights off and sit down. Wait five minutes and look arond to see if you have any light leeks. If you don't keep your lens cap in place and turn on your enlarger. See if you have any light leeks from it. A thought here, what color are your walls. A good dark room has flat black walls. Fix all your light leeks. You can use a black "gaffers" tape for this. Last turn off your enlarger and turn on your safe-light. Do you have any light leeks? What kind of unit is it? Is it new or used. IF it is used did you change the filter? What wattage of light bulb are you using? In addition check the optics in your enlarger to make sure they are in the correct place, and take out your enlarging lens and check the front and rear elements for finger prints. Clean the lens.
Hope these ideas help.
Good Shooting.
Doug

10/19/2004 6:47:23 PM

Doug  Elliott
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/18/2004
  Cassandra,
Gregory, and Nobert have some great ideas. Now concerning your unsharp images. I would like to suggest you go into your darkroom, at the normal time you print and set down a chair. Turn the lights off and sit down. Wait five minutes and look arond to see if you have any light leeks. If you don't keep your lens cap in place and turn on your enlarger. See if you have any light leeks from it. A thought here, what color are your walls. A good dark room has flat black walls. Fix all your light leeks. You can use a black "gaffers" tape for this. Last turn off your enlarger and turn on your safe-light. Do you have any light leeks? What kind of unit is it? Is it new or used. IF it is used did you change the filter? What wattage of light bulb are you using? In addition check the optics in your enlarger to make sure they are in the correct place, and take out your enlarging lens and check the front and rear elements for finger prints. Clean the lens.
Hope these ideas help.
Good Shooting.
Doug

10/19/2004 6:47:24 PM

Doug  Elliott
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/18/2004
  Cassandra,
Gregory, and Nobert have some great ideas. Now concerning your unsharp images. I would like to suggest you go into your darkroom, at the normal time you print and set down a chair. Turn the lights off and sit down. Wait five minutes and look arond to see if you have any light leeks. If you don't keep your lens cap in place and turn on your enlarger. See if you have any light leeks from it. A thought here, what color are your walls. A good dark room has flat black walls. Fix all your light leeks. You can use a black "gaffers" tape for this. Last turn off your enlarger and turn on your safe-light. Do you have any light leeks? What kind of unit is it? Is it new or used. IF it is used did you change the filter? What wattage of light bulb are you using? In addition check the optics in your enlarger to make sure they are in the correct place, and take out your enlarging lens and check the front and rear elements for finger prints. Clean the lens.
Hope these ideas help.
Good Shooting.
Doug

10/19/2004 6:47:26 PM

Norbert Maile

member since: 7/28/2004
  Good point. Your equipment has to be good. As for the darkroom, I once had one in the basement of an old house. My walls were old dark,(not black) bedsheets mostly for dust control. Slight light leakage from under a door is ok for paper as long as the safe light out powers it, but not negative development. You need total darkness for that like a changing bag. The pics were tac sharp. Remember that Ansel Adams did it on his dinning room table under a blanket, (developing that is). Norbert

10/20/2004 6:06:50 AM

James Scott Stone

member since: 4/28/2008
  We talk about light leak in,or it might check water temperture is set right for rigt film be used. I rember this from my college instrustion. Scott Stone.

5/2/2008 9:31:52 PM

Alan N. Marcus

member since: 3/4/2006
  Hi Cassandra,

Darkroom help:

Likely purple results are due to chemical contamination, likely iron. Another possibility is the paper has gone bad.

The rules are: Concentrated chemicals (these purchased) should be reasonably fresh and the packaging in good order. Containerís tight closed caps on tight. If the bottles are plastic, squeeze to expel excess air. Read mixing directions, follow carefully. Mixing containers, utensils, funnels, stirrers, measuring cups etc. should be plastic or glass. Metal containers and utensils are to be avoided unless stainless steel. Chemicals should appear clear to be slightly colored but always transparent.

