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Photography QnA: Destination and Travel Photography Tutorial

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Category: All About Photography : Photographing Specific Subjects : Destination and Travel Photography Tutorial

Looking for a travel photography tutorial? Going on a trip soon and want to come back with stunning photos? Check out this Q&A. Or if you're interested in private instruction, check out Brenda Tharp's Creating Memorable Travel Images online photography course.

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Photography Question 
Charles E. Mann

member since: 2/10/2006
  1 .  Reflectors: White vs. Gold
I've bought a set of reflectors that I like some of the looks I am getting. My problem is when I use the white it doesn't seem strong enough, but when I use the gold it looks better but overpowering, blinding even. Are there some tricks that may help? Thanks in advance.

7/31/2008 8:46:21 AM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
  The white reflector provides the softest, most even fill. Silver gets a harder fill. And gold begets the same harder fill AND changes the color temperature of that fill. Gold is best used for skin tones.
I never use gold, though, since I prefer to twiddle color temp in PP, because that can be more delicate and precise than using a gold reflector.
Have fun!

7/31/2008 9:48:54 AM

Oliver Anderson
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 11/16/2004
  I've recently moved to San Francisco from Orange County and shoot for a lot of swimwear companies. I've noticed in SoCal the models were obviously much more tan so I used gold reflectors more often. The silver is my most frequently used up in San Francisco. I used the white usually with a strobe since it's so minimal. You can even shoot a strobe through the white and use it as a diffuser. All and all, it's all kinda personal preference...

7/31/2008 9:14:20 PM


BetterPhoto Member
  Gold is used for warming skin tone mostly. Silver is a highlighting reflector. White is used most often and is the reflector that is most often sold. I mainly use white. I use silver very rarely, and use, like Oliver, gold for beach shots.
Have fun and keep shooting!

8/3/2008 1:27:41 PM

Pete H
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/9/2005
  Charles,
You didn't mention the size of the reflectors or material. These will also determine the overall effect besides color.
The brightness issue is easily handled by moving further away with the reflector if too bright; now you have to deal with "light spill". Different subject.
As mentioned, reflectors come in many sizes, shapes and reflective material. Some provide "hard" light, some "soft" and everything in between. Some reflect nearly 100 percent of the light "mirror" some reflect a low percentage such as a deeply textured flat white reflector.
Some cover a very small area, maybe just a subject's face, while some cover a huge amount of space such as photographing a full size jet aircraft and covering the walls of the hanger with white (or any color necessary) material if necessary.
It all comes down to size, material and reflectivity.
all the best,
Pete

8/3/2008 8:28:47 PM

Charles E. Mann

member since: 2/10/2006
  Thanks for the help everyone. I don't rememeber the size of the reflector, it folds and pops open, 18-22 inches? I diffently don't know what it's made of. I was talking the brightness of the gold, it made the subjects squint badly. Will try the moving farher away wih the Gold. the white I even tried moving closer, I was trying to fill shadows. will look into better materials.

8/4/2008 8:30:03 AM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
"it made the subjects squint badly"

If you use a reflector outdoors, in bright daylight, your subjects will of course ALWAYS squint: they're looking directly at a reflection of the sun, for gossakes!

Outdoors, in bright daylight, it is MUCH better to use fill-flash* while the subjects have the sun at their backs or sides: no undue squinting.

Have fun!

8/4/2008 10:18:52 AM

A C
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 12/6/2004
  get a larger reflector?

if I'm in the shade, the white doesn't do much good unless I grab some of that sun that isn't in the shade

make sense?

So I'll have my subject close to the edge of the shade (if I want them in the shade) so my reflector doesn't have to be. Then I use the white side

8/4/2008 4:52:15 PM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
And then your subject is again/still looking straight at a reflection of the sun! And squinting...

8/4/2008 11:24:23 PM

  I've found that using a large sheet of white foam core available through arts and crafts stores, produces a more reflective capability that my white Lite-Disc. I attach it to the PhotoDisc holder on a light stand when I don't have someone to hold it for me. Then, I aim my flash (or the sun) at the foam core and bounce that into the shadow of subject.

Or, when capturing subjects in open shade, and I don't want the harsh light of a flash directly on the subject, I use the larger light source (the flash bounced to the foam core) as my main light and the ambient light as fill.

This is a tip an local portrait photographer-instructor in Louisiana taught us as an inexpensive bounce lighting solution.

Bounce lighting when it comes from white foam core does not cause squinting unlike the sun, or gold/silver reflectors. It also produces good tonality on the skin with outdoor portraits from my experience.

8/5/2008 11:49:01 AM

Oliver Anderson
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 11/16/2004
  I shoot for clothing companies all the time...how I make a living. I use 2 reflectors all the time a 3 ft 5x1 and a 6ft 5x1. I recommend you just buy a 6fter on EBay...they fold up compact but a foam core piece doesn't. I think I paid $40 for it online...I mean how much cheaper can it get???? my local photo store would sell it for $175.

8/5/2008 12:33:21 PM

  Oliver, Charles has a set of Lite-Discs, already. I was just offering a more reflective alternative to the White Lite-Disc which is not that reflective in comparison. And, you are correct, the Lite-Discs fold up and are easier to carry than the foam core, but the foam core is highly reflective and is another inexpensive solution, which cost me less than $10/sheet.

8/5/2008 1:11:57 PM

Charles E. Mann

member since: 2/10/2006
  Thanks again BP family! All the advise is well recieved, can't wait to go try some of your ideas.

