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Category: New Questions

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Photography Question 
Manish Issar

member since: 7/30/2004
 

Moisture Condensation on Lens Surface


Hi. I went out this morning to snap early sunrise. It was cold outside - about 39 degrees F. I snapped a few photos and came back home. I realized that inside the house that some moisture condensed on the outer surface of the camera and lens. What precautions should one take in this situation to enhance the life of the camera and lens? Any suggestions are welcome. Thanks.

10/17/2004 7:00:13 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  As soon as you come in, put the camera in a closed plastic bag until it gets to room temperature. Short trips outside at 39 degrees aren't a very big deal, so drying everything with a cloth is good enough. But if you want to be extra careful, do the bag thing.
Also, if you want, you can buy some silica packets to place in the bag.

10/17/2004 12:06:43 PM

 
David King

member since: 9/12/2004
  Manish if you live where it gets very cold during the winter and want to do a lot of winter, outdoor photography in the cold, where the cameras will be out in it for extended periods of time, then consider having them "winterized" at your local repair shop. The normal lubricant can virtually solidify after prolonged exposure to cold. Also, if the camera is a new electronic version, you can count on the batteries going fast in the cold so have extras and keep them warm.

Greg's bag trick is a good idea, use a big enough bag to give the camera some "environment" that will warm up more slowly.

David

10/19/2004 8:07:28 AM

 
David King

member since: 9/12/2004
  Manish if you live where it gets very cold during the winter and want to do a lot of winter, outdoor photography in the cold, where the cameras will be out in it for extended periods of time, then consider having them "winterized" at your local repair shop. The normal lubricant can virtually solidify after prolonged exposure to cold. Also, if the camera is a new electronic version, you can count on the batteries going fast in the cold so have extras and keep them warm.

Greg's bag trick is a good idea, use a big enough bag to give the camera some "environment" that will warm up more slowly.

David

10/19/2004 8:07:36 AM

 

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