BetterPhoto.com - Become a better photographer today!
EMAIL:
PASSWORD:
remember me:     
     


Photography QnA: Digital Files and Formats

Browse by Category | All New Questions | All New Responses | Q&A Home

Category: All About Photography : Digital Photographic Discussions - Imaging Basics : Digital Files and Formats

Looking for a digital file formats glossary? Wondering what format is best for your digital images? Check out these discussions.

Page 1 : 1 -10 of 59 questions

  skip to page
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | ...6
Next 10  >>
     
 
Photography Question 
Brenda Bledsoe
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 12/20/2009
  1 .  Raw Processing Programs
I have an Olympus E510 and my computer is an HP laptop. I want to begin shooting in Raw format but unsure what program I need to manage them once I take them. Any information would be appreciated.
Thank you.

1/10/2010 11:36:50 AM

  Hello Brenda,
The CD Rom that came with your camera should have a Raw processing software included. I use Photoshop CS3 with ACR (Adobe Camera Raw) to process my Raw files (Canon 1Ds, 40D and 20D), and it does 90% of my editing. ACR has a simple and logical flow from top to bottom where I can change/correct the White Balance, Fill light, brightness, contrast, etc. - and then there are tabs for further editing like curves and selective colors, etc..
Most Canon raw files are .CR2 or .TIF, and once I edit them in ACR, I save them as uncompressed TIFF files, which will make a 11MB raw file about 58MB (at 16 bits). This is preferable for printing and further editing.
I took a BetterPhoto course in the past for Raw processing, and Charlotte Lowry now teaches a Camera Raw course.
Hope this helps.

1/10/2010 12:00:04 PM

Lois Wilkes
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/20/2009
  Just a note about camera raw. I use CS3. It opens my Canon Rebel XT and S70 raw files fine. But when I upgraded to Canon G10 and Rebel T1i, even though they are still .cr2, they will not open. I would have to upgrade to CS4 to open them. The raw files will open in Elements 7. There is no problem with jpegs from the new cameras.

1/12/2010 8:53:24 AM

  Brenda:

You can also consider LightRoom 2. One big advantage of LR2 over CS is that it saves your changes non-destructively to your RAW files. You don't have to keep multiple versions of the same image, e.g., no more extra PSD or TIFF files to save.

LightRoom 3 is in beta and can be downloaded from Adobe if you want to 'try before you buy'.

Lois:

You might try updating just ACR. Run

Help Updates

in CS3 and it should offer you an update for ACR to the latest version, even if you do not update CSx.

Cheers,

RK

1/12/2010 2:32:54 PM

Jerzy E. Lasota

member since: 9/8/2006
  Hello Brenda,

It all depends on your budget. I am using Photoshop CS-04. But Olympus comes bundled with Olympus Master software, which does a very competent job without having to spend an additional penny. My only complaint about this software is that it seems to be a little slow. Also Photoshop Elements (all versions) are capable of handling those files and, last but not least, Corel Paint Shop Pro Photo X2. Elements and Corel will set you back by about $80.00 - $100.00. CS-04 about $800.00. Loaded with features, many of which you will never use.

Good luck.

Jerry

1/12/2010 7:42:17 PM

Lois Wilkes
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/20/2009
  Brenda,
Just a note: I do not know anything about your camera's age. My guess is that if it is over 1 1/2- 2 yrs old Corel Paint Shop ProX2 will open the raw photos. I have it and it will not open the raw from the newer cameras I mentioned. If there is olympus s/w that came with your camera it certainly will open them, but if its like the Canon s/w it will not save the results in anything but the original raw as I remember. (Its not on my computer now so I can't recheck) So I was unable to edit my photos in CS3 or Corel after. I guess the next question is what do you want to do with them once they are open? Do you need better editing s/w like PS or Corel? I made the assumption that you did, but perhaps that is the wrong assumption. Does you camera take both jpg and raw at the same time as is available on my Canon. If so, give it a try.
As RKS suggested, I did the Adobe upgrades, but that made no difference. I have not tried lightroom3 beta yet. When Adobe 5 comes out some day I will upgrade. Unless and until I get this resolved, I will save my edited photos as PSDs so I don't have to go back to the original jpgs too often.

1/13/2010 5:04:33 AM

  Brenda:

One additional solution to consider. You can convert the Olympus RAW files to DNG format and it should work with any relatively modern photo app. (I convert all of my RAW photos to DNG as soon as I download them, but that is another discussion entirely.)

You can get the DNG converter here:

http://www.adobe.com/support/downloads/detail.jsp?ftpID=4620

1/13/2010 5:28:46 AM

  Lois:

I was surprised to learn that CS3 does not support ACR 5.6, so it is not possible to convert many Olympus model RAW files in CS3.

But there is a plug-in that you can download from Adobe. I didn't find the app, but you may be able to track it down with these references:

http://myolympus.org/E510/
has this blurb:
"Adobe Photoshop CS3 is capable of converting E510 RAW files. You will need the Camera RAW 4.2 plugin (earlier versions do not support E510 RAW files)."

The item links to this page:

http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshop/cameraraw.html

but you may need to search around for the 4.2 plugin.

Hope that helps a bit.

The item above about DNG also applies. You can find more info about DNG here:

http://www.adobe.com/products/dng/

1/13/2010 5:35:32 AM

Lois Wilkes
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/20/2009
  RK,
I will give it a try and let you know if I am successful. Thanks so much for your help. This has been driving me crazy. I don't want to upgrade to CS4 for $200 at this time since I suspect that CS5 will be announced sometime this year, hopefully if I don't find the solution to this.


