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Photography Question 
Roberta Davis
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/10/2003
 

Orange-tinted Pictures


Some of my indoor photos in lower light are turning out a bit orangy... Can someone assist? Thanks!


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10/14/2007 7:41:00 PM

 
Justin G.
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/13/2004
  It's simply a white balance problem, since different light sources emit a different temperature of light. The human eyes are remarkable in that it sees most light sources as white light. Daylight (sunlight) has relatively even red, green, and blue wavelengths. Fluorescent lights are high in green wavelengths and tungsten lights are high in red wavelengths of light. What this means to you is that when you're taking pictures indoors that are primarily lit by tungsten lighting (incandescent lighting in which a filament is heated to create the light), this will give a red/orange glow on your images if your camera (or film) thinks it is seeing white daylight (or sunlight). If you are using a digital camera, search your camera manual for the White Balance setting and change it to the one that looks like light bulb when you're shooting indoors (without flash). Flash is balanced to the same as daylight (sunlight).


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10/14/2007 8:08:41 PM

 
Roberta Davis
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/10/2003
  thanks for the advice.
I'll give it a try!


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10/14/2007 8:33:17 PM

 
Roy Blinston
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/4/2005
  I agree with everything, except your comment of "Fluoro lights are high in green wavelengths". This used to be the fact years ago, however in recent times Fluoro's now come in the full gambit of colour temperatures. I recently had an electrician fit 10 banks of fluoro's in my refurbished home art studio and they are all "red base" and this can clearly be seen on any photos I take.
Some nightclubs use high red wavelength Flurors in the toilets, and when you look at yourself in the mirror whilst washing your hands your skin appears to be sun-tanned and very very red. This is more complimentary and makes for happier people - hence better sales at the bar etc.


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10/16/2007 5:21:26 PM

 
Justin G.
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/13/2004
  Roy I agree with you, but I was making a generalization. They also have daylight balanced fluorescents which we use in the print-processor room so we can carefully gauge our prints.

But you're average Joe fluorescents typically are green.


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10/16/2007 6:49:48 PM

 
Roberta Davis
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/10/2003
  Thank you again... much appreciated advice!


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10/16/2007 6:50:59 PM

 
Oliver Anderson
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/16/2004
  maybe your camera is suffering from jaundice????


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10/16/2007 10:43:12 PM

 
SHARON MCAULAY
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/9/2004
  Hi Roberta, If you already have the images and want to fix them, in Photoshop you can try Image-Adjustments-Color Balance, and move the yellow-blue slider closer to blue. A second option is Image-Adjustments-Photo filters, and try the various Cooling filters and adjust their density. A third option to remove an orange or yellow cast is to go to Image-Adjustments-Match Colour and click on the "Neutralize" box, then use the Density slider to adjust. You'll always get the best results if you shoot in RAW, and two excellent programmes for adjustments are Aperture and Lightroom - in both of these you simply move the "Temperature" slider to see a cooler or warmer version of your photos. Hope this helps!


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10/23/2007 1:21:54 AM

 
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