8/7/2008 7:50:03 AM

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Photography Question 
Eli Boschetto
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/13/2008
  2 .  Photographing Waterfalls
Hi All. I've been spending a lot of time in the Columbia Gorge photographing the spring runoff in the countless waterfalls out there. I've been experimenting with switching my white balance between sun (which gives me deep greens and cool, blue-toned water) and shadow (which gives me warmer, richer greens and white- to gray-toned water). Is there a "right" exposure for this kind of shot? Thanx ~ Eli

5/29/2008 8:18:26 AM

Pete H
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/9/2005
  Eli,

Othere than HDR, the difficulty with waterfalls isn't so much white balance, but rather proper exposure; which is next to impossible to get right with one shot.

The water is almost always pure white...255-255-255 on the RGB scale.

The best way to capture this would be with one, two or 3 exposures; then simply layer them and erase away the blown out water so the properly exposed water shows thru.

Or reverse the proceedure and go for everything except the water.


all the best,

Pete

5/29/2008 9:55:44 AM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
Have you tried polarizing yet, Eli?

5/29/2008 10:10:57 AM

 
 
  Silver Falls
Silver Falls
iso100, f/22, 1.0s 40mm, tripod, circular polarizer
 
 
Hi Eli,
I use a tripod and set ISO at 100, my DOF to f/18 or f/22. I also use a circular polarizer (B&W Kaeseman) so you can control water reflections and allow for slower shutter speeds and use a remote shutter release. Most of my waterfall images on my website are done this way.
Have fun - Carlton

5/29/2008 1:26:10 PM

Ken Smith
BetterPhoto Member
Contact Ken
Ken's Gallery

member since: 6/11/2005
  I just returned from Oregon and took some shots in the same area as you. For me personally, I hate the sunlight. You'll most likely wash out the whites on the water, especially if using auto-focus. I use a polarizer to cut the light, because I want the smooth flowing water, so I try to get an exposure less than 1/8th of a second. 1/2 second is usually fine. At longer exposures, like several seconds, I think it's too smoothed out. And I also change exposure compensation to minus 1 or lower, to hopefully avoid washing out the water. Then, you can do some post-processing things to balance out the exposure in the dark areas. Bottom line: Get a polarizer or neutral density filters, and shoot in cloudy weather, or even in shade. You don't have to have sunlight to get good color saturation. Quite the opposite.

5/29/2008 1:52:01 PM

Bruce A. Dart

member since: 1/7/2007
  Eli,
A popular subject of waterfalls and all good advice. Sometimes changing the white balance can "fool" the camera into giving you a "warmer" color. Depending on the camera, you can sometimes set a different color balance. On the Nikon D200, for example, in most situations the 5000K color temperature setting gives good results. But in this instance, as has been pointed out, the polarizer and type of light to start with has more to do with the image.
Bruce

6/3/2008 5:15:30 AM

Eli Boschetto
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/13/2008
  Thanx all, for the very good information. ~ Eli

6/3/2008 7:46:37 AM

  Bryan Peterson in his course "Understanding Exposure", recommended shooting waterfalls on overcast days and metering off the foliage. Correct exposure will be a minus 1/2 stop.

Charlotte

6/3/2008 10:14:06 AM

  Thats funny Charlotte, it was Bryan Petersons book "Understanding Exposure", he mentioned Better Photo which is how I learned of its existance and have been a member ever since. Its a great book as well.

6/3/2008 10:48:18 AM

  Carlton,

Bryan's class, "Understanding Exposure" was my first BetterPhoto class and it was the Best! I didn't purchase the book, but do refer back to my class lessons and notes regularly and carry a list of some of the key things I learned in my camera bag. Recommendations for difficult exposures, etc. That class was a real turning point for me and my work. I did purchase his book, "Learning to See Creatively" and really enjoy it.

Charlotte

6/3/2008 11:09:09 AM

  Eli,

Just had another thought. You didn't mention if you were shooting in JPEG or RAW. One of the advantages in RAW is that you can change and experiment with the white balance after the fact.

I also just completed a white balance assignment for a class where we had to do comparisons on different subjects. We were taught to use a Preset white balance using a gray card. The Preset setting was superior to the other camera settings each time. It's a little more work, but if time allows, worth it.

Charlotte

6/3/2008 12:24:08 PM

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Photography Question 
MARIANNA LOUGHNER

member since: 4/14/2008
  3 .  Sunrises and Sunsets
What is the best exposure for sunrise and sunset photography? I have a Nikon d40X, and also a F2.8 105mm macro lens and a 18-200mm 3.5 -5.6. I'm going to Florida where I think the best sunsets are. Should I shoot manual??

4/14/2008 9:42:05 AM

John Sandstedt
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/8/2001
  Set your camera for Aperture Priority. Take a reading off the sky near, but not necessarily close to the ball of flame [Ole Sol.] Then shoot - use RAW, however.

With RAW you really don't need to bracket your exposure. You can expect +/- 3 stops of exposure adjustment if you use Photoshop.
Put a polarizer on your lens and take an exposure reading looking directly at the sun. Don't stare at the fireball yourself. Then compose your picture. You might be surprised at the great "black clouds" in your shot.

And, do turn away from the sun to see what's behind you in the way of great skies and color.

