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Photography QnA: Flash Photography

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Category: All About Photography : Photographic Field Techniques : Flash Photography

Learn about things such as hummingbird flash photography, long range flash photography, etc. in this Q&A. Or for more tips, look at Flash Photography: Balancing with Ambient Light, an article written by Jed Manwaring.

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Photography Question 
Vickie Oakley
BetterPhoto Member
vickieoakleyphotography.com

member since: 6/2/2007
  1 .  Pocket Wizard
I would like to purchase a Pocket Wizard, but do I purchase one or two? I want to trigger studio strobes that I used to trigger by infrared as well as use it with my Nikon SB 800 flashes.

5/12/2010 1:29:32 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  You purchase at least two, a transmitter and a receiver, for the regular Pocket Wizard. I think the Pocket Wizard maximum can be a transmitter and receiver, but I'm not sure, so you'll have to check. But anyway, you'll need one transmitter typically for your camera, and a receiver for each light or apparatus you want set off with the pocket wizard. If you have multiple lights, any of them can be triggered with a built-in slave, then one receiver can be all you need.

5/12/2010 3:07:19 PM

  Hi Vickie
The Wizard is a good device. It works at a longer distance than many other units. I use the cheap radio slaves made in China. I donít need much distance, so they work well for me. The last ones I purchased were about 45 dollars total for a transmitter and 4 receivers. Do a search for digital radio slave on eBay. These will work with your SB800 units, IF you plug the transmitter into the pc sync socket on your camera. There will be no automatic exposure function.
Thanks...

5/12/2010 4:04:44 PM

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Photography Question 
Julie Takamori
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/24/2008
  2 .  Using a Tripod and Wireless Release
 
  Too Dark
Too Dark
Used tripod w/wireless release. Don't know what went wrong.
© Julie Takamori
Sony Alpha A100 D...
 
  On camera timer
On camera timer
with timer on camera, a little better.
© Julie Takamori
Sony Alpha A100 D...
 
  Fix uped
Fix uped
used post fixing
© Julie Takamori
Sony Alpha A100 D...
 
I used my tripod to take a group photo. The first was a practice shot and it turned out good. The second came out dark with the wireless release, and the third is my "fix" up. Where did I go wrong?

10/19/2009 10:35:49 AM

  What mode did you shoot the 'wireless' shot in?

10/20/2009 12:48:08 AM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  The viewfinder eyepiece needs to be covered when shooting with the remote control in any autoexposure mode. Otherwise, light enters through the viewfinder and the meter reads more light than there actually is.
If your group is in deep shade with a bright background, the use of fill flash would help balance the subject and background exposures.

10/20/2009 4:37:57 AM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  P.S. While the eyepiece was uncovered when the shutter tripped using the self-timer, the exposure was locked while you were looking through the eyepiece which blocks stray light from entering.

10/20/2009 4:43:54 AM

  Hi Julie,
You have some strong backlighting in this shot and the people are in the shadow area. If you meter correctly to get the group exposed properly, you are going to have a really blown-out background.
You want to get more light on the group and a couple of speed-lights with a remote transmitter would work well for this type of shot. I have the 580EX, and a 430EX with stands and umbrellas and an STE2 transmitter. Both flashes can be set up away from the camera and triggered by the STE2 or the 580 will also work as a master flash and you can slave the 430 off the 580 but this way will require the 580 to be attached to the camera. Alien Bees or other strobes would work well for this to,o but these require AC - so the battery-powered Speedlites may be preferred.
Hope this helps!

10/20/2009 6:52:20 AM

Julie Takamori
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/24/2008
  Thanks everyone. I checked my properties & it shows the exposure going from 1/25 up to 1/160. I did forget about fill flash in the moment. It's amazing how my other photos of that morning came out a lot better-I wasn't in them. I'll review my notes on metering & back lighting.
My next family gathering is around Christmas, will be a lot better prepared.

10/20/2009 11:58:48 AM

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Photography Question 
Simone Italia
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/9/2008
  3 .  Ring Flash: What Is It?
Exactly what does a "ring flash" do?