1/13/2010 6:43:53 AM

Lois Wilkes
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/20/2009
  RK,
The stand alone DNG converter works like a charm. I can't thank you enough for the information!!

Brenda,
http://www.adobe.com/support/downloads/detail.jsp?ftpID=4620 is where I found this free stand alone program if you also want to try it.
Lois

1/13/2010 10:32:07 AM

Pamela Frost
BetterPhoto Member
newcreationpictures.com

member since: 9/3/2005
  I use Photoshop Elements 7 but since I have a newer camera (canon rebel xti1) I had to download a plug in for it to work. I didnt like the dng format b/c I cdn't figure out how to convert the dng to any other format tiff or jpeg so I didnt know what good it did?

1/13/2010 6:50:28 PM

Lois Wilkes
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/20/2009
  Pamela,
I can't speak to the plug in as I don't have it. But I would have thought that once installed it would cause Elements to recognize the format. What I referenced is a stand alone program since I couldn't find any plug ins that worked for me.
I have the icon for it on my desktop. Select the folder where the CR2s are and select where I want the DNGs to be. Once converted, open the photo in Elements as you would any other photo and you are ready to go. I have both CS3 and Elements 7 and converted some photos from my Canon G10 and also just tried the Rebel T1i which was a Christmas gift this year and it worked like a charm. Corel Paint Shop Pro X2 also recognized the dng. Hope this helps.

1/14/2010 5:20:38 AM

  Photoshop Elements 7 will support your camera, Pam.

But you need to update it.

Here's where you can get the update.

For Windows http://www.adobe.com/support/downloads/detail.jsp?ftpID=4622

For Mac
http://www.adobe.com/support/downloads/detail.jsp?ftpID=4621

To find the Instructions for installing it into your computer, scroll down on the adobe.com page to this:

Refer to the following ReadMe file for other updates in this version:Camera Raw 5.6 ReadMe

That provides useful installation instructions.

Then you would not need to use DNG at all.

Cheers! Peter

2/2/2010 12:21:02 PM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
Larry D. White

member since: 9/23/2008
  2 .  JPEGs: When Does Loss of Quality Occur?
Can anyone tell me if there is loss involved with copy and paste in Windows XP when moving JPEG images from an SD card to a hard drive? Also, is there any loss involved when JPEGs are moved from one directory to another on the same drive? Thanks

9/27/2008 5:18:04 PM

Alan N. Marcus

member since: 3/4/2006
  No loss involved in the copy-paste operation. This is true regardless of operating system - regardless of location ... i.e. one director to another of one drive to another or SD to another SD or SD to hard drive.

9/27/2008 10:21:34 PM

  Just to expand on Alan's correct response:
Saving is when JPEG files have loss. In the process of encoding the file is evaluated, and that is when the loss occurs. In other words, you can copy the files and even view them without saving and you will not harm the image content.

9/28/2008 7:04:37 AM

Larry D. White

member since: 9/23/2008
  Thank you Alan and Richard, It was something I was trying to get an answer to on the internet without any success.
Larry

9/28/2008 12:24:22 PM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
Kimber Wallwork-Heineman
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 12/19/2005
  3 .  Converting Batch of Raw Photos to JPEGs
Is there an easy straight forward way to take a batch of photos in Bridge and convert them from Raw photos to JPEG? I have an industrial shoot that I shot in Raw format. The shots will be used on a Web site so I need to convert all of them (about 100) to JPEG format. There must be an easy automated way to do this from Bridge (I hope).

9/12/2008 5:30:08 AM

  Hi Kimber,
Select all the Raw images you want to convert and open them at the same time in PS. They will all be loaded into ACR and you can select them all again and save as .tif or .jpg and also the quality you would like them saved as.

9/12/2008 12:31:05 PM

Kimber Wallwork-Heineman
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 12/19/2005
  What is ACR?

9/12/2008 1:42:43 PM

  Adobe Camera Raw: It's the Photoshop program that edits Raw images. If you click on a Raw image to open in PS, ACR is what it opens in.
You can open several images at a time from Bridge, hold the command or control key while clicking on the images, and then right click open and they should all open in ACR. There, you can do individual edits if you wish, and if there are any you don't want to include in the batch select the Trash icon and it will omit it. After that, you "select all" (it will leave out any marked as "trash") and then save and it will prompt you for what folder and what type you want to save the image as.

9/12/2008 1:53:25 PM

Kimber Wallwork-Heineman
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 12/19/2005
  Carlton,
Thank you so much - it worked beautifully!
Kimber

9/13/2008 1:11:34 PM

  Hi Amber, I am happy it worked out for you & I am happy to help.
Carlton

9/14/2008 8:31:38 AM

Phillip A. Flusche
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/17/2003
  There is another program that will do the same thing. If you have Nikon Camera it probably came with Nikon Capture NX or NX2. Open the program and then selct the folder where you photos are and then before opening any of them for editing select all of the them (RAW) and then select save as. In the save as window you can select where the save folder will be. Then just selct JPG or TIF as the extension and the files will be saved where specified as JPG or TIF.

9/16/2008 6:15:00 AM

Robert F. Wilson
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/24/2002
  Google Irfanview, its a free download and works well. Someone told me about it on BetterPhoto.