4/14/2008 12:13:29 PM

Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member
cammphoto.com

member since: 7/17/2003
  Florida may or may not have "the best sunsets", but the Sunshine State IS one of the few places around where one can shoot a seascape sunrise and sunset on the same day without burning a whole lot of gas.
I agree with what John S. said and would like to add a few other points to consider:
It's true that metering off the sky to the right or left of a setting (or rising) sun will give you a good reading. This works very well if the sky is blue ... but not so well if there are dark clouds in the frame during metering. In this scenario, you will need to compensate (1 stop-down) to prevent over-exposure.
Bracketing is recommended whenever shooting during extreme conditions if you want to avoid a lot of fixing later.
Try to include a subject or point of interest in the foreground. Don't expect that vibrant sunset to carry the day by itself. A passing ship, the interesting shape of an object on shore, a couple jogging along the beach, or even just someone admiring the sunset will add interest and a focal point to that great background.
And, as John suggested ... DO turn around and see the magic light and interesting shadows that are developing behind you.
Bob

4/14/2008 2:05:36 PM

Pete H
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/9/2005
  Marianna,

There are many ways to shoot a sunset/sunrise. There are many dynamics in this as mentioned, exposure AND composition.

Here's two ideas for you out of many possibilities:

Wait til the lower limb of the sun is touching the horizon. Zoom fully to 200mm; this makes the sun look bigger. Meter off the reflection in the water, NOT the sun. You won't believe how fast all this takes place. I highly recommend a tripod to be sure your horizon line is straight. Finally, compose so the horizon line is either 1/3 above center or below...don't bisect the frame. Yuck! LOL
Also, don't restrict yourself to shooting horizontal; try a few vertical.

Bracketing is always a good idea with sunsets/sunrises as the dynamic exposure range in such a shot is far to wide to get all the detail you see with your eye; the ultimate camera.

2) Take 2 shots. One for exposing the sky and water and one for the foreground, maybe the beach with crashing waves etc... If you have some basic experience with post processing, you can then "sandwich" the two shots" and use "erasure" technique to get a nice balanced shot.
As has already been said, just shooting the sun and water is pretty B-O-R-I-N-G!

all the best,

Pete

4/14/2008 7:24:23 PM

Samuel Smith
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/21/2004
  welcome marianne,
this is expierence vs chance.
a 300 with a 2x converter,a 28mm prime,setting.
boring as it may be some of us prefer it over this portrait crap.or weddings or.yet I must agree if it isin't unique.
for complete instruction we would have to be standing next to and slap you in the head every time you attempted to make a mistake.
go 2 or 3 stops over or under with a fussy kid.add fill flash and ps...
temps,humidity and weather fronts coming through are clear parts of your goal,not I will be there at this time.it doesn't matter where your at.
it's quite possible an instructor will step in and explain it better.
there is no best exposure,and then there is.i think bob was the closest yet pete took a shot,hope I passed the test,sam

4/14/2008 8:51:28 PM

Paul D.
BetterPhoto Member
Contact Paul
Paul's Gallery

member since: 1/25/2006
  Hi Marianne,

Here's a bulleted list of where to start:


    Use a tripod!

    Get a 2-stop or 3-stop Graduated Neutral Density filter to tone down the brighter sky (evens out the exposure of land vs sea). Move the filter around until the separating line lines up with the horizon. You don't want a screw-in type, they limit you to the center. Get the best, the Singh-Ray P size. Link is below.

    Start at f/18 and 1/8 sec at ISO 100 in manual exposure mode.

    BRACKET! Move your shutter speed up and down for each exposure. You'll know if the exposure is correct based on the histogram.

    If you don't want the expense of an ND Grad filter, you can take two exposures and blend them together. I prefer to get the exposure correct when shooting, just a matter of preference.

The filter link:
http://www.singh-ray.com/grndgrads.html

An article explaining ND grads:
http://singhray.blogspot.com/2006/10/from-archive-using-graduated-neutral.html

Enjoy!
Paul

4/15/2008 7:08:23 AM

Cat 
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/16/2006
  Greetings, Just a location thought from someone who lives in Florida, you mentioned sunrise-sunset seascapes in a day that means your going to be in central to southern part of state. You might grab a local map and see what lakes and rivers are in your area. Lots of good background shapes around them. Here is a link to the state parks.http://www.floridastateparks.org/ Have a good trip. C.C.

4/15/2008 9:07:02 AM

Michael McCullough

member since: 6/11/2002
  I really try to keep it simple by under exposing by a stop or so to pop the colours!

4/30/2008 11:28:06 AM

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Photography Question 
Daphne Rubinstein
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/14/2007
  4 .  D-SLR Vs. Point-and-Shoot for Trip?
I have a Canon Digital Rebel XTI with a few lenses (18-55, 75-300, 100mm macro). We will traveling to Europe in June and I am pondering whether it would be easy to bring a small point-and-shoot rather than carry all my heavy equipment. Any recommendations?

1/18/2008 9:33:56 AM

Bob Fately

member since: 4/11/2001
  WIll it be easier to take a small P&S? Naturally; there's much less to lug around and there's less worry about having your gear stolen or having the interior get dusty when you need to change lenses, etc.

On the other hand, the shutter lag on P&S and DZLR cameras can become quite an annoyance - particularly if you shoot moving subjects. And of course the quality of the DSLR will be better, but that's only noticeable if you end up making some bigger enlargements or hooting in low light conditions (the smaller chip size of the P&S cameras lead to more noise than their DSLR counterparts at a given ISO setting)

So, like everything else in life, it comes down to compromise - only you can decide if the higher quality of the images is worth the additional effort and pain of dragging around way more gear.

