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Photography QnA: Problems - Other

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Category: What's Wrong With My Photographic Technique? : Problems - Other

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Photography Question 
Betsy Drew
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/10/2003
  1 .  Battery Caught On Fire!
I had a very peculiar and scary thing happen this weekend. I was charging the battery for my Canon 10D and it caught on fire. I was gone for about and hour and when I returned, it was totally charred and had sent burning embers into the wood floor and left deep burn marks. Obviously my question is, has this ever happened to anyone else? I am planning on contacting Canon, as well.
Signed,

Scared of Recharging

8/21/2005 3:23:06 PM

Christopher A. Vedros
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/14/2005
  Was it the original Canon battery and Canon charger? Just wondering.

8/21/2005 6:10:40 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  Cell batteries have been known to explode.

8/21/2005 6:22:22 PM

Betsy Drew
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/10/2003
  I'm not sure whether it was the original battery or a replacement. I have two batteries, but they are both Canon products. I'm talking with Canon right now, and they are very concerned. I'll let you know what happens.

8/22/2005 5:44:57 AM

George Anderson

member since: 7/6/2005
  NiMH batteries can rise to a temp of 130 degrees F while being charged, and this is considered 'normal'.

But this sounds like the batteries actually exploded. This could happen to:

1) Non-rechargeable batteries that are recharged anyway

2) Any type of battery made incorrectly that caused an internal short

3) A bad battery charger. Battery chargers often charge on high, then trickle charge towards the end of the charge to reduce battery heating, with an auto shutoff. But an internal malfunction can cause the charger to provide 100% charge until the overcharged, overheated battery explodes. I always charge batteries in a concrete floored area with no flammable materials present.

8/22/2005 5:25:12 PM

Christopher A. Vedros
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/14/2005
  George, the battery in question is a Lithium-Ion rechargeable that is used in most of Canon's digital SLRs, plus many of their Powershot G series cameras. I have 2 of them. The battery and charger have been around for a long time.

I hadn't heard any credible reports of problems like this with this battery & charger, so I'm interested to hear what Canon's response to Betsy will be.

Betsy, have they asked you to send it to them so they can check it out?

8/22/2005 6:29:48 PM

George Anderson

member since: 7/6/2005
  Where've you been Chris? The current Lith-Ion battery is quite capable of explosion in terms of statistical occurrence per battery pack. Most current lithium-ion batteries need 5 or 6 built-in safety mechanisms in the form of a controller chip and thermal sensor to prevent thermal runaway and explosion. In fact, battery makers hesitate to produce lithium-ion rechargeables in standard (AA, AAA) sizes partly due to their nasty habit of exploding if not charged to exact specifications in the proper charger, or if the controller chip circuitry dies. Valence Technology and other makers have been working on a safer lith-ion battery design because of this very problem:

"'Tiger in a Cage'
When lithium-ion batteries replaced nickel-metal hydride, researchers increased the energy density (the amount of power they could pack into the space), eliminated the memory effect, and made batteries lighter. But lithium ion in most cases uses cobalt oxide, which has a tendency to undergo "thermal runaway," explains Joe Lamoreux, vice president of research and development at Valence Technology. "When you heat this material up, it (can) reach an onset temperature that begins to self-heat and progresses into fire and explosion."
Explosions and fire happen "rarely" but this problem is a "tiger in a cage" just because of the sheer number of batteries out there. Battery problems that result in fire, lots of smoke, and explosions can be caused by a short circuit, excessive heat, overcharging, or abuse."

This can happen to ANY lith-ion battery pack, especially that has been used many times. The battery itself is usually ok, but the controller chip circitry dies. Or the controller chip may not have been made correctly in the first place.

OR, it might be counterfeit:

"Canon wishes to take this opportunity to advise you of incidents we have become aware of relating to certain counterfeit lithium-ion battery packs produced and marketed by non-Canon companies to be used with Canon Digital cameras and Digital camcorders,
which lack important safety protective devices. Recently, lithium-ion battery packs produced and marketed by non-Canon companies have been found on sale, PASSING THEMSELVES OFF AS CANON GENUINE battery packs. These battery
packs closely imitate the design and shape of genuine Canon battery packs and are illegally marked as Canon products. Due to the fact these counterfeit battery packs are quite often not equipped with protective
devices [i.e. controller circuitry]satisfying basic quality standards, using or recharging these battery packs could cause your camera or camcorder to malfunction, or lead the battery packs to overheat, leak liquids, ignite or explode. This could, in the worst case, not only damage your camera or camcorder, but also result in a serious accident causing injury, such as burns or loss of eyesight. In fact, Canon has learnt of an explosion which appears to have been caused by the use of a counterfeit battery pack. Due to the risks involved in their use, we strongly urge you, for your own safety, not to use counterfeit battery packs with your Canon camera or camcorder. Please be advised that Canon shall not be liable for any malfunctions or accidents, caused by the use of non-Canon genuine lithium-ion battery packs (including counterfeit lithium-ion battery packs) in Canon products."

8/23/2005 10:01:10 AM

Christopher A. Vedros
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/14/2005
  George, I know all about the safety features that are built into batteries and chargers, and I know about Canon's warning against the dangers of using off-brand batteries.

The reason I said I'm interested in hearing Canon's response is because Betsy said these were Canon-brand products.

Just an observation - any time you talk about a danger "in terms of statistical occurrence", it usually means you're just trying to scare people. Just my opinion.

8/23/2005 11:13:03 AM

George Anderson

member since: 7/6/2005
  "I know all about the safety features that are built into batteries and chargers, and I know about Canon's warning against the dangers of using off-brand batteries."

Then why didn't you mention it before, for the benefit of all of us? I didn't know about the counterfeit Canon-branded battery packs myself.

"These battery packs closely imitate the design and shape of genuine Canon battery packs and are illegally marked as Canon products."

That's entirely different from just off-brand' - it's a battery pack that is packaged to look nearly identical to the Canon product. What if you bought one of those because it was labeled and marked as a Canon product?

"...any time you talk about a danger "in terms of statistical occurrence", it usually means you're just trying to scare people."

What are you implying? That I'm making this stuff up? That Canon products are immune to circuit chip failure, regardless of their age? The problem with Li-I thermal runaway is well known and has motivated some laptop manufacturers to revert to NiMh battery technology, while other companies are pouring thousands of dollars into non-cobalt Li-I solutions.

What do you conclude happens when the controller circuitry chip fails in a Li-I battery pack?

I could as easily say that it's been my experience that anyone who points out problems that could be construed as brand criticism is immediately jumped on by those with a heavy monetary or ego investment in the brand. But I wouldn't jump to that conclusion.


8/23/2005 12:28:17 PM

Betsy Drew
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/10/2003
  Okay, I talked to Canon and they want me to send them the charred remains of my battery and charger. They sounded concerned as they put on someone higher up the ladder pretty quickly. I read your responses and I'm wondering if the crispy battery is one of these conterfeits. It says it's a Canon, but you never know. Now I'm trying to remember where I bought it--I've bought so much this past year. Thanks for your input.

8/23/2005 6:15:05 PM

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Photography Question 
Debi Beard

member since: 10/16/2003
  2 .  Can Fingerprints Be Removed from a Negative?
I just dropped off a 35mm negative (at a very reputable lab) to have re-prints made (a 5x7 and 8x10). The lab tech told me that there were fingerprints on the negative and they would probably show up on the photo. She said they cannot be removed from the negative. Is this true?

6/3/2004 12:47:58 PM

Tom Walker

member since: 3/12/2004
  It would depend on how long the prints were there. Treat the negative as if it were a plastic eye-glass lens: Breathe on it and wipe with a very - repeat - very soft cloth. If the prints have been there for a while, the acids in skin oil may have eaten into the film, and then there is no way I know of to get them out. Maybe some of our restoration experts may have a suggestion.

6/4/2004 4:07:41 PM

Vince Broesch

member since: 6/5/2004
  If the fingerprints are on the base side (shiny), it could be cleaned. But it sounds like it's on the emulsion side(dull). Some people might say "soak it", but I don't recommend that. So the best thing is to scan it, retouch the damage, and print it digitally. That is really all you can do now.