7/25/2008 7:36:08 AM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  It provides light like any other flash. It's just that its shape has unique characteristics that give a different look than other types of flash. You can use it for fill flash and as a main light. If you've ever seen those make-up mirrors that have a light that goes all around the outside of the mirror, that's the same thing.

7/25/2008 7:41:30 AM

Oliver Anderson
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 11/16/2004
  Simone, I own a ring flash and it's great but not nearly as easy to use as I thought. I do have a red-eye issue I had to learn to combat ... never had a problem with the 22" beauty dish I own. It does provide a great look in portraits with the cool kinda shadow/halo around the entire subject. I've used both the Profoto and Alien Bee (own the AB). Not sure of your level of light knowledge/ability, but I'd say you should be at least intermediate/advanced to use it on a shoot. That being said, I shoot professionally and can't afford to shoot photos that aren't high quality when the model/agency is paying me by the hour to produce high-quality images.

7/25/2008 10:33:19 AM

Bob Fately

member since: 4/11/2001
  As Mr. La Grange points out, ring flash is another source of light. Besides giving a shadow-free type of lighting to subjects for portraiture (sometimes used in studios), smaller ring flashes (like the Sigma EM140DG) are usually used in macro photography, to afford even lighting where a shoe-mounted flash might cast shadows across the subject that's too close.

7/25/2008 10:33:55 AM

Oliver Anderson
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 11/16/2004
  you can see the smaller (Macrophotography) ringflash on CSI...easy example.

7/25/2008 11:21:40 AM

Simone Italia
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/9/2008
  Thank You.

7/25/2008 12:52:43 PM

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Photography Question 
Gretchen J. Gilkey
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/19/2006
  4 .  Purchasing a Flash and Mount Bracket
Hey BP Gang! I am looking to purchase a flash and possible mounting bracket for my Canon 20D. I am leaning towards the Canon 580EX ... any suggestions?
Thanks!
gretchen :0)

6/24/2008 1:19:40 PM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  Two thumbs up for the 580EX II. Many good brackets to choose from. With any, you'll need the OC-E3 off-camera shoe cord.

6/24/2008 2:32:00 PM

  Hi Gretchen,
I started with the 580EX and then added a 430EX and later an STE2 transmitter to allow me to set both lights at different positions away from the camera. The 580 will also trigger the 430 in a master/slave configuration. Starting with the 580EX is a smart choice.
I still don't have/use a mounting bracket because I have never found one that felt comfortable to me - but many people swear by them. I rely more on my tripod for most of my photography, but for weddings, I can see a flash mount as being very beneficial.

6/24/2008 8:26:30 PM

Gretchen J. Gilkey
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/19/2006
  Thanks for the info!!!
gretchen :0)

6/25/2008 7:09:43 AM

Bill Boswell

member since: 3/22/2004
  You won't go wrong with the "wedding bracket" from Really Right Stuff. It is a bit pricey but with the L bracket for your camera it will be very comfortable and versatile. It also gets the flash up to reduce red-eye.

7/8/2008 5:06:44 AM

Gretchen J. Gilkey
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/19/2006
  Thanks Bill!!!

7/8/2008 6:52:53 AM

  Hi Gretchen,
I have both canon 20D and 5D and use two 580EX speelights and a STE2 and that set up is like a mobile studio. You do not need mounting brackets and you have the widest degree of flexability possible. 10 stars on a rating of 10 I does not get much better than this.
Emile

7/8/2008 1:09:02 PM

Gretchen J. Gilkey
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/19/2006
  Thanks Emile!! I went ahead and purchased the 580 ex II and a bracket. Now I am working on learning to use both of them!!!
Have a great day!!! gretchen :0)

7/8/2008 1:37:01 PM

  I started with a 420EX with my Canon Elan 7E, before going into digital. I now use the 420EX as a slave and place it on a light stand, and either use the 580EX as a master in the hotshoe, or on a light stand, and if the latter, use the ST-E2 transmitter on the camera and the 580EX as another slave.

It depends what type of photography you want to do with your camera and lights.
If you want macro photography, there are two lights either of which can be used for macro, although the 24MT-EX I believe would be preferable to the MR14-EX, ring-lite, which my husband (who knows little of photography) talked me into purchasing. Macro lighting is heavy and some people put the macro lights on a bracket, which Really Right Stuff makes, and place both the lighting and the camera on a sturdy tripod.