Mix to make a stock solution (intermediate concentration) at the recommended temperature. Store stock solution in glass or plastic tightly capped. Photo chemicals spoil over time due to contact with air (oxidation). Spoiled chemicals are dark. Darkened solutions function substandard and they stain film and paper. Shelf life is reduced in a partially filled bottle. Add marbles or squeeze plastic to expel air.

Photo papers expire after a time, so use fresh paper. Refrigeration extends shelf life. Two general types of paper are commonly sold. Enlarging paper, a higher speed paper used in conjunction with the enlarger. Contact paper, a slower speed paper used to make contact prints. While it is possible to interchange, I donít advise a beginner to attempt.

Mix stock solutions to make a working solution. Note solution color and inspect making sure all ingredients have properly dissolved. If your water source is suspect, use bottled water throughout. Iron is a common contaminate in public water sources. Discard working solutions after the session. Use glass, plastic, or stainless trays.

Check dark room integrity. With lights off, lay a sheet of paper on the work area. Place a coin on top. Add a coin, every minute, continue for 10 minutes. Develop the paper in the normal way. If light leaks are present you will see outlines of the coins. If leaks are detected, patch it up.

If you continue to have problems, supply details as to chemicals and paper being used and you printing equipment, also more about trays and utensils being used.

Alan Marcus (marginal technical gobbledygook)
ammarcus@earthlink.net

5/3/2008 8:15:54 AM

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Photography Question 
Jane Crosthwaite

member since: 6/8/2004
  4 .  Best Way to Print from Velvia Slides
I live in Singapore and am really getting into photography but am very much in the learning process! We went to Bali last week and have just got back 2 rolls of slides shot with Fuji Velvia ISO100. This is the first time I have used this film and love the beautiful colours. I would like to print a few of my images but I am nervous, since in the past I have been disappointed when they were printed as they never look as good as the original slide.

Can anyone advise between printing straight from a slide and what process I should be seeking for best result (I want to enlarge some) or alternatively getting them scanned at high resolution on to a disk and then printed? The advantage for me of scanning and printing is that I can do my own cropping at home using Photoshop elements, but am unsure as to whether printing from a scanned image will give poorer results than printing from the slide direct.

I am very confused - all help will be MOST appreciated!

6/8/2004 7:37:07 PM

Brenda Tharp
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 6/9/2003
  Jane - if you want to make great prints from your slides, the Ilfochrome print process, as a traditional printing method, is great. It is a positive-to-positive process, so you don't lose sharpness like you would if you made internegatives. If you take the slides to a reputable lab, and tell them that you want the print to look like the slide, they should be able to do that for you. If you need some minor corrections here and there, it's up to you to make that clear to them, too. I used to have my slides printed this way all the time with great results.

If you go the scanning/digital printing route, there are a few things to consider:
1) Do you have a top-quality scanner (such as the Nikon 4000 or similar)? The size you want to print is a factor here - you can get good results from the Nikon 4000 scanner for up to 11x14. Drum scans are the best, but might be more than you really need at this point. The resolution is wonderful from a 100mb drum scan from a 35mm slide!
2) Do you have the Photoshop skills to make the corrections you'll need to make for contrast, color balance, sharpening, saturation, etc.? (All scans need some adjustment; it's the nature of the process.)
3) Are you using good quality papers to print on digitally - ones that match your printer specs, and have good brightness and color.

All of these factors are important to getting great results. I hope this at least clarifies the options for you. Let me know if I can be of more help, and good luck!

6/11/2004 6:44:33 PM

Jeffrey 

member since: 11/7/2002
  Jane,

Which shop did you visit?

Try RGB located at Beach Road and have them print for you. They are one of the best in Singapore.

6/15/2004 7:09:40 PM

Jane Crosthwaite

member since: 6/8/2004
  Jeffrey, I actually use RGB in Beach Road and they are the people who developed the slides and they have scanned them to disc for me. At the moment they have been scanned at low resolution but I believe if I want to make enlargements then I should have them re-scanned at high resolution?