Vince www.PhotoAgo.com

6/5/2004 2:25:58 PM

RoxAnne E. Franklin

member since: 6/26/2002
  Ah yes, the unforgivable fingerprint problem. I do alot of restoration work to remove fingerprints. I honestly am not aware of another way, other than restoration. If you have photoshop or a good scanner, you can PATIENTLY, notice I said patiently, remove the prints. A good scanner sometimes has a software program with it that removes dirt, dust and fingerprints. Mine does a somewhat ok job, but most of the time, you end up removing them by cloning in photoshop or any program that gives you the ability to fix problems. Keep in mind that some programs will fix scratches and print marks, but remove clarity all at once. if in photoshop, there are tons of ways of fixing this.
I would be glad to help you in any way I can if you want.
It's not that hard to remove them, you could give it a whirl, just requires lots and lots of patience and good eyes.

6/9/2004 8:39:18 AM

Sreedevi  Kashi

member since: 6/10/2003
  I'm used to the darkroom, so I know that negatives were washed before you got them anyway. The best way to remove any dirt from negatives is to wash them in warm water. Do this at home by laying them out in a tray, and running water through it continuously for five minutes. I like to use a second pan, like one of those grilling pans on top of it so the negatives don't fall out into the sink, but the water is able to continuously run through it.

At the end, you can take a pure cotton ball- not synthetic- and very gently wipe off both sides of the negative. Then get Photo Flo- you can get it at any photo store and it's cheap- and just put a few drops in the water and swish it around before hanging it to dry. This keeps water spots off. When hanging, make sure there are no fans or blowers running and that the room is fairly clean- not dusty. Just using clips on a clothes line is fine. Make sure the clips only touch the edges of the strip- not where there's an image.

The whole process takes five minutes, and then you just have to wait for them to dry. I usually find they're completely dry after an hour. I'd much rather do this and work with a clean neg. than have to retouch in any way. It's so much easier. I get finger oils on my negs all the time. If you have little scratches on your negs, often you can fill them in with the oil from your skin. And of course, they attract more dirt this way. There are also film cleaners on the market that will definitely get out all the fingerprints in a flash, but they all cause streaking, and then I find I end up washing them anyway, so I go straight for the washing. Just remember, when your negs are wet, they're softer, and the emulsion is softer, so it can scratch easier. You want to be really gentle with them. And if you're doing a few strips of negs at a time, just make sure you don't have them touching each other at any point that they're not in water, even if it's for a second, or they'll stick together.

If you have any questions, let me know, but I think this will end up being so much simpler for you than spending all that time trying to digitally remove it while keeping the original quality.

6/14/2004 6:16:48 AM

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Photography Question 
rhonda 

member since: 11/29/2002
  3 .  Minolta S404 batteries not lasting
We just bought a minolta s404. We've tried 2 different sets of batteries.
The battery life just lasts a few minutes and then the camera goes black and won't work. Help please.

11/29/2002 11:23:44 AM

John 

member since: 2/25/2003
  Ever e4ady NIMH batteries c/w appropriate charger suitable for
64mb on fine.I carry three sets of 4 of those batteries and have had no problems.I sometimes revert to superfine also with good results;
This is in minus 30c temperatures on occasions. John McHugh

2/25/2003 2:01:22 PM

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Photography Question 
Stacie L. Coppinger

member since: 11/24/2002
  4 .  International Library Of Photography
 
  Just Clownin Around
Just Clownin Around
Picture of my god daughter sitting on a clowns lap
© Stacie L. Coppinger
 
I submitted a Photo a few days ago to the ILP. I was sent an email a long time ago about a contest so I finally decided what the heck. For about 2 days when I entered my name it would say that my photo was not yet web ready and to check back. Now when I enter my name it comes up that my name cannot be found. Any of you know what is going on here, did this happen to any of you who have entered their contest? I am a person who has always loved taking pictures, in fact I just drive my family CRAZY, but I do feel that some are pretty good and unique. Are there any other places to enter Photography contests that you all might suggest. And for those of you who are more seasoned photographers any suggestions on getting started and working toward making it a career. Thank you all for your time and information.

11/24/2002 10:35:20 PM

John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/27/2001
  Stacie,
The subject of the ILP, what it is and what it does comes up here periodically. See a recent thread on this from a number of months ago:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=2198

The contest is conducted to collect photographs and the photographer's contact information. They periodically publish a book with the acceptable ones in it. While the photographs that are published in it are decent ones, they're not exclusively World Class. They're not that selective; anything that's not outright horrible, repulsive, highly offensive or obscene makes it into the book.