If the shutter lag thing doesn't bother you, though, and you do want to minimize the intrusion of the camera on your life, you might want to consider one of the DZLRs from Panasonic, Sony, etc., with the long range (10X, 18X) zooms. The lens is fixed, so you don't need to carry an entire bagful of gear, and while the lens speed might be less and the quality might not be as high as a larger and more expensive SLR lens, the weight and size savings may be worth it.

1/18/2008 9:59:11 AM

  Daphne: I'll bet you would bet better photos with the XTi. Unless you travel to Europe frequently, you might want the very best possible camera.

It would be a shame to find fabulous photo opportunities and not have the best camera and a versatile lens.

Cheers! Peter K. Burian

1/18/2008 12:38:39 PM

Christopher J. Budny
BetterPhoto Member
chrisbudny.com

member since: 10/3/2005
  What a tough one! I often miss the days of my p&s camera, for ease and comfort... I think you also have to consider what kinds of photos you reasonably expect to take... Is this going to be a photography-heavy trip? Or more of a walking-around, spontaneous photos, as time permits? Are you out for dimly-lit cathedral interiors? Or get-up-at-dawn planned landscape photos? Do you plan a box of 4x6 prints to share back home, or, artistic enlargements for the wall? In the end, I'd still probably stick to the SLR every time, which means bulk goes with the territory; but it is tempting to think of that p&s!
I have a similar lens combination for my XTi... the 100mm is my all-time, hands-down favorite lens, and not just for macro images. Followed by the 17-85EFS-IS. I myself would consider leaving behind the big zoom, unless you already envision shots needing that much reach. My zoom is the 70-300 image-stabilized, but it is my least-favorite lens. I got it because my prior p&s (a near-SLR Sony model) had 12x optical zoom, so I felt I'd need an equally big amount of zoom in an SLR lens, when I made the switch. I took all 3 lenses to England, but I also took my tripod---I use that whenever possible, and my 70-300 images turn out best when shot from the tripod, image-stabilizer or no---still, on that trip, it was my least-used lens.
I only realized later that, during the 18 month period I'd shot on the Sony, a small percentage of my overall shooting habits were ever at the full 12x zoom...

1/18/2008 1:23:12 PM

  Daphne, I totally agree with Peter. If this is a rare trip, I would take the XTi and a tripod as well. There are so many wonderful images to capture and I would hate to have the regret of not being able to get the image I wanted because of limited camera ability.
Some of the classic scenes like the Eiffel Tower, Venice, water fountains, (wherever you will be) taken with slow shutter speed at dusk with as much DOF as possible can be absolutely breathtaking. Hence ... the tripod.
Good luck with your decision!

1/19/2008 11:28:37 AM

John Sandstedt
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/8/2001
  Frankly, I'd trade your 18-55 and 75-300 in on a Tamron 18-250 or 18-300. That way all you'll carry is the XTi body and one lens.

With my EOS 3 and/or EOS 620 [film, I went to Hawaii, Italy, the Canadian Maritime Provinces and the Greek Isles - fitted with my Tamron 28-200mm zoom.

When I bought my 30D, I did buy the 17-85mm, once I realized that my 28-200 would give me about a 43 mm focal length as the widest aperture. Had the Tamrom 18-250 mm been available at the time, I never would have bought the 17-85mm. I recommended it to my son, so when I leave for my trip to the southwest national parks, I hope to be able to borrow it from him.

Note, for all the trips I mentioned save for Hawaii [at which I attended and took at my nephew's wedding]I brouhgt no extra equipment except a backpack for film, water, etc.

1/19/2008 12:30:58 PM

Gen Nagase
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/31/2003
  If you are a serious photographer (as you seem to be by just viewing your gallery), then the decision is an easy one (as you might have already figured out by suggestions given): It has to be your Canon XTI and lenses of your choice.
Here is one case I know in which a P&S will do: On a recent trip to Europe, there was another serious photographer in the group. She had both types of cameras, BUT she mainly used her P&S. Her purpose was, more or less, taking photos for her travel albums and her family and friends, i.e., for 4x6 prints. (By the way, she has taken over 1000's photos.) In this case, P&S would do just fine.
If the purpose of taking the camera is more than simply for the travel albums, then DSLR is a must. As far as macro lens is concerned, it's optional depending on your interest in macro work, such as planning to visit floral gardens, for example. When visiting a place like Hawaii, carrying a macro lens is a must IMHO for there are so much opportunity for tropical floral fields and gardens.

1/19/2008 8:30:09 PM

Denyse Clark
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/2/2002
  I agree with Nobi- it depends on your purpose for the photos.

I've gone to Europe and Mexico- in Europe I lugged all of my SLR & equipment... and vowed never to do it again because it was just so much to deal with. So for Mexico I just brought my pocket Powershot and it was perfect. But I shoot portraits, so any landscapes, monuments, etc were just for my enjoyment, not fine art.

1/22/2008 5:12:54 AM

Dawn Penso
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/6/2005
  I agree with Denyse: I live in London and go to Europe 2 or 3 times a year and used to take my DSLR plus lenses, filters, spare batteries,etc with me every time. I got fed up with lugging all that bulk and weight around so treated myself to a high quality point and shoot, a Panasonic, and got some excellent pictures with it. You can have it in your hand all the time while you're walking around, and respond quickly to situations.

I strongly recommend taking a tripod for those evening and night shots, and for landscapes. Remember, good pictures depend more on you than on your equipment.
Enjoy your trip!

Dawn

1/22/2008 7:53:59 AM

Stephanie M. Stevens

member since: 4/20/2005
  When I go on vacation I like to take both. I find that for touristy activities my DSLR is too much, it's too heavy and I end up with an aching shoulder. So I try to arrange the days so that I'm going locations for landscapes/fine art in the morning, the DSLR comes with me; during the day when the light isn't great for that kind of work we do the shopping and other touristy activities, then the P&S does fine for the album snapshots. Around sunset the DSLR comes back out.