If you are familiar with the shop then perhaps you can advise me what I should be asking them to do. Thanks for your response - it is much appreciated, especially as you are obviously in Singapore as well!

6/15/2004 10:30:42 PM

Jeffrey 

member since: 11/7/2002
  Hi Jane,

Check out this url http://forums.clubsnap.org/showthread.php?t=63274 I think this guy is using a high end scanner and the price he offered are quite good. Maybe you can try contacting him. I do not know him and have not try his service before but from what I read from some of his customers, they seems quite happy with the result. A good place to print your pictures would be over at KT Digital Imaging. They are located at 531 Upper Cross Street. I have tried their service a few times and so far I am quite pleased with their result.

If you need more info you can email me at nikonians2000@yahoo.com.sg

6/16/2004 2:59:23 AM

Jane Crosthwaite

member since: 6/8/2004
  I feel a bit bad now as I have re-read what I have written and it gives the impression that RGB Colour has been responsible for past disappointment with printing! Actually I have never had prints made by them from slides or scanned slides - this would be the first time. Before I went ahead I was just wanting to make sure if it would be best to get them printed from the slides or whether I could get the same result from printing from a scanned image. I will also check out your other recommendations but will perhaps just go for it and get a print done at RGB and see how it turns out. Thanks again.

6/16/2004 3:09:33 AM

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Photography Question 

BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/28/2003
  5 .  Printing Images on My Epson 2200
Is there a trick to printing digital images? All the labs say to hand them JPEG's at 300 DPI. So doesn't that simply mean I go into Photoshop, make everything 300 DPI, and hand it to them for printing? Or is there more to it? Do they color correct, or do I do that in Photoshop?

I am shooting at RAW, but I don't really understand what I'm doing because Photoshop just makes it a JPEG anyway. And Photoshop automatically makes everything 72 DPI. Does the same apply to me for personal printing? In other words, what is the optimum DPI for printing? My camera is 6.3 MP.

I am really struggling with my new digital situation. Also, my film images which I have scanned in do not print nicely. How can I fix that?
Thanks.

1/22/2004 8:38:14 PM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  I think you're right to shoot in raw mode. Your camera's software, or a plug-in available for Photoshop should convert raw to TIF, or enable you to edit as raw.

I think the key to your question is the Image/Image Size screen. Open one of your best shots, right out of the camera, or from a file of archives of your raw shots. Do what you have to do to avoid converting to JPEG. It's hard to tell you what because I don't know how the particular software handles raw. Raw is what the pros are using, and there's plenty of information in back issues of Shutterbug.

Uncheck Resample and check Constrain Proportions. Shots right out of digital cameras are often at 72 ppi. Enter 300 in the resolution block and PS will calculate the image dimensions for you. Alternatively, enter the long dimension you want to print (10 if an 8 x 10), and you will see the resolution that results. If it's at least 240 ppi, print it on your Epson. For my Epson, 300 ppi gives consistently good results, but 240 is usually OK, too.

As long as you have invested in an excellent camera and a pro-level printer, consider one of the Photoshop for photographers courses here at betterphoto, or a course at your community college. There'a lot to fixing brightness/contrast, color correction, sharpening, and retouching. The Articles on my web page only scratch the surface.

1/23/2004 5:28:42 AM

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Photography Question 
sarah 

member since: 5/8/2002
  6 .  Starting a Home Darkroom
Hi, I am thinking of starting a darkroom in my bathroom. I do not own the house, my mother does, and she is worried about the effect of the chemicals on the plumbing. Will there be any effects or problems with dumping chemicals down the regular drain? And if I intend to start with black and white but hope to eventually move on to color as well, what would be the best kind of enlarger to get? Thanks!