9/16/2008 2:20:13 PM

Kimber Wallwork-Heineman
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 12/19/2005
  Thanks guys,
The suggestion to use bridge worked great!

9/16/2008 2:25:37 PM

Roy Blinston
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/4/2005
  You can automate big groups of Pics in Photoshop using BATCH (in Menus).

I have Photoshop 7 and cannot open my RAW files. What is this ACR you refer to (does it work in PS7) or is there another way of opening them????

9/17/2008 10:16:28 AM

Kimber Wallwork-Heineman
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 12/19/2005
  Im afraid I have no way of knowing about PS 7. If you open your raw photos and they come up in Adobe Raw Converter then you will see a column on the left with buttons on top that say Select All and Synchronize. If you push the select all at the top left and the save as button on the bottom left you get a dialog asking where and in what format. This is where you can choose jpegs or tiffs to save to a separate folder. Hope that helps

9/17/2008 12:43:33 PM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
marsha e. lee
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 11/23/2005
  4 .  Shooting in Raw Format
I have just purchased my first SLR camera and have been shooting Raw files. My problem is Photoshop 7.0 isn't opening a viewable photo. Any ideas? I checked help and followed the instructions, but upon opening, all I get is a grey space. As a newbie, any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

7/8/2008 4:55:46 AM

John Sandstedt
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/8/2001
  There are two possible issues.
First, there are a number of issues with Photoshop 7.0 and certain camera files (Raw ones) cannot be read as Raw files.
The second is that you probably need to download Adobe Camera Raw from the Adobe site. It's free. Just be certain you look through "back files" since I believe the more current downloads will only work with CS3 and Elements 5/6.

7/8/2008 5:04:12 AM

Cory L. Wilson

member since: 5/12/2006
  I shoot RAW with a Nikon D50, and also use Photoshop 7. I had to download Adobe Camera Raw, and it works fine. My only problem with it is that it asks you how you want your image opened (unchanged, incadescent lighting, shade, flash, etc.). So you have to choose how you want it opened (usually unchanged), then wait for the few second process of it actually opening. It is a slow process, but at least it works. Good luck!
~Cory Wilson
(c-leegallery)

7/16/2008 1:37:57 AM

  Hi Marsha,
The Canon software that came with your camera can be used as well. A friend of mine preferred the Canon software over photoshop for processing raw images until he recently upgraded to CS3 (which came with an improved ACR). Try it out.

7/16/2008 4:50:05 AM

Marianne Fortin
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/23/2006
  Try using your Canon software (Digital Photo Professional) to process your RAW files. You open the file in DPP, make your adjustments and then use "Convert and save" from the file menu (I usually work on several files before converting and save as TIFF). Then open the file in Photoshop (I use Elements 5.0).


7/16/2008 7:46:57 AM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
Subhajit Dutta, THIRD EYE, KOLKATA

member since: 12/15/2006
  5 .  JPEG: Generation Loss?
A friend told me that if I copy images from memory card to computer and then write to cd / dvd, it will cause generation loss and, not only that, the same thing if I review images on the camera back (camera Lcd). Is that true? Thanks.

6/23/2008 9:34:56 AM

John Sandstedt
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/8/2001
  If you upload your JPEG images from camera or memory to computer and then copy [write them] to CD/DVD, there will be no loss of quality. If you edit JPEGs, there is the probability of quality loss - it's the nature of the JPEG format. There will be no loss of quality of Raw files because, for all practical purposes, there's no way to edit them and save them in the Raw file format. Normally, you'd change the format to JPEG, TIFF or DNG.

6/23/2008 9:50:49 AM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  Ditto.
MOVE or COPY = no loss.
OPEN and CLOSE w/o changes = no loss.
OPEN and SAVE = compression and losses even if no changes are made.

6/23/2008 11:28:58 AM

Roy Blinston
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/4/2005
  One cause of potential loss of quality is if one edit's the pics then re-saves them at a different quality setting. This can happen if people are not aware of what they are doing with the quality dialogue boxes.
If your original pic is say 3000 x 2000 pixels at JPEG high, you open it, make some tweaks or edits, then save it at a different level to what you originally had (ie: 1500 x 1000 pixels). Some people do not even look at the quality settings box.

6/24/2008 4:52:18 AM

Jerry & Karen Bengtson

member since: 3/16/2005
  Any time you open your JPEG image and resave the image, you will lose quality. But it takes about 10 times before you can start to see the difference.

But I recommend you save your files as TIFF or PSD files while editing the files, then save them as JPEG for printing.

6/24/2008 6:01:39 AM

Phillip A. Flusche
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/17/2003
  From the first answer by John S., you are completely wrong. You can edit RAW files and then to save them still in RAW format. I use Nikon's NX2 or NX1 editing programs and I edit all my RAW files save them in RAW(NEF) format, i.e. Nikon's NEF format. These files are saved in a completely non-destructive manner so that I can go back to either last saved copy or even to the original file and start over anytime I want. Once I have the file edited in NX and if I was not able to accomplish all that I want, which is rare, I can then directly open up the file directly from NX to Photoshop. It is converted to TIF by NX with no loss of data before it ever opens in Photoshop. For all you Nikonians out there try NX2 for free for 60 days (www.nikonmall.com) and see what I am talking about. Photoshop can't even come close to the basic editing capabilities of NX2 for RAW files.