RRS makes a variety of brackets for lighting equipment, but it depends on your interests and finances. http://reallyrightstuff.com/flash/index.html

~Bunny

7/9/2008 4:03:14 PM

  Gretchen,

If your interest is wedding or press type photography, Paul Gero has an excellent course, which will cut short your learning curve.

Paul helped me learn to use the 580EX as a slave.

Bunny

7/9/2008 4:06:31 PM

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Photography Question 
Chris Michaels

member since: 6/22/2008
  5 .  Flash Photography: Preventing Red Eye
When I try to shoot indoors with my long-range lens from any distance, I get red eye. I am unsure how to stop this. I am using a D70 with a AF Nikkor 80-200mm 1:2.8 ED lens. Thanks.

6/22/2008 7:32:54 AM

Alan N. Marcus

member since: 3/4/2006
  Hi Chris,
Red-eye has little to do with lens; either focal length (zoom position) or aperture (f/number like f/2.8 etc.). Red-eye reduction is achieved by separating the flash from the camera. To accomplish this, you will need a flash unit capable to be dismounted from the camera. Additionally, you will need an interconnecting cord, flash-to-camera sync cord, long enough to accommodate two to three feet separation.
An added benefit will be realized when the flash is dismounted, that facial shadows become more distinctive, giving an illusion of depth i.e. three dimension effect.
Other countermeasures: Use bounce flash. Flash is directed at the ceiling, this gives the necessary separation plus shadows are softened by the vast expanse of the ceiling reflection.
Your camera likely has built-in countermeasures. Red-eye mitigation is accomplished by a pre-flash. A short duration flash of low power precedes the main flash. The pre-flash is bright enough to cause the subjectís eyes to contract. With the pupils contracted to a tiny circle, the odds of red-eye are reduced. Likely your camera features red-eye reduction, check your camera manual.
Alan Marcus (marginal technical gobbledygook)

6/22/2008 12:58:30 PM

Dale M. Garvey

member since: 3/13/2006
  Turn on more lights. The SB800 has a head that can tilt and a card that you can bounce the flash from. The red eye shutter release delays when the camera take a photo. It sends a preflash so you might not get the best shot. Most photo programs have red eye removal programs. Picasa from Google is free and works great. Therre are also pens that do the same thing.

6/24/2008 6:46:08 AM

William Schuette
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2006
  "When I try to shoot indoors with my long-range lens from any distance, I get red eye."

Chris, my take would be that as you get farther from your subject, the relative distance between the flah and the lens decreases which increases the possibility of red eye. As Alan pointed out, the solution is to get the flash off the same axis as the barrel of the lens. You didn't say what flash unit you have but if it is an SB-800, it will wirelessly control other Nikon flash units so that you can use off-camera flash without wires. A super clamp from Bogen lets you attach or stand the off camera flash almost anywhere.

Bill

6/24/2008 11:00:28 AM

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Photography Question 
Jessica C.
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/30/2006
  6 .  Using Alien Bee with Nikon SB-600/D300
Hi there,
I recently upgraded from the Nikon D70 to the D300. With the D70, I would use my SB-600 on camera to trigger my Alien Bee AB400 studio strobe. This doesn't seem to work when the SB-600 is on the D300 body. The AB still fires (or looks like it does), but all I get is a black image. Help!

6/7/2008 9:07:06 AM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  The SB-600 works in i-TTL on both the D70 and D300, and fires a pre-flash for metering. The pre-flash will trigger the strobes before the shutter opens. I'm not sure why this would not be the case when using the D70. Maybe when on the D70 the SB-600 was set for M output which doesn't use the preflash, but switched to i-TTL on the D300?

6/7/2008 11:32:16 AM

Jessica C.
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/30/2006
  Thanks for responding, Jon! I used the flash in ttl mode on both the D70 and the D300 because I wanted -1 stop from camera settings. I could try setting up the flash in manual output and see if that works.