1/21/2004 11:45:31 AM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  The chemicals aren't that strong. They won't do anything to the plumbing. You'll have to worry more of developer leaving stains. You need to make sure you have enough room for everything. You may think that you can have one thing on a counter, one thing on the floor, put some trays in the bathtub. But once you actually start making prints, it can turn out to be more uncomfortable than you first expected. Doing each print by hand can take a long time sometimes. And if you have to have the enlarger on the floor, you may think it won't be much of a hassle until you start making a test print, do your final print, then find a small dust mark when you turn the lights on, then have to do it again. You can get tired of getting up and down if you can't have everything in a convenient place.

A good black and white enlarger is a condenser enlarger. There are some called diffuser enlargers, but the condenser is supposed to be better.
Brand names - I can't tell you very much about different brands. Omega and Bessler are most common. I have an old Omega, it works fine, so take what you want from that. If you want to move to color someday, you'll need a color enlarger. You can make black and white prints with a color enlarger, but not vice-versa.
But whatever you decide, if you end up buying a new enlarger, make sure you know what it comes with. As in what you need to buy separately, as in the base board, lens, negative carrier, etc. If you go in to a store or order online an enlarger, you may get handed just the enlarger head, and not even have the light bulb inside.

1/21/2004 2:21:57 PM

John  Papandreou

member since: 1/3/2004
  Hi Sarah,
I started out like you My first Enlarger was a thing called a "Pennet" It could do both 35mm and 6x6 it came with a lens and a bulb I paid $15 at a camera flea market I used 3 Cat Litter trays to develop my prints I made up a board to go over the bath in the share house I was living in. This was darkroom "1". It was fine until I joined a Camera club and found that 8x10 couldn't wouldn't win in the comp's. I was in a second Hand Shop around a year later and found a LPL 5700 Enlarger color head 75mm lens, timer and a big box of goodies for $200.00! That became Darkroom "2" I also moved into a better house with a area that I made mostly light tight and set up a work bench. I could now print 11x14 and no more filter's under the lens and I had a Nikkor 80mm lens and a 50mm 2.8 lens. The enarger also came with trays and a timer that helped alot.

I used this setup for around 3 years and could do most things I even printed color in drums(!) using Paterson chem and a thing called a unicube. Then I went to a thing called a Govenment surples Auction at that one they had lots of goodies but my eyes were on one enlarger there were 3 of them a Durst 659, Leica Focamat 3, and the big one a durst L1200 with a 150mm rodagon and 2 heads and a set extras. Well, I ended up with the L1200 for $600.00 because every one else thought it was too big! I had to transport it in bits and it came with half a Durst catalogue of extras. I sold my LPL for $200.00 but I kept the Nikkors and gave the pennet away to a friend. I set up the Durst in my make shift darkroom and found I could print up to 20x24 with very high quality. The colour head called a CLS501 is a dream to use.

I had this set up for 2 years. I now have bought my own house and am setting up a PRO style Darkroom in the shed of this house after a year or hard work I am almost complete and my wonderfull Durst is mounted with big bolts wall mount Kit and all. That is enough about what I have done.

Best enlargers are made by Durst, Saunders/LPL are also good 5700 and the 6700 are fine, any thing that can be had for $20.00 and has a lens and a Bulb would make a fine start. You can always buy something better when you have a real darkroom to put it in. Durst makes the finest Enlargers I have ever used. Most major lens makers make good lenses you will need a good 50mm lens as a start. My 50mm 2.8 Nikkor has served me for 8 years and always prints well. I hope I have been some help. It has taken me 10 years to get to this level - I am at Darkroom "6". As your printing skills improve so will your need for better Equipment. Don't buy what don't need and look at secondhand first - use the money saved on a good lens and a few boxes of paper.