6/24/2008 7:11:47 AM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
ANDRAY STROUD

member since: 11/6/2007
  6 .  Shooting Raw ... By Mistake!
I am a Photoshop CS3 novice, and I accidentally left my camera on the Raw setting while shooting a function. Not sure how but I had fired 60 images before I noticed. Nevertheless, I have CS3 and Lightroom. How can I convert my Raw images to JPEG? Please help.

5/3/2008 6:06:38 PM

  Andray,
Just do the following after downloading the images to your computer:
1. Open Photoshop.
2. Choose File>Open from the program menus.
3. Locate one of the files via the Open dialog, and click the Open button.
4. The image will open in the Camera RAW dialog. Click Open Image.
5. Convert the image to 8-bit by choosing 8-bit from the Image menu (Image>Mode>8-bit)
6. Choose Save As from the File menu.
7. Choose JPEG from the Format drop list.
8. Change the file name and location where you want it saved, then click Save.
9. When the JPEG options dialog appears, move the quality slider all the way right.
10. Click OK.
This will save the highest quality JPEG. Others may chime in to tell you to make adjustments in RAW - but that is a whole additional can of worms.

5/4/2008 11:24:22 AM

Pat Harry
BetterPhoto Member
Contact Pat
Pat's Gallery

member since: 11/26/2006
  Richard, why do you do step 5 - convert to 8-bit?

5/4/2008 11:35:27 AM

  Pat, you can save 16 bit as TIFF but not as jpeg so you must convert to 8 bit first.

5/4/2008 5:16:33 PM

  Carlton's got it. The other possibility would have been using Save For Web, but then there is a whole additional dialog to deal with.

5/4/2008 5:38:59 PM

Pat Harry
BetterPhoto Member
Contact Pat
Pat's Gallery

member since: 11/26/2006
  I've just never done that step. I do a "save as" and then select .jpg. Does this possibly do the conversion for me and I just didn't realize it?

5/4/2008 5:49:02 PM

Pam Bosch
BetterPhoto Member
pamboschphotography.com

member since: 4/8/2006
  You can covert by batch in Lightroom as well if you have imported them into Lightroom from your card. This will save your raw images and create a new set of JPEG files.
1. Select all the images in the library mode (CTRL-A).
2. Click on Export button in lower left side (library mode).
3. Follow the dialog boxes and choose where you want to store the files, how to name them and the quality.
4. New converted files will be saved in the new folder of your either created or used.

You can then import the JPEG files into your Lightroom library.

It's quick and easy.

Pam Bosch

5/6/2008 6:03:57 AM

  16-bits is huge. Especially as tif, it will clog up your computer and empty the amount of mega bytes you have within the computer in no time flat.

16 bits is wonderful to work in, but not for storing images.

Bunny
another novice

5/6/2008 6:29:05 AM

Zj >>> ZJ Images

member since: 6/2/2005
  Another approach:
1)Go to Bridge
2)Select(ctrl+click) all images you want to convert
3)Under Tools/Photoshop/Image processor click
4)PS3 opens and presents a dialog box
Make the changes you want here: JPEG file size, resize, quality and where you want to save the converted JPEGS. Now PS3 takes over the conversion of all your selected images.

5/6/2008 7:54:21 AM

Mary C. Legg
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 6/15/2006
  If you have software with the camera, it might give you very nice options such as with the Canon Digital Professional. I was intimidated by chatter on RAW, but I had no choice but to jump for it in situation and pressure I had. Everything was new to me and CS3 can be very unwieldy and doesn't like batching and tagging things easily.

1.Open the Canon software, click open he folder on the sidebar. You have options to do all your light editing, dust delete, exposure.

2.You can batch. Use your CTRL key +mouse click to highlight the images.

3. Right click mouse and choose "edit in edit window" if you wish to do any light editing and this helps you review what you really want to save. You can delete anything from the list which you wish to trash.

4.on top menu, choose Batch under file. Now you have several choices that are automatic. you can make your file tags for entire folder very easily. You can save 16bit, 8bit, JPG or tiff + thumbnail or customize your size and res.


5. I delete all big jpgs off my computer and create a low-res image 640 x 427 72dpi for reference. After the light editing of the CR2 RAW, I move all the Images over to my archive, but keep the small 640 x 427 jpg 72dpi on my computer for reference. All images are also backed up on disk as well as the external terrabyte.

anything I want to delete, I just don't batch and the file gets deleted. Maybe it seems like work, but it saves tons of space on my computer when I am shooting multiple 4gb cards a day.

The quality of this batching is high enough to pass Alamy and AGE Fotostock and this was how I got my contract with AGE from the first images off the new camera with a portfolio of 100 butterflies in 6days. I'd never used RAW before, had no idea what EXIF data was or used Photoshop. CS3 was just horrible experience for me. It killed my computer. Now I used the CS3 for final edit of tiffs, but I am not techie oriented and have little skill for sophisticated photo editing.

this cuts time for preparing new submission portfolios for stock photography because usually only low-res 72dpi small jpgs are wanted for the review round and at the same time I am able to spin off my 16bit tiffs into separate folder to await the final selection for final edit and jpg conversion or direct tiff submission. What remains rejected I can easily recycle to 2nd and 3d agents.

