Untitled

Susan Reynolds Student 9/8/2009 10:06:10 PM

Love the yellow snail! I've never seen one this color before. He sure stands out from the rock wall with that coloring!
Have you tried cropping in tighter to put more emphasis on the snail?
Great capture! :) #1178219

Peter W. Marks 9/9/2009 3:57:26 AM

Thanks, Susan. I understand what you say about cropping but that would not give me what I intended.
Most artists prefer that the viewer decides for him/herself what their art represents. They want the viewer to go way beyond the "pretty picture" way of thinking. This was a vertical climb up the rock face and when I spotted the snail it immediately reminded me of those scary images one sees in National Geographic of mountain climbers clinging precariously to the overhangs of some rarely climbed mountain in the Andes. And look! Mr Snail has no safety ropes!
Pete #7927743

Susan Reynolds 9/10/2009 12:20:05 AM

Go Mr. Snail! Love your explanation for the composition :) #7930632

Meghan Gonski 9/16/2009 11:54:46 PM

I'm suprised no one besides Susan has given comments on this photo.
I love the yellow and have not seen it before either but that is not saying much because I haven't seen many snails in my lifetime! :)
I agree with your composition Peter. I thought the same thing as before. I also think the little worm thing is either dinner or rooting the snail on his climb. How big was the rock to you though? #7949802

Peter W. Marks 9/17/2009 3:56:46 AM

Good morning and thanks Meghan.
This was shot at Trebah gardens in Cornwall, this summer. The rock was about four feet high and I think you are right, Mr Snail had his eye on that red thingy which I didn't notice until I had the image on the monitor. As this rock bordered a pathway through these sub-tropical public gardens with a vast variety of plants I would be surprised if it was dinner. I think it was a Mount Everest moment. Just climb it because it's there and he was receiving encouragement from the worm!
Have a great day Meghan. Pete #7950330

Meghan Gonski 9/20/2009 12:58:09 AM

Thanks for telling me 'bout that.
I thought of you Pete as I weeded my garden I found a teeny tiny snail attached to an old flower marker. It was so small just like your photo here, not the pretty yellow but a brown that matched the earth. anyways it made me think of you. :) #7957613

Dianna Murphy 10/7/2009 8:09:21 AM

Congratulations on this photo being featured in today's photoflash newsletter. #8016235

Sharlene Davis 10/7/2009 8:10:59 AM

I understand your ideas behind the composition and love the comparison between the snail and mountain climbers - but I don't think that you quite pulled it off. Without the explanation I would have never guessed that the snail was even climbing - the composition makes it appear that you simply took a shot of the ground. May I suggest that perhaps you should have taken the picture from a side angle so that the viewer could better understand your intentions from the very first glance and get a better view as the snail clings to the rock. This would even better illustrate the snail as a climber since almost all renown pictures of climbers are also from a side angle rather than straight on to emphasise the verticality and struggle of the climb. #8016246

Peter W. Marks 10/7/2009 11:01:22 AM

Thank you both so very much. I appreciate your time.
I do understand what you say Sharlene and now should come clean.
When I came across this snail I admit my first thought was not about climbing a mountain as such. What I did think was "Buddy, there's got to be an easier way to get to the other side than climbing directly up." I quickly shot the image and then got out of the way of the other folk waiting to pass me on the very narrow path with a near vertical drop-off to one side. It was only a little later on the walk that I sat on a log and browsed back through a card full of images. It was then that in my mind's eye I likened it to a mountain climber.
Thanks again ladies. Pete #8016687

Meghan Gonski 10/22/2009 5:52:33 PM

Pete you seem to take a lot of photos in "very narrow busy paths" hahaha
Sharlene does have a good point of opinion. I still like yours the way it is though #8060001

To discuss, first log in or sign up (buttons are at top center of page).

Description



Exif: F Number: 6.3, Exposure Bias Value: 0.00, ExposureTime: 1/320 seconds, Flash: did not fire, compulsory flash mode, ISO: 200, White balance: Auto white balance, FocalLength: 116.00 mm, Model: Canon EOS 20D

Uploaded on 9/2/2009 2:43:58 PM


Copyright for this gallery photo belongs solely to Peter W. Marks. Images may not be copied, downloaded, or used in any way without the expressed, written permission of the photographer.
Contact photographer via gallery.
Log in to follow or message this photographer or report this photo.