1/22/2004 3:27:50 AM

Dee Rogers

member since: 8/18/2003
  Hi Sarah-
Having a home darkroom is tons of fun and can be done well on a limited space and budget. One thing I might add however is that fix does NOT go down the drain. Because of the silver in it, it's harmful to the water. No it won't explode your sink and if you pour it down most likely noone will ever know. Most places where you buy chemistry will walk you through this and you just take back the used fix and either they will recover the silver or send it someplace that will. An excellent book I found that addresses among other things setting up your darkroom is Tim Rudman's The Photographer's Master Printing Course. It includes diagrams (including several home darkroom setups) and pictures (of printing techniques) (since photographers are visually oriented people). Also Bruce Barnbaum's The Art of Photography is a good reference although perhaps a little less accesible than Rudman. One other chemistry note selenium for toning can be somewhat noxious smelling. Please feel free to touch base if you have any other questions.

Dee Rogers

1/28/2004 8:06:31 AM

Dee Rogers

member since: 8/18/2003
  PS if you want to print color seriously consider digital. Having printed both ways I will never print color again if I can avoid it. I can elaborate more if you are interested.

-Dee

1/28/2004 8:11:04 AM

sarah 

member since: 5/8/2002
  Thank you all sooooooo much. I really appreciate all the information and advice. I willl definetely be checking out some flea markets in the near future! And will also be picking up some books on the subject as well. Thanks again!

1/28/2004 11:52:14 AM

Scott Pedersen

member since: 11/18/2001
  Do you have a basement? Most basements have access to water like a spigot or laundry tub. You could cover up the windows, Have more room to work in depending on how the basement is layed out....Just a thought.

1/29/2004 5:14:30 AM

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Photography Question 
Bob 

member since: 12/23/2003
  7 .  Developing For A Beginner
Hello, I have been interested in home developing black and white photos for a while. I started to search the web, and then because I had too many questions I decided that it was just too complicated. But, I just love the way the images look and really want to have a hobby of my own - it looks so much fun!

Anyway, I am thinking of starting out with a 35mm SLR camera. People have said that those are good to start with because there are many lens options. So I have decided to start with that. Ok, I know that when developing film you use the tank for the negatives, but after that (I am sorry if this sounds like a ridiculous question) what do I do to make the actual picture? On all of the sites I have been to they have said up to the part about negatives, tanks, changing bags and then they stop... will you please help me?

12/23/2003 7:53:38 PM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  Look for the Time-Life Photography series books on Film and The Print. These go for $2 at flea markets. Kodak has good books, at serious photography stores.

12/24/2003 6:16:55 AM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  You need an enlarger, trays, chemicals, a safelight, a timer (can get by without it, but it would make it much more difficult), contrast filters, lens for the enlarger, some rubber tipped tongs come in handy.

12/24/2003 6:22:51 PM

Sara L. Tanner
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/2/2003
  Hi. I'm taking a photography course at my highschool. Gregory named most everything we have in the darkroom at school. (If you don't mind getting wet the tongs aren't neccesary). Our timer is glow-in-the-dark so we can still see it when we are working but it doesn't give off enough light to mess anything up. You will also need orthochromatic photopaper ofcourse! :)

12/29/2003 5:12:54 PM

Melanie Marchese

member since: 1/16/2003
  Depending on the area where you live, there might be Adult (Continuing) Education classes available - or a Community College nearby that offers Photography classes - I have done both and found them very helpful!

12/30/2003 3:57:44 AM

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Photography Question 
Megan E. Elder

member since: 3/3/2003
  8 .  Dark Room Troubles
The dark room is really getting me down. I've been shooting digital pix for over a year now, but I am currently employed at a publication using film. It's simple black and white processing, but I can't seem to get my negs to turn out. Three times now I'll run film through the chemicals but the negs come out completely clear. It looks like I exposed them, but I'm pretty sure I didnt. Could there be a problem with my chemicals? They've been in that cabinet for at least 4 months. Do they stop working or something? What am I doing wrong!?