1/22/2008 8:17:10 AM

  Stephanie: A perfect suggestion!

Peter
www.peterkburian.com

1/22/2008 8:19:51 AM

Gary Pope
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 4/17/2006
  Taking both is, of course, the perfect answer. However, if I had to choose, the P&S would win every time. Especially a pocketable one. Excellent photos can be taken with a good P&S, and the ability to actually enjoy and participate in the activities of the trip instead of merely being an observer is worth it to me. When opportunities present themselves, my P&S is ready within seconds.

1/22/2008 9:02:01 AM

Cindy Sj
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/27/2007
 
 
  coyote at dawn, yellowstone lake
coyote at dawn, yellowstone lake
...it can be done with a point and shoot! [=
 
  yellowstone in winter
yellowstone in winter
another point and shoot photo with my trusty coolpix p4!
 
 
ok...i'm a weirdo....take both, but ALWAYS keep the point and shoot in your pocket. Sometimes, as subjects quickly move away from you, you'll wish you had your shotgun (point and shoot) instead of your rifle (dslr...great accuracy, but sometimes there's just not time!) I've attempted to attach a couple of photos from a trip I took to Yellowstone...it was a spur of the moment trip that left me with only a Nikon Coolpix P4 to shoot with....I was THRILLED with the results! [= So go forth packin' both but never leave the point and shoot behind...besides, it's a great "back-up" if some bit of technology fails in either camera~ I'm a beginner, so maybe that's why I see the value of keeping something simple in the magic bag of tricks! Have a gorgeous time!!

1/22/2008 9:32:07 AM

Daniel O

member since: 5/30/2006
  I traded in 2 lenses so I could get the perfect (IMO) walking around lens -- Sigma 18-200mm f3.5-6.3 with OS (optical stablization). Expensive and worth it. It rarely comes off my camera. I do a lot of walking around, and a fair amount of travel, and usually it's the only lens I need. Sigma also makes a non-OS version which I used for a year or so and is also excellent, cheaper and lighter to boot. But I can't say enough about that OS -- more keepers shot handheld without tripod, in lower light, from moving vehicles, lower ISO, etc, etc.

Now make yourself a chain pod (http://insights.betterphoto.com/archives/2006/08/index.html) so you don't have to carry a mono pod or tripod all day, and get a small bag, and you're set!

Have fun!

Dan

1/22/2008 12:59:25 PM

Mary E. Lake
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/6/2006
  I too am going to Italy in March and am faced with the same situation. Last time I went I used my P&S, but now I've got a Sony DSLR and will be taking both. My P&S took some nice shots, but this time the tripod is also going. I plan on taking some night shots and for that we all know we need the tripod. The P&S is light as is my DSLR, the smaller one is in my pocketbook, and the other around my neck at all times. Have a wonderful picture taking time!!! Enjoy your trip!!!! Mary :-)

1/22/2008 6:01:41 PM

Linda Shapiro
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/28/2005
  This last October I went on a Mediterranean cruise and then a week traveling in Italy by train and decided to take both a P&S (Canon Powershot SD850 IS) and my Rebel XT with the 17-55 and the 75-300 lenses. I carried it in a Lowe shoulder bag and found it to be quite manageable. I took no tripod or my monopod-- I understand that in Paris, one must purchase a permit to use a tripod in any public place -- anyone have factual info on this? The fact is, in Rome, Florence and Siena, the crowds were so large that you would have a tough time finding a place to set up a tripod without risking damage to your equipment with people tripping over it or motorcycles running it down! Lean and brace, push your ISO as much as possible, choose your moments -- there will be plenty of good opportunities even without a tripod. By the third week of the trip, I resorted to using the P&S almost exclusively because of fatigue with schlepping the Rebel and a big lens. I was thrilled with the photos when I got home and loaded all 1000+ of them. Good luck and have a fun trip!!

1/22/2008 7:36:14 PM

  When we went to Eastern Europe in 2004, I took my Nikon FM3A and a tripod, but was turned away at the St. Vitus cathedral at Prague because I "looked like" a professional with my gear, our guide told me. On the other hand, tourists with point and shoot cameras were allowed to take pictures.

I'm not certain whether or not it was the tripod, or my larger SLR and exterior flash unit that had the guards in a huff, so I disappeared into the crowd, turned my tripod into a monopod, angled my flash off the camera and captured images along with the rest of the tourists.

I recommend taking both, but keep in mind; the more you take, the more than can be stolen. If you are with a tour, it is not always safe to leave your expensive lenses on the bus. I've seen drivers leave their buses and thieves can sneak in and steal gear. On the other hand, I've seen creative photographers carry diaper bags, which were actually photographic bags. Few thieves are going to reach into a diaper bag to steal something, but they may take a bee-line for a Canon or obvious camera bag.

I had an expensive Kaeseman Circular Polarizer Multi-Resistant Coating Slim Glass Filter lifted from my pocket in China. It was wrapped in germ infested Kleenex for less than 15 minutes, before it was gone --a $150 mistake! It depends how much you value your equipment.

Leaving equipment in your hotel room is not always safe either. Lap tops have been stolen, even when they were tucked away in suitcases. Lenses may or may not fit in room safes.

