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Photography Question 
Wendy Wyatt
shootinstarphoto.com
 

Shooting on the Las Vegas Strip


I'm doing a shoot down on the Las Vegas strip, and I haven't done much night photography. Wondering if anyone could impart me with wisdom before going out. Tips or tricks of the trade would be much appreciated.


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12/30/2009 7:51:06 AM

 
Peter K. Burian
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PeterKBurian.com
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  Wendy: I have done a lot of shooting there; you can see some of the photos at www.peterkburian.com
The basic approach. Set the camera to P mode. That will allow you to set the ISO. Set the ISO to 800.
A tripod is not practical on a busy streets, but the camera will often provide an adequately fast shutter speed, when it's set for ISO 800.
Also try bracing the camera against something solid like a light post. To minimize blurring from camera shake.
After that, it's all in the composition.


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12/30/2009 2:42:26 PM

 
Carlton Ward
BetterPhoto Member Since: 12/13/2005
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  Hi Wendy,
I have done some shooting there and agree with Peter. I have also used a tripod when shooting the falls in front of the Mirage and I also like to shoot from up high like a hotel room or many other places to get a different view. Extreme wide-angle shots in front of 4-Queens and other places with distinctive entrances can make the beautiful signs look really cool. I sometimes even lay on the ground and shoot up to get some different points of view. Have fun!


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12/31/2009 2:17:25 AM

 
Christopher Brown
cbrownimages.com
  Hi Wendy
I agree with all that has been said. I would add to Peters point. I use a
small table top tripod from Bogen.
It has a small ball head and I am able to brance the camera against a tree, or a telephone pole, a building or my chest to steady the camera. I t works
well for low light situations.


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1/19/2010 8:54:05 AM

 
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