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Category: New Questions

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Photography Question 
Robyn Gwilt
BetterPhoto Member
robyngphotography.com

member since: 7/15/2005
 

Slower Shutter vs Higher F/stop?


When shooting a group in low light/shade, would you go for a slower shutter speed to gain a higher F stop? Say, 1/30s/F16? Or, rather, go for a higher shutter speed (eg 1/160 and drop to F5.6 or thereabouts)? I would use fill flash, by the way.
Thanks

1/13/2007 1:41:21 PM

 
Donald R. Curry
BetterPhoto Member
wildlifetrailphotography.com

member since: 3/2/2006
  The higher f-stop will give a greater depth of field, ensuring the entire group is in focus.

1/13/2007 6:49:23 PM

 
Mike Rubin
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/15/2004
  Depending on your lens, distance from the group and how may rows of people, you may want to concentrate on the f/stop. Most consumer-grade lenses get soft when you stop down to f/16 or more. I'm not an expert on portraits, but would try to use the f/stop that is considered the "sweet spot" for the lens you are using.

1/13/2007 7:44:40 PM

 
anonymous A. 

member since: 9/19/2005
  1/30 should be quite fast enough, Robyn, unless your group is running amok! The greater depth of field is more valuable to you in this situation.

1/13/2007 9:45:32 PM

 
Robyn Gwilt
BetterPhoto Member
robyngphotography.com

member since: 7/15/2005
  Thanks Donald and Mike - I realise the higher the F/stop number, the better chance of the whole group being in focus - but with a group of say 10 people, chances are someone's going to move slightly, or would you say that it wouldn't be that noticeable at 1/30s, and rather go for the F11 , 14, or 16 if possible?

1/13/2007 9:45:59 PM

 
Robyn Gwilt
BetterPhoto Member
robyngphotography.com

member since: 7/15/2005
  Thanks David - sorry I replied at the same time - I guess you answered the question. As getting the whole group in focus is more important.

1/13/2007 10:36:20 PM

 

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