Who buys the book? They market it heavily to those who have their photographs in it. It's often called "vanity press" because nearly all copies are sold principally to those who have photographs in it. The scheme is essentially the same as the "Who's Who" books for high school and college graduates, and for a number of professions. In other words, the book is not bought to use as a reference of truly outstanding photographers. Ask your local library if they have a copy in their reference section. I'd bet dollars to donuts they don't (unless the librarian has a photograph in it).

Regarding a career, what type of photography do you want to do? What type to you like doing, or think you might like doing?

Photography as a "profession" spans a wide range of work from wedding and portraiture, to editorial and photojournalism, to glamour/advertising, to commercial/industrial, to scientific, to fine art. A few more major fields are likely missing from this list too. How one gets started can vary widely depending on the specific field.

-- John

11/25/2002 12:15:52 AM

Lori Irvin

member since: 1/8/2003
  I just read recently that this company is a scam and to stay far far away from them and their business practices. You can also get more info on fotosurf.com under "forum". Good Luck!

1/8/2003 8:03:36 PM

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Photography Question 
james ring

member since: 11/24/2002
  5 .  Why are my pictures so fuzzy sometimes
Sometimes I take pictures and the person is all fuzzy looking.I think this has to do with shutter speed .I notice that the little hand with a ! is next to it,I'm being very carefull not to move camera.I have a Fuji FinePix 3800.

11/24/2002 10:33:32 AM

John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/27/2001
  James,
The hand with a "!" next to it is the camera shake warning. Even though you are being careful, there is a limit to how steady you can hand hold a camera and therefore a limit to how slow the shutter speed can be. The basic problem is too low a lighting level. The solution is turning up the ambient lighting (if you can and it's acceptable), using a tripod if that is feasible, a faster shutter speed if that's possible, or a flash if that is feasible and acceptable (for some types of photos it's not necessarily desirable).

-- John

11/24/2002 10:24:29 PM

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Photography Question 
Al Sheets

member since: 11/23/2002
  6 .  web site gone wrong
what ever happen to web site photo trust.why----about a year ago

11/23/2002 4:42:12 AM

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Photography Question 
Niick Jones

member since: 11/18/2002
  7 .  Focal Length
What does focal length mean?

I am about to purchase a digital camera and am confused.

11/18/2002 5:04:16 PM

Jeff S. Kennedy

member since: 3/4/2002
  Focal length refers to the distance from the film plane (or in your case the digital recording device) to the front element of the lens. Long focal lengths are telephoto lenses and short focal lengths are wide angle lenses.

11/19/2002 1:24:08 AM

Niick Jones

member since: 11/18/2002
  Thanks Jeff,
what would be better 35-70mm or 35-105mm, what is the difference?

Thanks
Nick

11/19/2002 3:59:06 PM

Jeff S. Kennedy

member since: 3/4/2002
  It's tough to say which would be better. I depends on what you are going to do with it as well as the quality and characteristics of each lens. Generally speaking, however, a zoom that encompasses a shorter range (like the 35-70) is usually going to be sharper than one that covers a longer range (like the 35-105). You also have to think about the economics. Can you get by with a 35-70 and possibly add a 105mm lens or does it make more sense just to have one lens that covers the whole range? And if there is a loss in quality is it worth it not to have to buy two lenses and carry two lenses?

11/20/2002 11:57:26 AM

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Photography Question 
Ruslan Safin

member since: 12/21/2001
  8 .  afraid of shooting after knowledge
Dear Jim!

I started seriously interesting in photography more than a year ago. I shot anything at any place - and the pics were interesting and more showing. To deepen the knowledge of photography I had searched and read and dug quite a pile of articles and books, I even attended photocourses for 2,5 months. The result is that I know significantly more about photography, I discriminate quite good in composition, light etc. BUT I became afraid of shooting as I used to do. Is it the problem of growing up and did it happen to you and how did you find the way out? Or is it simply a matter of time?
Thank you!
Ruslan

11/13/2002 4:21:28 AM

Ken Pang

member since: 7/8/2000
  I know your feeling, Ruslan!

The more I knew about photography, the less I wanted to shoot! Why? Because I was more discriminating and it became harder to get photos that made me happy.

I did a few at a friend's wedding the other week. Out of the whole roll, I really only got 4 or 5 that were "good" photos, where as before, I would have been happy with most of them, and stoked that I got 4 or 5 really good photos.