It's not the easiest way to learn photography or a camera, but I made the jump with first images off the camera from the first 6days. I'd only used the small Kodak Z700 or Canon pocket before for a year. The 25th image of the Canon 400D is here on BP. Don't laugh, but I spent a day just practicing putting on the 100mm 2.8 lens so I would do it without anxiety.

I should thank BP, because I received the contract from AGE Fotostock on the one-year anniversary of the Finalist recognition of Berger's Clouded Yellow with Kodak Z700 in Sept 2006. It took one year for me to move from the KodakZ700 to getting a exclusive stock agent contract. It's very hard work and I still don't know anything.

5/7/2008 12:03:43 AM

  Pat,
If you are not shooting in RAW or if you convert to 8-bit when you open, you don't have to convert to 8-bit again. I was assuming the RAW shots were being opened in 16-bit.

Bunny,
The files should be roughly twice the size with 35 trillion color possibilities rather than 16 million -- or 2 million times as much color. Granted you can't yet use it in 8-bit printing or display, but certainly the potential for higher fidelity and greater latitude in corrections. I consider a few dollars on storage a worthwhile investment in the potential and where technology may lead in the future.

Mary,
Interesting story. Photoshop is indeed tough to learn. I am still at it after 17 years behind the wheel. It can improve your photos and your photography, though, and can be worth investing the time to learn. My Photoshop 101: The Photoshop Essentials Primer course here on betterphoto is all about helping people get started.

Richard Lynch

5/7/2008 4:25:26 AM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
Iker M. Gutierrez

member since: 6/27/2007
  7 .  Batch Naming in Photoshop
I took about 60 photos, and used the Automate Rename batch. At first, it looked like it worked greatd. Later, I tried to open a photo from the viewfinder, and it turned into a file that Photoshop does not recognize. I hope somebody has an answer. Thanks!

1/21/2008 7:23:02 PM

Kevin Moss
thekevinmossgallery.com

member since: 12/27/2006
  Iker,
Great Question! From your explanation, it looks like you may have renamed the images on your flash card using Photoshop, then re-inserted the images into your camera. Your digital camera probably doesn't recognize the naming convention you changed to, but don't worry! Your images are probably still intact on your flash card, and you should be able to load those images to your computer and view them in Bridge.
I've written an article on the Batch Rename function. Check it out at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/article.asp?id=221

1/22/2008 6:36:30 AM

Iker M. Gutierrez

member since: 6/27/2007
  Kevin the photos I rename, I did it in photoshop cs2. I used the automate feature, and at first they all came out great with the name changed, but when I tryed to access them again, photo shop did not recognize the file. Im confused.

1/30/2008 8:05:26 PM

Kevin Moss
thekevinmossgallery.com

member since: 12/27/2006
  Iker,

If you changed the filename extention other than .tif, .psd, .jpg, .nef, .cr2 etc, which are standard extensions, Photoshop's Bridge will not recognize the files.

1/31/2008 5:20:00 AM

Ariel Lepor
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2005
  Helicon Filter does a good job batch-renaming. Maybe it will work better.

2/2/2008 10:41:51 PM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
Diane C. Pontious

member since: 7/10/2007
  8 .  How Do I Take a High-Resolution Image?
Hi all,
I'm all confused about high resolution photos. I use a Nikon d80 and shoot JPEG. I use a fine setting with large format, but I guess this isn't high resolution? What is it? How do I do it? Do I need to shoot Raw? If so, what program do I get that will allow me to open Raw images in Photoshop elements 5.0? Any help would be greatly appreciated!! Thanks so much!

12/12/2007 1:02:14 PM

William Schuette
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2006
  Hi Diane, even at fine and large, with JPEGs, some compression and loss of data occurs. At your settings, this is not really a loss of resolution as much as a loss of color bit depth or data. But this loss will limit the exposure, saturation, sharpening, etc., adjustments you can make without introducing some artifacts. So for the maximum data in your files, shoot Raw. I believe Nikon View is the free software will allow you to open NEF files. But if you really want to work with NEF files, get Nikon Capture NX. This one program will allow you to do all edits that you can do in Elements without ever leaving the NEF raw format. Plus you have the control over white balance, exposure and lighting that working in raw gives you. And all edits are nondestructive and saved as a sidecar instruction file that is much smaller than multilayered PSD files.
Bill

12/12/2007 3:20:34 PM

Pete H
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/9/2005
  Hello Diane,
The term "high resolution" is relative. Compared to most DSLRs, the point & shoot cameras are low resolution. A Mamiya 2.25" with a digital back is high resolution compared to a DSLR. It is all relative.
All the best,
Pete

12/12/2007 7:09:25 PM

Diane C. Pontious

member since: 7/10/2007
  Thank you both for the feedback, I think I get it now. I just kept hearing people talk about taking "High Resolution Images" and I didn't understand just what it meant. I'm going to download a 30 day free trial of Capture NX and go out to shoot myself some Raw images!!! Thanks Again!! Diane

12/13/2007 5:33:06 PM

Bruce Prevett

member since: 8/16/2004
  Diane, I agree with William. I have purchased the Capture NX program myself about 6 months ago, and would say that the difference between JPG and RAW is night and day. I took a picture of a Cormorant diving into the water near where I live. I was shooting at the maximum 300mm...the picture to catch the action was set to the maximum open apeture that I could and it was still dark. I brought it into the Capture NX program and brought the RAW file back to life, you could even see the water droplets from the splash. A JPG picture like that would definitely have been lost.