In China, where I could only take one lens, I chose the versatile 28-135mm for my Canon Élan 7E. But, I also carried a monopod everywhere during the day; my light weight tripod was packed amongst my clothes in my suitcase for at night when the crowds are less. I did not carry a lot of equipment to China, but still lost my $150 polarizer to theft.

In summary, only take what you can afford to lose. Don't take everything.
Then, have a fun trip with less worry!

1/22/2008 9:44:36 PM

Dawn Penso
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/6/2005
  A further note on tripods: you certainly can't use them on the streets of London or most of the European cities - too crowded, and sometimes just not allowed. (You can use one in Venice, in the squares and on some of the bridges.) Elsewhere, however, you can usually find a lamppost or wall of post box to brace yourself against - I've successfully taken pix at 1/15 sec using this method.

Do take note also of the comments regarding theft - keep your camera in your hand or around your neck all the time and if you must put your bag on the ground then put your foot on the strap, and do the same in restaurants! I'd leave the laptop at home, if I were you.


1/23/2008 1:32:51 AM

Dawn Penso
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/6/2005
 
 
  La Madeleine, Paris
La Madeleine, Paris
Leica M7, Fuji Neopan 400 ISO, f5.6, 35mm Summicron lens.
 
 
ps - just noticed a typo in my reply above - it should read '... find a lamppost or wall or post box..."

Thought I'd attach a pic taken in Paris last week inside the Madeleine, a very dark interior. I used my scarf as a beanbag and rested it on top of a chair for this shot. (I shoot b&w film, not digital, and scanned the negative then a touch of Photoshop.)

1/23/2008 2:07:42 AM

Paul Shanley

member since: 1/22/2008
  Save yourself hassle and backache - take a decent P&S. For family holidays, I take my Canon G9 which gives full manual control, great quality etc.,
From my last break in Prague, one of my images of the Charles Bridge was used by a holiday company on an A3 double cover.
As always, it's the picture that counts, not the equipment.
The P&S also causes less intrusion into a family holiday - excellent for relationships!!!!

1/23/2008 7:33:31 AM

  When we were in China, one of our tour members had a camera around her neck and a man came by and pulled, which put her on the ground. Another man pulled a point and shoot which was simply around another tourists wrist. If she didn't have her hand wrapped around her camera, it would have been a goner.

A former teacher recommended that I wrap the strap several times around my hand (rather than my neck) when carrying the camera, then having the camera firmly in my hand.

We also saw that wherever crowds congregate, like around a toddler who was walking without hold his parents hand, that this was an organized sting as another of the toddler's family was snatching purses, cameras and camera bags by slicing the straps when attention is diverted.

Turn your bags to the front of your body or under your arms and stay alert of everything and persons around you at all times. That's difficult when you are setting up tripods and carrying a lot of gear. Diverted attention is a prime target for theft.

The more you take, the more you risk losing. Only take what you can afford to lose.

1/23/2008 10:23:11 AM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
MATTHEW PARKER
BetterPhoto Member
mattparkerphotography.com

member since: 5/23/2006
  5 .  Battery Charging in the Field
Hello All,

I am planning a 20-day backpacking trip which I will be photo-documenting the entire way. Only problem is battery charging for not only my Canon EOS 20D but also for my portable external Wolvering hard-drive. I have 2 batteries for my 20D and they actually last quite a long time but not long enough for 20 days. The portable hard drive can download a 4Gb CompactFlash card about twice before the battery runs out.
Therefore, I have 2 questions for a 20-day backpacking trip (no access to electrical outlets): 1) What is the best method for batteries? Carry numerous ones or is there a cheaper and lightweight charging solution? 2) What is the best method to charge my portable hard drive?
Thanks!

5/31/2007 9:55:16 PM

Ariel Lepor
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2005
  Do you have a car? You can use outlets in cars to charge stuff. You could also take large backup batteries to connect to smaller chargers. But I actually suggest getting several lithium batteries, because they are lightweight and last for a long time.

Ariel
ScrattyPhotography Blog

5/31/2007 10:49:56 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  Don't use the monitor and use the camera's automatic shut-off. A battery for a Nikon lasted the author of a National Geographic Explorer article for a 2-week canoe trip.
The hard drive, if you can't make up a connection to something like a dry cell battery, waiting till you get back might be your choice. But two 4gig cards worth of pictures sounds like enough to me, but I pick my spots more than most people.

5/31/2007 11:13:32 PM

Stephanie M. Stevens

member since: 4/20/2005
  Look into solar chargers; try bhphotovideo.com. I don't know how expensive or heavy they are.

6/1/2007 4:01:25 AM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
  In the complete absence of AC/DC outlets, methinks well-charged spare battery* sets are the simplest way to go.

My cam gives me 500 exposures (half of them with flash) on one battery charge. So, in situations like yours, I'd take another one or two along.
Same principle with the Wolverine's batteries.

*in good condition, and well-tested in advance.

6/1/2007 4:43:30 AM

Christopher A. Vedros
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/14/2005
  Matt,
I agree that bringing spare batteries for the camera will be cheaper and lighter than any than any other option in the field. You can get spare BP-511A batteries for about $30 each.
Better yet, do you have any friends who shoot with a Canon? If they have a 10D, 20D, 30D, original Rebel, or even some of the earlier Powershot G-series cameras, they may have a spare BP-511 battery that they will loan you for the trip. Charge them all before you leave. And test them to be sure they took a full charge.
We went to DisneyWorld right after I first bought the Digital Rebel. I didn't know how long a battery would last on a full day out at the park, so I borrowed a spare from my brother who had a Powershot G2 or 3. It turned out to be a dud and wouldn't take a charge. It was a cheap knockoff that he had gotten on eBay. I only buy quality knockoffs ;-).
For the Wolverine drive, rather than bringing spare batteries for it, you make come out cheaper (and lighter) with a few extra memory cards. BestBuy usually has SanDisk Ultra II 2GB cards for about $35. Or again, check with friends to see if anyone has any spare cards to loan out for your trip.