6/7/2008 11:40:00 AM

Pete H
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/9/2005
  Jessica,
Instead of wasting the bulb life of your SB, why not just use the built-in flash on the D-300 to trigger your strobes? This is what I do all the time. Unless you're using the SB for some bounce fill?
I dial down my on-board flash to 1/64th and bang away in full manual.
all the best,
Pete

6/7/2008 7:39:36 PM

David B. Coblitz
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/15/2005
  I used to have this same pre-flash problem on my Canon Rebel 350Xti. Everyone told me it was impossible to overcome; however, I found a way that may work for your situation as well. Use exposure lock to set off the preflash & your strobe before you take the picture, then just make sure you've waited till the strobe has had time to recycle it's power before shooting & the preflash will be long gone & your external flash will trigger while the shutter is open.
Dave

6/10/2008 5:26:46 AM

Jessica C.
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/30/2006
  Pete, I am using the SB for fill, and I did play around with the onboard flash and that seemed to work well.

David, Thanks for the suggestion! I will definitely try that, and it would be great to keep using the SB as fill until I can get another AB.
Jessica

6/10/2008 6:38:47 PM

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Photography Question 
RANDI SUE MANNING

member since: 5/12/2008
  7 .  Flash Photography: Stroboframes
I am in the market for a new Stroboframe but there are too many to choose from. I shoot mostly weddings with the occasional family or senior picture sessions on location. What are your suggestions? I need to be able to switch from horizontal to vertical and back quickly, and I would like it to fit on my tripod with ease. Thanks.

5/14/2008 10:57:21 PM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
  Hi Randi,
I don't use a flash bracket. Too cumbersome for fast event work (like weddings). For vertical image orientation, I use my flash gun wirelessly (IR trigger) in my left hand off-camera and simply keep it over my head (and over the camera) and pointed at the subject. It's a tried-and-tested method of operation that was already used by photo journalists in the twenties of the last century, and it works well for me.
Have fun!

5/15/2008 8:55:31 AM

  I prefer the Seigelite frame with a Lumiquest Promax system for my flash, but that's just my preference. You may want to go to a camera shop and try as many as you can and see which one feels best if you are serious about getting one. My shoulders aren't what they used to be or I'd probably go with W's suggestion.
Have fun and keep shooting.

5/15/2008 10:21:08 AM

Oliver Anderson
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 11/16/2004
  I have both Stroboframe and CB Junior (BH Photo), the CB is better in every way and I use it both vertical/horizontal with no problem ... plus, it's priced fair.

5/15/2008 4:51:54 PM

Nina Shields
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 6/27/2005
  Randi Sue, I'd suggest that you investigate the "lightsphere" by Gary Fong; it is a wonderful source of soft lighting with the ability to go from horizontal to vertical shots with ease. It's much less cumbersome than a "stroboframe" type device and provides wonderful lighting results.

5/20/2008 4:53:18 AM

Bruce A. Dart

member since: 1/7/2007
  Randi Sue,
You said you were looking for a new stroboframe, seeming to indicate that you had something before. It depends on what flash you use and largely, what you are used to and comfortable with. I have seen many other pros work at weddings with equipment that would drive me crazy! LOL. Even a little "quick flip" type of bracket would work fine. I've used them for a couple of decades doing lots of "fast event work." Some are easier to use than others. With a "quick release" bracket on the bottom it can also go on and off a tripod head easily.Working rapidly at an event you have to be careful not to pinch the cords as you flip. A trip to a camera store to actually have one in your hand before you buy is very helpful. Good luck.
Bruce

5/20/2008 5:18:27 AM

Oliver Anderson
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 11/16/2004
  That pinching of the cords is what bummed me about my Stroboframe, got my fingers a couple times and the cord once...$60 and I didn't have the backup so I had to connect direct to the hot shoe...

Nina the stroboframe is a camera/flash bracket thats aids in preventing redeye by elevating the flash away from the lens. The lightspere is a flash diffuser...professionals use both the bracket and diffuser together.

5/20/2008 8:21:05 AM

Nina Shields
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 6/27/2005
  Oliver, I've used both, just proferred the lightsphere, finding the bracket to be awkward. I'm sure it's just a matter of personal preference. I've never had any incident of red eye with the lightsphere so it has worked well for me. I guess any photographer needs to experiment and develop their own system.