I would also recommend a tripod if you really want good resolution off of your D80. I find that anything above 135mm and I need the tripod just to make a good crisp shot.

12/18/2007 5:11:22 AM

Marc D. Bell

member since: 11/6/2002
  Hello all, I'm sure Diane appreciates your responses. But, as for William's response, don't you think telling her to shoot "Raw" and then stating nothing about conversion to JPEG after that is a bit confusing. Or has something changed to where you can download
"raw" images onto CD and take in for processing into prints?
Thanks,
Marc

12/18/2007 6:46:15 AM

Marvin Swetzer

member since: 12/25/2003
  You can get a free download from Adobe that will let you open and work on NEF files.

12/18/2007 7:03:05 AM

Marc D. Bell

member since: 11/6/2002
  Thank you Marvin for your response. However, that has nothing to do with my statement. I work with Adobe 7.0.1 but Diane P. needs to know that if she intends on getting her images printed they have to be in jpep or tiff format. Unless she uses her own printer to print. I use direct lambda prints (as is printing) from a local film/digital processing company. Notice you can't even submit images onto BetterPhoto if they are still raw images and have not been converted to a standard format. I hope I'm making sense, if not someone please correct me (in detail).

12/18/2007 7:15:08 AM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  It could depend on where you read or heard it. It could be somebody saying that in their bio to signify they use which ever camera has the highest pixel amount like Nikon's D2x(is that their top model now?) or it could've been somebody talking about using a camera's biggest file size.

12/18/2007 9:12:08 AM

Chandragopal Shroti

member since: 8/26/2007
  i feel resolution to the higher amount of megapixels in a camera. a 10 MP shot has more resolution than 6 MP or lower. this also comes in printing. the higher resolution images will produce larger enlargement without noise. as in films, 50 iso or 100 iso has good resolution and capability to produce grain free pix rather than 800 or 1600 iso.

regarding capturing in RAW, u will have to convert the photograph in jpeg or other formats for purpose of printing. anyhow when u shoot in raw, conversion is possible in PS. IN FAST SHOOTING, I THINK, IT WILL BE DIFFICULT TO SHOOT IN RAW since in RAW the writing speed on sensor is slow, so wait for few seconds before next shot. but as stated above by my friend, THE SHARPNESS OF RAW is unmatchable. so both have advantages and disadvantages, it is uopn u how u tackle the issue. thanks.

12/18/2007 11:17:56 AM

William Schuette
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2006
  Hi Marc, sorry I wasn't prescient enough to anticipate the questions Diane did not ask nor to divine her printing intent. Submitting any digital file to a third party means you have to be knowledgeable enough to provide it in the format they require. Of course, if she intends to print herself, she will be able to print directly from the raw format. Chandragopal, you fear of effect on shooting speed is unwarranted. If you select a jpeg mode on any good DSLR, the camera actually shoots in raw and then converts to jpeg so the frame rate is not really affected by the format. The number of shots you can store in your buffer is higher in jpeg but this is due to the fact that a great deal of data is discarded in the jpeg format - a trade off I find to be unacceptable. Finally, raw files are initally less sharp because unlike a jpeg no in camera sharpening is applied. However, with the much increased color data, raw files can generally take much greater sharpening in post processing without creating artifacts.

12/18/2007 1:52:20 PM

Bruce Prevett

member since: 8/16/2004
  Marc,

I agree that you do have to change from NEF to a different format...but Capture NX will convert to JPG or TIF. If you are completely worried about quality, then you would convert it to TIF in the program, that way you will not lose the quality. One BIG caveat though with TIF format is BIG files. But most regular developing houses will work with TIFs.

It is better to work in high def as much as possible before you JPG, because you have the HD image to go back to, if you start with JPG, then the best you'll ever get is the "loss" effect of the JPG. Don't get me wrong, JPG does have it's place...and is a good format if you are wanting snapshots.

12/18/2007 2:07:11 PM

Marc D. Bell

member since: 11/6/2002
  Hi Bruce, William and all! Wow, i'm impressed there are so many people that want to help Diane with her question. And yet, I've learned something as well. I shoot quite a lot, from Events to Publicity and everything in between..lol, and I've never shot in RAW or I tried once and they all had to be transferred to jpep or tiff. I work work adobe 7.0.1. So, If I shoot "raw" the images will be better? you see I don't use Adobe Photoshop for anything unless I'm taking out a blimish or want "just a slight hint of contrast added". So tell me, if I shoot in raw mode and get the CF card downloaded, then the images into my adobe progeam I can do any adjustments (if needed) please tell me how once I have to transfer to "Tiff Files" how exactly do I do that, or do I so it during the save as process?

12/18/2007 3:18:12 PM

William Schuette
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2006
  Fair question Marc. In CS2 or CS3, your raw files will open in Adobe Vamera Raw (unless you use another raw converter). You can make general adjustments in ACR suich as levels, curves, white balance, etc. You will have an option to either save the file or open it. If you open it from ACR, it will open in Photoshop as a PSD file. You can then do your finer adjustments, pixel editing, mask work, etc in Photoshop and when you save you use the "save as" function and can chose your format. If you want to save as a PSD or TIFF you don't need to worry abouth anything. If you want to save as a jpeg, you will need to make sure that your color mode under Image > Mode is set to 8 bit rather than 12 bit color depth or Photoshop will not allow you to save as a jpeg. When saving as a jpeg, all layers will be merged so I typically save as a PSD or TIFF first and then save a jpeg version if I want to email or post the photo to a web site.