Good luck & have fun.
Keep your socks dry.
Chris A. Vedros
www.cavphotos.com

6/1/2007 8:08:46 AM

Maureen Jackson

member since: 2/24/2007
  Hi Matt Check out www.hyperdrive.com
I'm certain that will do the trick.
Have a great one

6/6/2007 3:20:18 AM

David Allen
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/7/2005
  Hi
I have completed two treks to Everest Base Camp in recent years. I used a Canon 350D and took three batteries and enough memory cards to take 1000 highest Jpegs with no problems (even allowing for the cold). I kept the batteries warm at night by wrapping them well and placing in the centre of my back pack. Only review if you really think you have to and resist the temptation to admire your shots while resting in camp.

Dave Allen

6/6/2007 9:08:29 AM

MATTHEW PARKER
BetterPhoto Member
mattparkerphotography.com

member since: 5/23/2006
  Hello All,

Thank you very much for all of the great feedback on this question. I am thinking of buying a few more memory cards and camera batteries (it is amazing how long the charge lasts on these) and dropping the portable hard-drive. The hard-drive has to be plugged into to an outlet to charge unfortunately and does add at least 1 more pound to my pack which is unwanted. Plus, it only has enough power to download a 4GB CF card 3 times max before the charge is gone. I will also look into solar solutions. I would usually confine my shooting to dawn and dusk but I know I will be shooting during the day too since I am photo documenting the entire trip for a photo-text package.

Thanks,
Matt

6/6/2007 9:45:24 AM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
Cindy Sj
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/27/2007
  6 .  Photography on a Cruise
I'm heading out on a cruise to Alaska, and just received my first DLSR for Christmas. I'm trying to think of what I might need to take with me, and I'm scared I'll forget something critical! What would you recommend I take to make sure that I can shoot my little head off? So far, I have: 1 extra battery, 2 extra memory cards, circular polarizing filter, lens hood, lens brush, antifog cloths. Do I need a tripod? Can anyone recommend an inexpensive one that travels well? Anything else? Thanks soooooooooo much for your time in advance!

3/15/2007 5:04:18 PM

Willie  L
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/28/2006
  Are you taking a laptop to dump photos onto? If not, make sure you take lots of memory cards for your camera. The 1 and 2 gig cards have gone done in price - take several. I would hate for you not to be able to shoot your little head off. Good Luck

3/15/2007 5:15:03 PM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
  Hi Cindy,
On a ship's deck, a tripod is probably not much use because the engines make the entire ship tremble continuously. 24/7. On land, however, a tripod is your best friend. Have you got a zoom telephoto lens, Cindy? Alaska is a BIIIIG place! And don't forget your charger. Have fun!

3/15/2007 5:31:39 PM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
  Oh, and BTW, if the ship has Internet, bring the cable to connect your camera to a PC. When your memory cards are full, you upload them to a PC, zip 'm together, and send 'm to a trusted recipient back home. That way, your cards are empty again, and your photos are backed up safely. Hey, even if the ship sinks, your photos will still be there! Isn't that a comforting thought... And you don't have to buy nor schlepp around a laptop or Portable Storage Device. You can send huuuuge files (up to 1 GB) using http://www.pando.com/, or http://www.yousendit.com/.
Good luck.

3/15/2007 5:41:58 PM

  Take a battery charger for sure, depending on the size of your memory cards, maybe a 3rd extra. Tripod is basically useless on the boat. We did the Inside Passage a couple years ago ... if that's what you are doing, you won't have a whole lot of time at the ports to use your tripod since there are so many (thousands) cruise ship passengers out in town at the same time... Have a great time.
Bob

3/15/2007 7:29:25 PM

John Zimmerman
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/20/2001
  Hi Cindy,

I did this trip a few years ago. If you take group tours then leave the tripod home. My tripod spent the trip in my suitcase. Zoom lenses 24-70, 70-200 and 100-400mm were my choice. I also took a spare body too. I hope this helps.

John Zimmerman

3/20/2007 4:41:03 AM

Bill Chachkes
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/26/2006
  Hi Cindy: main thing is enjoy your trip. Thats a Dream Trip for my wife and i.

I would forgo the tripod for the reasons stated above, but if you feel you must, check out the rather inexpensive Monopods from Bogen. Also on the tripod issue, the ones Samsonite make for Video cameras are Ok for Land use, and ar under $50.

Also If no Laptop on the trip I would invest the $ in a Portable storage unit, like the Wolverine flashpak.
(mine was $99 for 40Gb's at J&R last summer)
I used to Shlep my Old Apple iBook around on every trip until it died just recently. now I take the wolverine!

3/20/2007 7:25:47 AM

  I have never been on a cruise, but I would make sure you have at least 2 extra batteries. When I purchased my Nikon D70S I bought a total of 3 battery packs and I am glad I did. I keep them all charged and in my case at all times. It would be a shame to be out taking pictures and your battery goes dead and you don't have any extras. Instead of a tripod, I carry a monopod. It's great. It breaks down and fits right into my backpack for easy carrying. Hopes this helps.