5/20/2008 9:34:01 AM

Sarah Weiland Hestres

member since: 4/11/2006
  I use the stroboframe pro T and have not been happy with it. The pinching of the cord is a bummer, but also the screws seem to loosen quickly and so do the screws that are supposed to keep the whole thing together. Not great quality for the $100 it cost me.
Just my $.02 worth. I don't have a better option, but at least an advice to stay away from this one.

5/22/2008 3:28:40 PM

Oliver Anderson
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 11/16/2004
  The CB Junior is less than $100 shipped and it is the best one I've seen for under $160...there are way better ones in the $175+ range but for you a little overkill. BHphoto.com

5/22/2008 6:23:16 PM

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Photography Question 
Amanda Perin
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 11/27/2007
  8 .  External Flash for my Canon?
I would like an external flash for my Canon Rebel XT, and was hoping for some suggestions from all the professionals on BetterPhoto.com. I am a novice who is in the process of developing a portfolio, so I do not have a lot of experience with external flashes, but will need one that works best for my skill level as it develops. Thanks for your input!

4/22/2008 9:59:10 AM

  Hi Amanda,
You should probably start with the latest version of the Canon 580. While it is expensive, it does have power and auto features that make it good to use outside and in doing events. Thanks, John Siskin

4/22/2008 3:31:42 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  There are other brands that are good ones like Metz and Sunpak, but the 580 is a good one. Especially if it's dedicated to your particular model of camera. It's good enough that it's gotten to the point of taking much of the learning to estimate light levels and power ratios for some.

4/22/2008 3:56:44 PM

Matt  Armstrong

member since: 5/6/2007
  Amanda,
I think it depends on what you are using the flash for. But if your not going into to much manual and your just starting out, I would suggest going with the 430ex flash. I also have the xt and purchased the 430 not too long ago. I have never had a problem with it and I just shoot on TTL mode a lot of the time. It will save a lot of money as well, money that could go to getting a strobist kit from M-pex. Check out strobist.com and learn how to use the off-camera flash, this will make your pictures better and also increase your knowledge of how lighting works. If you find you like the external flashes on or off camera then I would suggest getting the 580. Having two flahes can do alot for pictures. But do check out strobist.com, it helps ALOT.

4/29/2008 6:11:07 AM

  Instead of having to purchase a number of flashes, as you progress, I would start with the Canon 580EX. Additionally, Canon Visionary, Paul Gero, offers an amazing course on how to use your Canon 580EX flash, which I took in December 2007 (although my interest was to learn to use it with my antique 420 EX as a master-slave unit). Paul was very helpful in that regard as well.

4/29/2008 7:41:55 AM

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Photography Question 
Linda Bukovac

member since: 9/16/2006
  9 .  Using a Pentax Flash on a Canon Camera
I would like to know if I can use a Pentax AF-360FGZ flash on a 20D camera? Thanks.

2/24/2008 9:43:34 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  If it fits the hot shoe and the contacts line up, then it doesn't have to be in a dedicated mode. If it has manual or simple auto functions, you can.

2/24/2008 11:14:01 PM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
  Hi Linda,
what Greg says is right: it CAN work. But it's a pain! The 20D is a good camera, and it deserves a matching flashgun. Why don't you have a look at Ebay for an affordable Canon Speedlite? Have fun!

2/25/2008 3:32:52 AM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  I concur. Just get a Canon-compatible speedlight. Still, the AF 360FGZ will work in its manual output (1/1, 1/2 ...) or non-TTL AUTO mode. Set the 20D for Av or M mode so that you can manually coordinate the ISO and aperture setting with the AF-360FGZ. Flash exposure compensation is possible by varying the ISO and aperture from the camera's settings. You'll have to set the speedlight's zoom manually to match your lens. Other features such as AF assist light, high speed flash sync, 2nd curtain sync, etc., will not be enabled.

2/25/2008 5:33:28 AM

Brad Wiederholt
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 12/4/2007
  You know, I just read this thread in the SnapShot newsletter, and agree that you might want to check into a Canon EX over the Pentax.