Bill

12/19/2007 4:18:20 AM

Marc D. Bell

member since: 11/6/2002
  Thanks Bill,

I'm fairly sure most photo processing places except TIFF files, so your information helped. Can I ask you this, I use the Adobe sRGB 1998 ICC profile and also have my camera set to it. Is that a good or bad thing (But remember I don't alter much, actually don't even know how in Adobe, I try and get it right when I take the picture) as far as increased clarity in contrast and color if I start to shoot in "raw". What ICC profile do you use? I know I can't shoot in "raw" mode when I'm covering an event, I'd never be able to get all the shots I needed. But I'd like to know as much about the ICC profiles and raw format to make sure I'm using one that works best.
Thanks,
Marc

12/19/2007 6:07:25 AM

Bruce Prevett

member since: 8/16/2004
  Good answer Bill, from a PhotoShop perspective. I'll add a a little extra from a Nikon Capture NX perspective. I have worked with shooting in JPG and RAW with Capture NX and I can tell you, only half of the adjustments are available if you are shooting in JPG as compared with the RAW.

I started by shooting in JPG and after watching Jim Moitke's DVD (ya, I know...shameless plug for the site's owner), as Jim states in the video, the flexibility is there to make far more adjustments than with a JPG file.

12/19/2007 6:25:47 AM

Diane C. Pontious

member since: 7/10/2007
  Hi all. I just wanted to thank everyone for their great responses. I am learning so much here it's great!!
Thanks Again!!!!
Diane/CT

12/19/2007 11:58:51 AM

Marvin Swetzer

member since: 12/25/2003
  I keep seeing the word quality. If you want quality forget about digital and use film and not the itty-bitty 35mm.

12/19/2007 2:43:01 PM

William Schuette
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2006
  Marc, think of color profiles as a set of instructions to a device on how it is to interpret the color data, Each profile may result in a slightly different rendering of the colors. The most significant consideration though is the width of the color gamut (or total range of the colors that can be expressed) and how the profile deals with out of gamut colors. sRGB was a profile specifically develped for the internet and has the narrowest gamut. But since this is what the internet uses, you generally want pictures you upload to be in the sRGB profile or you can get some distortions when the site you post to attempts to compress a larger gamut profile such as Adobe RGB into a smaller gamut space. Often I see a distinct loss of contrast and saturation in this situation. I shoot in Nikon Adobe RGB because I want the largest gamut in the digital file. This really has little to do with the finished photo since it will either be uploaded in sRGB or printed and printers have a smaller gamut than Adobe RGB. The real advantage is the same as using the raw format - that you can make more aggressive adjustments without creating unusual artifacts. As an example, if I have a bright pink flower shot in sRGB profile and attempt to increase the saturation it is very easy for me to push the color out of the gamut and get a very artificial shiny color. However, if I shot in Adobe RGB, I have more gamut to work with and and less chance of creating that result. Once I get the picture how I want it, I save the original and make copies converting to sRGB if it will be a web pic or converting to the appropriate printing profile if I intend to make a print. After converting the profile, I carefully check the results to see whether it has changed anything and make adjustments as necessary. typically, a curves or saturation adjustment is all that is needed.

Remember, all of these things we are talking about relate to the ability to have greater control in post processing. If your commercial activities do not allow you the time to make adjustments on every picture then jpeg with appropriate in camera settings may be your best bet.

Bill

12/19/2007 3:27:58 PM

Marc D. Bell

member since: 11/6/2002
  Bill,
Thank you for your information. It was very helpful. I appreciate you taking the time to respond to my e-mail.

Marc

12/19/2007 3:48:48 PM

Ken Henry

member since: 9/16/2003
  True. sRGB is very difficult to saturate up to match the quality of RGB colors. I get better results by adjusting the sat settings at my printer and the print matched the RGB print. So I use RGB only.

I "Save As" my JPEG's into TIFF. Do any editing and then resave back to JPEG at large file 11 or 12 index.

I thought of RAW, but who's going to know your print is in RAW or JPEG?

Besides, less PS post work is more free time to take pictures and I doubt the client is going to pay me for all my post processing time. Unless I do artistic photos for sale.

Concerned about large file sizes? I use external hardrives for all my Photos. and they are probably about a 10th less in cost than a trunk full of CD's or DVD's.

Less Is More.

12/29/2007 10:18:44 AM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
Amanda  M. Freese
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/18/2007
  9 .  Resizing Digital Photos?
Set up: when you download your newly shot photos onto your computer and then open them up in Photoshop, I go into Image size to resize for best resolution quality. My question is: What's the best way to resize Rebel XTI's digital files when going through this process? Is it necessary at all? The images are in a Raw format at this moment, and I had planned to do my edits and then saving as a JPEG. Is that part correct as well? Thanks!

