BetterPhoto.com - Become a better photographer today!
EMAIL:
PASSWORD:
remember me:     
     


BetterPhoto Q&A
Category: All About Photography : Caring for Cameras and Equipment

To participate in the Forum, become a BetterPhoto member or Sign In.

 
Photography Question 
Stephen  Arment

member since: 5/18/2005
 

Lens Fogging in High Humidity


A very simple matter really: Is there any way to control the way a lens fogs up in high humidity? I went to the Virgin Islands last weekend and had a hard time.

5/18/2005 6:30:41 AM

 
Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  I'm going to guess that it happened because you took your camera from cool/dry indoors to hot/humid outdoors. The moisture in the outdoor air condenses on the cold lens.
When moving from cold/dry to hot/humid, put the lens (and camera) in a bag and allow it to warm up to the outdoor temperature before opening it. You don't need to do this going the other way - from hot to cool.

5/18/2005 7:15:30 AM

 
Gena A. Tussey
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/26/2005
  I photograph quite a bit of swimming and diving in the winter and going from the car to the pool is enough to make you batty! So I usually go to the public restrooms and use a hand dryer to help speed up the process. A little fan helps too, the small hand held kind but it takes longer. I have also carried my lens and camera under my coat to get used to body heat and arrived early to ensure no fogging when the action occurs. Hope this helps some...happy shooting!

5/24/2005 6:10:03 PM

 
John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/27/2001
  This has been a common problem shooting weddings in the middle of summer with temperatures and humidity both in the 90's; especially just after it has rained. Go from inside the air-conditioned church to photograph the exit (wherein the happy couple are pelted with whatever is politically correct other than rice now) and I usually have to tell them to wait a few minutes while my lens un-fogs from the condensation. As it warms up to the outside temperature, it will un-fog itself. I usually cap it before going outside and leave the lens cap on for a few minutes which minimizes the fogging.

As John Close mentions . . . there is really no other effective solution other than waiting until the lens warms up.

-- John Lind

5/24/2005 7:13:33 PM

 

To participate in the Forum, become a BetterPhoto member or Sign In.
 

Copyright 1996-2014 BetterPhoto.com, Inc. All Rights Reserved.