I'm doing a friend's formal tonight. I'm feeling pretty apprehensive about it, because I'm expecting a lot out of it and wondering if I can deliver. (Of course it doesn't help that I really want to impress her with the photos - I asked to do them for her, so I don't want to disappoint her)

I think the only answer is to go out and shoot, knowing that out of a whole roll, there may be only a handful of good photos, but everyone else will still like your other ones, because they're not as discriminating as those of us who have studied photography a lot.

11/13/2002 8:28:38 PM

Ruslan Safin

member since: 12/21/2001
  Thank you, Ken, for the answer which turned out to be quite a support! In fact I know how to make better pictures from aesthetical point of view . I have understood that the matter is that when a boy becomes a man he leaves his freedom of carelessness - I can't shoot as I used to like running around. It's not a boyish joy any more, it's time to, so to say, hold responsibility for the images that you see and the ideas of which you convey to spectators and yourself. (most of the roll will definitely go into bin:))

11/14/2002 3:05:40 AM

Judith A. Clark

member since: 9/14/2002
  It sounds to me like you guys need a new challenge try shooting something new or buy some new equipment to learn and expand your horizons. Ok we all pitch half the roll now, because its just not good enough, go digital you can just delete the images you don't like. Keep learning, and you keep it new and excitining.

11/15/2002 6:39:08 AM

Victoria 

member since: 4/4/2002
  Call me old fashioned, but I prefer using film instead of digital. I guess they are ok for test shots, but for some reason, I cant let go of my film.
What really sucks is, It seems everyone is manipulating photos in Photoshop. Ive always strived to get the shot right the first time. Now days, anyone can go out and take pictures and turn them into excellent photos using photoshop. I admit, Ive done it myself.
But it is this that has made me less interested in shooting more, as well as learning more. I hope this makes sense.
Anyone else having trouble adjusting to digital?

11/15/2002 3:01:22 PM

Ken Pang

member since: 7/8/2000
  I use a hybrid of digital and film. I started in photography with one of the world's first megapixel cameras. It set me back over $1500 USD. Now you can pick up a megapixel camera for under $99.

But right now, I shoot with a prosumer SLR and scan the photos on to my computer with a 4000dpi scanner. This creates a 24 megapixel image: something no digital can even come close to yet.

I like film, because of its higher quality, but I do always bear in mind that if I can't get the shot perfect, I can always edit in Photoshop later.

The thing I hate about film, is that to get a good photo, you need to pay a professional lab. I pay about $5 USD to get it processed at K-Mart or even a reputable place like Fletchers, and they produce photos that are blurry, dark and off colour cast.

I scan them in and adjust slightly and I can get professional quality shots at a fraction of the price. You should see my latest batch. Most the photos are throw aways, but once I scan them in with a bit of adjustment, they come out perfect.

11/15/2002 7:51:57 PM

Judith A. Clark

member since: 9/14/2002
  OK I didn't mean to start a conversation
on digital versus film, but I just started using a Nikon D100, I do try to get the shot right the first time, because I hate the editing part, and I don't understand photo shop, other then getting rid of some noise, I really haven't had to edit. The results are so much better then anything I could do with a scaner. The colors are true, the emages sharp, and the details are amazing. I print with an epson 1280, and I dare anyone to tell the difference between what I print and what comes from the crappy photo studios at walmart and kmart. I also use Gepe inkjet fix spray (even though its not recomended by epson) and I can run my prints under the faucet and dry them with a towel, after two coats. Digital has given me a new challenge, that makes me want to shoot again, saves me time and money proccessing film, and its just plain fun to see the prints instantly. If you don't want to go digital, my point was, just try something new, and keep it exciting.

11/16/2002 6:55:50 AM

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Photography Question 
GARY VERMEULEN

member since: 11/5/2002
  9 .  HOW TO SHOOT SPORTS PHOTOS IN LOW LIGHT
I HAVE A MAXXUM 5 AND A 70X300 LENS - I DON'T USE A FLASH AND MY PICTURES ARE TURNING OUT TO DARK OR NOT AT ALL- I'M USING 800 ISO KODAK FILM -HOW CAN I FIX THIS PROBLEM

11/5/2002 12:03:42 PM

Wayne Attridge

member since: 9/27/2002
  Low light is hard enough with stills. If you are trying to stop action you must of course use a faster shutter speed. I would imagine that with a 300 zoom your f stop is probably 5.6 or 8. If it is then you are not getting enough light. You can buy faster pro film and push it if your lab will do that for you and then you could shoot at 3200. Remember though, the faster you shoot, the grainier the picture. You may need a faster lens. I shoot with a 200mm 2.8 Canon lens and even that is difficult. Good luck.