10/20/2007 2:06:11 PM

  Amanda,
I would not start working with an image by resizing it. Your images come off the camera with a pixel count (e.g., 3000x2000 or whatever) and that is the real resolution of the camera. The ppi (number of pixels per inch) is really an arbitrary thing - at 72 ppi, 300 ppi or 3000ppi, the image will have the same resolution in pixel count (as long as you don't resample). The ppi just defines how you expect it will be used.
I'd leave the ppi alone and make adjustments to the image (color correction, white and black point correction, dust fixes, small object removal, cropping, etc. see my Correct and Enhance Your Images course. Then worry about resolution at the end, after you know what the purpose of the image is and what output you will be using (these concerns are covered in my From Monitor to Print course, along with helping you iron out color management and calibration issues).
I would NOT save working versions of your image as JPEG for 2 reasons:
1) JPEG will not allow you to save Layered corrections (for the importance of layers, see my Leveraging Layers class).
2) JPEG will degrade in quality with multiple saves - even at highest quality. PSD formats and others like TIFF have compression without loss, while allowing you to save layered corrections.
Now that I've plugged almost every class I do here on BetterPhoto (;-) I hope I also actually answered the question!

10/21/2007 6:34:48 AM

Amanda  M. Freese
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/18/2007
  Oh you have, and I'm glad for the plugs, because I'm enrolling right now. Thanks so much!

10/21/2007 10:48:47 AM

Amanda  M. Freese
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/18/2007
  Actually, I had learned that from a mentor who instructed that resizing the photos (for a 5D camera to 9X6 & 400 pixels) would keep the highest quality up to what she imagined the largest print the client may ever need 11x14. She uses Pictage for the print package and album service, and I guess they also request you to send smaller size images. I have since stopped my mentoring as it seems I am getting a better edcucation from this site and the new classes I've just enrolled in.

BIG THANKS!

10/21/2007 12:10:52 PM

Amanda  M. Freese
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/18/2007
  So if I cram more ppi into a 550x550 size image it will be clearer?

10/22/2007 7:58:48 PM

  Amanda,
Sorry if my original answer was unclear. I am not sure, though, how you propose to 'cram' in more ppi to an image that is already defined by a pixel size.

You can't enhance detail if you don't already have it, neither by changing ppi or changing the number of pixels.

The number of pixels is a finite measure of detail. What you get off the camera is all the original detail you will ever get. You can upsize an image (called interpolation) or downsize it (decimation) and what happens in that process is that Photoshop/Elements has to guess at what should or should not be there...it isn't like you see on TV where they can make it seem like you can enhance detail to find more of it -- that is a hollywood trick, reverse engineered (they use an image with detail first and create the blurry or pixelated image and show them to you in reverse). Changing the ppi just tells the printer to use the pixels differently. The result may appear somewhat different, but not usually much clearer.

There is a 'best' resolution for output (it depends on what you are printing to, or displaying on). You can do things to make sharpness in your images more apparent (e.g., using sharpening techniques), but these have limitations. I cover these things in my classes. Often times you can print with way less than 400ppi and get great detail depending on the type of printer. Inkjets use pixels differently than offset printing (halftones), and that is different still than images on the web or printing transparencies (which can require more than 400ppi). You need to target resolution to the image use (I cover that in From Monitor to Print: Photoshop Color Workflow)

If you 'cram more ppi' into any image that has a set number of pixels, it will be SMALLER, not necessarily clearer.

OK?

10/23/2007 4:43:04 AM

  PS - glad you signed up for courses! Whether mine or from another instructor, you should enjoy and learn a lot.

Richard

10/23/2007 4:45:38 AM

Amanda  M. Freese
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/18/2007
  no your answers are clear, im in the learning mode so it hasn't jived yet. I'll be looking over your answer a couple of time to get it. . I wish our classes started sooner than Nov. 7th.. Im so eager to begin. . Thanks, I love BP!

10/23/2007 11:53:32 AM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
Jody W. Hanley

member since: 8/13/2006
  10 .  Digital Camera for Temporary Storage?
Hello: I need to transfer a few non-photo files between computers, and I don't have a flash card at the moment. Is it OK to use a digital camera with its flash card as a temporary transfer device, or is there potential for damage?

10/16/2007 7:04:57 PM

Todd Bennett
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 11/8/2004
  I think I'd take the time to drive to (insert your favorite electronics shop here) and spend 40 bucks on a San Disk 2gb flash drive and not risk it. Best Buy has 2gb PNY's for 25 bucks.

10/17/2007 5:55:32 AM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  Yes, you can use the camera's flash card as transfer memeory, but I agree with Todd. Thumb drives are too cheap and convenient to not use.

10/17/2007 6:40:16 AM

Haidar Abu Bakar
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 11/12/2007
  i have been transfering non image files to my CF card for the last 4 years without any harm done. Go ahead and do it.

11/16/2007 6:33:08 AM

Christopher A. Walrath
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 4/25/2006
  Did you get a cell phone with a memory card and a SD dummy card? That's what I've been using.

11/19/2007 7:52:28 PM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
CF, SD, xD, and other photo camera memory card formats are simply digital solid state memory. Solid state memory is by far the most reliable, persistent form of digital memory. There is no safer digital way to store your data.

Even if you drive a nail through a memory card, the data in the undamaged parts is still intact and recoverable.

So memory cards are not just good for temporary storage, they're extremely good for very PERMANENT storage.

11/19/2007 9:06:03 PM

Jody W. Hanley

member since: 8/13/2006
  Thanks for the replies.

It's good to know I did not potentially damage anything!

11/29/2007 6:57:43 PM

Jody W. Hanley

member since: 8/13/2006
  Thanks for the replies.

It's good to know I did not potentially damage anything!

11/29/2007 6:59:13 PM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
  skip to page
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | ...6
Next 10  >>

Copyright 1996-2014 BetterPhoto.com, Inc. All Rights Reserved.