9/22/2003 5:43:22 PM

Sarah R. Gipson

member since: 9/23/2003
  That has happened to me a lot of times and it always had to do with my camera. It would just act like it was taking my pictures but it didnt. so I went and got my camera fixed and now it works. If they the chemicals are sealed with a lid, they should still be ok. also just make sure that you dont have any light coming in. but just to be safe, I would try out new chemicals

9/23/2003 8:30:12 AM

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Photography Question 
Karrie Smith

member since: 3/5/2003
  9 .  Darkroom - Doing Your Own Developing
I am interested in learning to do my own developing as a hobby. Are there any good websites on how to develop black and white and colour? I was already given a great wedding guide on John Lind's web site.

7/16/2003 10:09:35 AM

Maynard  McKillen

member since: 3/5/2003
  Dear Karrie:
www.photoslave.com
www.photogs.com/bwworld/bwforum.html
nothingspecial.itgo.com/bwphoto
for starters.
You might try a search with a string like "Black and White Darkroom Website".

7/17/2003 6:46:41 AM

Jim Miotke
BetterPhoto Member
BetterPhotoJim.com
Owner, BetterPhoto.com, Inc.
  Hi Karrie,

I also wanted to make sure you already saw our articles on the subject:

How to Develop Your Own B&W Film by Chris Groenhout
How to Build Your Own Darkroom by Chris Groenhout
Why Shoot Black and White by Yours Truly.

Enjoy and best wishes on your new endeavor!

7/22/2003 8:44:51 AM

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Photography Question 
Marcie C. Dunmire

member since: 11/6/2002
  10 .  3 complimentary colors of color printing
what are the 3 complimentary colors used in color printing?

11/6/2002 4:04:58 PM

Pamela J. White

member since: 11/15/2002
  Magenta, Cyan, And Yellow. Cyan is a bluish color, the reason I say that is because I always thought cyan was brown... So there you have it.

11/15/2002 11:22:52 PM

Amy 

member since: 6/17/2003
  thanks for the info - needed the info for a question on a job application

6/17/2003 9:16:32 PM

Lindsey R. Skaggs

member since: 6/13/2005
  Was it for Ritz camera shop? I googled this and needed the same question for a job application! Wow, that is so cool.

6/13/2005 8:14:55 AM

John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/27/2001
  This question has been asked here periodically for some years now and whenever it's revealed why the question was asked, it's always "Ritz job application."

I'm getting this visualization that Ritz must have hired the old, toothless, haggard, grimy troll from Scene 24 in a rather notorious 30 year old British movie to screen job applicants, and that he's still repeating the script from a later scene in which he unexpectedly reappears near the end:

"What is your name?"

"What is your quest?"

"What are the three complementary colors?"

-- John Lind

6/14/2005 12:00:19 AM

Christopher A. Vedros
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/14/2005
  Good one, John. I was wondering if there were any Python fans around here. Have you seen the parrot in my gallery?

6/15/2005 12:50:15 PM

John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/27/2001
  I have now. Nicely done.

This wouldn't be the very same parrot from Starship Titanic would it? Or perhaps it's the poor Polly that was resurrected in Lazarus manner by the shop keeper *after* the film crew stopped (or ran out of film)?

Correct answer to question number three:
"Additive or subtractive?"

-- John Lind
[who has to know these things]

6/15/2005 5:37:24 PM

John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/27/2001
  More seriously . . .
For the question asked about printing (color prints), and what Ritz is looking for, it's the negative colors mentioned above: cyan, magenta and yellow. In a print, they're "subtractive" as all three together create black, which is the complete absence of color.

FYI, the positive colors red, green and blue. These are what your computer monitor uses.

"Subtractive" is what one gets from reflective usage of colors . . . a print or printed material, or paint on a canvas. "Additive" is what one gets when they're used to illuminate or are used in a luminous manner . . . colored lamps used to light up a building or monument, slide projection, television screen, computer monitor, etc.

-- John Lind

6/15/2005 11:20:37 PM

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