11/5/2002 1:02:17 PM

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Photography Question 
Jane Babcock

member since: 10/3/2002
  10 .  Transferring Files to the Contest
I found your website in early October. I have tried to enter the contest every day since. I was able to transfer my file only twice. The image is in jpeg. I get to the point that the image is 100% transferred but the pop up part of the program where one categorizes the photo does not appear. What am I doing wrong?

I think your website is excellent and look forward to entering the contest and possibly getting my own website.

Thank you.

10/31/2002 3:44:48 PM

James Miotke
BetterPhoto Member
BetterPhotoJim.com
Owner, BetterPhoto.com, Inc.
  Hi Jane,

I am not sure why your photo is not uploading. Are you confident that it is sized properly, according to the instructions? It could be that the photo is too large, perhaps?

11/16/2002 7:21:50 PM

James Miotke
BetterPhoto Member
BetterPhotoJim.com
Owner, BetterPhoto.com, Inc.
  And I almost forget, thank you very much for the nice compliment :)

11/16/2002 7:23:00 PM

Shirley L. Carpenter
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 12/14/2002
  Hi, I'm having trouble uploading also. I tried to upload for first time today. Tried it about 4 times. I'm not real good on computer so I thought I must be doing something wrong. I'm using TIFF. The blue line at bottom of computer fills all the way when I submit my photo and I was waiting for popup and waited so long got disconected. Does this make sence? Help! Thanks in advance for any help I can get.

12/22/2002 7:25:28 PM

James Miotke
BetterPhoto Member
BetterPhotoJim.com
Owner, BetterPhoto.com, Inc.
  Hi Shirley,

The important thing is the size of the photo. 9 out of times when an upload is not working, the photo needs to be downsized. If you are using Photoshop, you can do this by using the Image Size option in the Image menu. The pixel dimensions (the ### x ### part) is more important than the resolution (the 72 dpi part). The shorter dimension should be no larger than 500 pixels.

Hope this helps.

12/23/2002 12:16:27 AM

Shirley L. Carpenter
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 12/14/2002
  Hi Jim, just wanted to say thank you. I down sized my photo and got it uploaded. Thanks again. Shirley

12/27/2002 3:36:33 PM

Beau Hudspeth Photography
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/22/2004
  Another reason is will not work is if the image is in the wrong mode. The need to be in RGB. CMYK, LAB, DUO Tone and other modes will just fail to upload.

7/3/2008 4:04:55 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  Approximate gas prices in 2002
$1.20/gal

7/3/2008 7:49:45 PM

  Since buying the new "Basic" gallery I have had problems entering the contest from the gallery. They do not show up in recent entries. My member center says the image has been entered, but it can not be found in the contest pages. Please help!

7/10/2008 9:05:23 AM

Ken Smith
BetterPhoto Member
Contact Ken
Ken's Gallery

member since: 6/11/2005
  You might have to scroll thru the Contest pages, because BP sorts based on the date you first uploaded to BP, and not hte date you pulled the trigger to enter.

7/10/2008 12:27:43 PM

  What is the date that you uploaded the image, Karen? Ifyou want the imges to show up on recent entires you should enter them right after uploading them. Each photo is given a number so they are entered in numerical order.

7/10/2008 1:12:49 PM

  Thank you Ken for solving my problem. Now I understand. Jessica, from now on I will certainly do that. I have always done that but had a problem with them coming up totally white (I left one in my gallery as an example) so I was told to upload to the gallery first and enter from there. But I did a bunch in one day and that's where my problem started. You guys are really great. Thanks for your time and patience.

7/10/2008 2:22:58 PM

Ken Smith
BetterPhoto Member
Contact Ken
Ken's Gallery

member since: 6/11/2005
  Karen, I've always used the single image uploader, and never had a problem.

7/10/2008 4:22:59 PM

  $1.20?

7/10/2008 7:00:37 PM

Cary Rogers
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/30/2006
  In regards to Mr. La Grange's remark: in 2001, the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.

8/1/2008 1:05:38 PM

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