However I have to say that learning how to control the M mode on the flash is an important skill for the growing photographer. Relying solely on ETTL can be more limiting that it is freeing.

As your photography progresses, one should take the time to learn how to use third-party flashes, or use off-camera flash controlled by a PC-sync cord. This opens you up to all the possibilities of using pentax, canon, vivitar, studio lights, etc. It also opens up the possibility of more creative pictures.

The ETTL stuff is nice (I have a couple of 580's) but there are more times than not where I use them off camera and mix them up with other brands/types of lighting.

(On a side note, be careful about hooking up older equipment directly to the hotshoe. Some older equipment and flashes use higher voltages and could wreak havoc on the electronics in your camera.)

2/26/2008 7:29:22 AM

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Photography Question 
Shelley Toler
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/11/2006
  10 .  Vertical Shots Using Flash
When shooting events indoors, I tilt the head of my SB-800 and use the built-in bounce card to achieve very effective lighting. But when I move to a vertical shot, horrible shadows are created. How should the flash head be positioned for verticals? Thanks!

2/18/2008 9:22:58 AM

Kerry L. Walker

member since: 12/21/2004
  There are a couple of ways to eliminate these shadows. First, you need to understand that when you shoot in the horizontal position, the flash is above the axis of the lens and the shadows fall behind the subject where you can't see them. When you go vertical, the flash rotates to the left (or right, depending on which way you turn the camera) of the axis of the lens so the shadows will fall to the opposite side of the flash. You can either rotate the flash head up and bounce it off the ceiling (if it is white and low enough) or get a rotating bracket which will allow you to rotate the flash (or camera, depending on which bracket you shoose) so the flash stays above the camera.

2/18/2008 9:39:52 AM

William Schuette
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2006
  Hi Shelly, Another very effective way to correct this is the Gary Fong lightsphere, a round diffuser that will fit on your SB-800 and allow you to use it in either a landscape or vertical orientation.

Bill

2/18/2008 4:14:00 PM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
The Lightsphere's trade-off is that it cuts your flash's effective range and your DoF dramatically.

Kelly, another way to handle this is to use your SB800 off-camera, in your left hand, with which you hold it over your head, pointing at the subject while you press the exposure button.
It is a tried and tested method. News photogs in the twenties of last century already used it. You'll get the hang of it quickly enough.

And you will retain the SB800's full range and DoF capability...!

Have fun!

2/18/2008 4:42:40 PM

Greg McCroskery
BetterPhoto Member
imagismphotos.com

member since: 2/27/2003
  Shelley,
Try doing a web search for a site called "Better Bounce Card". It will show a short video by a fellow who shows how to make an inexpensive reflector out of materials you can get at a craft store (e.g. Hobby Lobby). They are easy to make and you will see in the video how they minimize shadows -- much more effectively than Gary Fong's 'Lightsphere'. I use them all the time for weddings and events, and every pro friend I've shown this to has started using one. Give it a try!

God Bless,
Greg

2/19/2008 1:34:17 PM

Greg McCroskery
BetterPhoto Member
imagismphotos.com

member since: 2/27/2003
 
 
  Better Bounce Card Example
Better Bounce Card Example
This is a 'Better Bounce Card' mounted on my Olympus E-300.
 
 
Shelley,
Try doing a web search for a site called "Better Bounce Card". It will show a short video by a fellow who shows how to make an inexpensive reflector out of materials you can get at a craft store (e.g. Hobby Lobby). They are easy to make and you will see in the video how they minimize shadows -- much more effectively than Gary Fong's 'Lightsphere'. I use them all the time for weddings and events, and every pro friend I've shown this to has started using one. Give it a try!

God Bless,
Greg

2/19/2008 1:35:23 PM

Shelley Toler
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/11/2006
  Thank you so much!

2/19/2008 1:44:42 PM

Nancy 

member since: 10/24/2005
  I do event shooting and I like the sturdy Stroboframe. I also use the SB800 and you will have to purchase the special sync cord for off camera shooting, depending on your camera. I have the D200.

2/19/2008 2:41:43 PM

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