3/20/2007 7:28:24 AM

Joani 

member since: 8/29/2006
  Don't cheat on a tripod. You have hundreds of $'s on top of it. I like a ball head. Placing foam feet under the tripod while on board cuts some of the vibration.
If you have a chance at a club meeting or on a field trip, try a varity of tripods. I like one that goes to ground level, for belly photography, and reaches as tall as myself. A day with a slight bending kills the back.
Alaska is cool. Have visited there several times since 1962. No cruises. I like the free spirit.

3/20/2007 8:23:52 AM

Dale M. Garvey

member since: 3/13/2006
  Take and read the camera's manual. Try some of the setting you don't normally use. Take a laptop. I use a D2H and D200 but can't see to edit while the images are still in the camera. Remember you are shooting digital so taking extra photos is not expensive. In tricky lighting (sun sets, animals)you might consider to shoot in the raw format so you can adjust your exposure in the computer. Take a lot of photos before you go so you are not trying to learn how your camera works while you are on your cruse. Invest in a good telephoto. The photos you see in the ads are not taken with a 50 mm.

3/20/2007 8:28:28 AM

Kathy Silver
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/31/2006
  Hi Cindy - I too am going to Alaska in May - so excited. I'm thinking of taking a monopod. I was there in 2005 with a Sony digital point and shoot and came away with some good shots but I took tons - make sure you have plenty of memory or at least something to upload them onto to free up your space. And your charger !!! This time I have a Canon 30D and two great lens (one is a 100-400 IS) so I hope to come home with awesome shots. Good Luck and remember to have FUN :)

3/20/2007 9:24:42 AM

Linda C. Price

member since: 1/15/2007
  I just returned from a trip to Costa Rica and took 672 pictures. I had a 1 gig, 2 gig, and 512 mb memory sticks with me and just used the 2 gig. I took several rechargable batteries with me and my charger. I actually let some others use my batteries because I kept them charged and with me at all times. I'd never go anywhere without my charger and batteries.
There is nothing more disappointing than to have a camera with you and no memory to spare. One person on our trip did just that and she was out of luck.
Take plenty of memory and plenty of batteries to be charged.

3/20/2007 10:04:33 AM

Dale M. Garvey

member since: 3/13/2006
  No one has mentioned the quality of image to use. Plan ahead if you think you might want to get enlargements. I use Fine for most of my images which produces about 4 meg file. For posters I do for a local college I use raw (10.2 meg). Shutterfly has produced some beautiful 20x30 images from these sizes.

3/20/2007 10:18:30 AM

Brad Calkins
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/2/2005
  I would also suggest bringing a blower brush (similar to the lens brush, but without the brush) to clean your sensor, if your camera doesn't have built in sensor cleaning. Enjoy your trip!

3/20/2007 12:25:07 PM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
"No one has mentioned the quality of image to use."

That may be because you should shoot at the highest possible quality/resolution/size, because afterwards you can always pare that DOWN to less quality/resolution/size, but never ever UP!

Sure, that means big file sizes. But memory has never been cheaper than today, so 'economizing' on quality/resolution/size is stupid.
Besides, with http://www.pando.com/ and http://www.yousendit.com/ you don't even NEED extra memory! Just empty your card, zip the contents, and send to a trusted recipient back home.

Good luck!

3/20/2007 12:38:26 PM

Ros Ms 

member since: 3/20/2007
  Do invest in a portable external drive. They are small, fit in your pocket, saves buying heaps of memo cards - you still need two though - one in camera and one busy downloading!!!! It saves you having to spend valuable shooting time sitting I f o laptop or comp to download your pics. AND you will never be without memory. Instead of a tripod, a monopod, but do practise using it before you go! Only way to get realy sharp pics specially if you are going to use a zoom lens. It can serve as a walking stick too. I NEVER go touring without the above.

Have fun you lucky girl!

3/20/2007 2:53:42 PM

Robert Brosnan
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/17/2003
  I really recommend the portable hard drives. I bought a 40 gig for $89 earlier this year. It is rechargable and runs a long time between charges. It saves each download from the card as an individual file so they are easy to sort out later.
Enjoy yourself. Robert

3/20/2007 2:57:47 PM

Dale M. Garvey

member since: 3/13/2006
  As a newspaper photographer I often shoot in bad or no light. Before you go on your trip learn how slow you can shoot without getting garbage. 1/15 and panning can produce grreat shots. You can also find a tree or a rock to use as a support. With digital images you can take several and hope that one is that perfect shot. SI took about 19,000 at the Superbowl. With those numbers you can see why they get such great images.

3/20/2007 3:01:20 PM

Paul S. Fleming

member since: 4/27/2008
  Cindy, As usual great answers from the members. My tip: Before you set sail get to know that new camera of yours inside, outside, upside down and completely and don't forget to stow your new camera's instruction manual in your camera bag so you can take images in the dark if you have to. Better to have it and not need it than vise versa. Bon Voyage. "ps" Fleming

3/20/2007 3:47:22 PM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
19,000, eh?

Imagine you are SI's photo editor, and you've got ONE hour to find and edit the 20 best out of that lot.... Mags have deadlines!

An enviable job?

3/20/2007 3:54:23 PM

dave S

member since: 1/13/2007
  hi cindy, try to find the largest flash chip you can get for your camera. cruise ships have computers that are accessible for the passengers. you will be able to download them and burn to a disc.also they have internet access make sure you have your usb cable that came with the camera, charger, some dvd's or cd, depending on what their comp's have. if their internet access is available, you will be able to upload and email to your home email addresas. hope this is helpfull.

3/20/2007 7:29:45 PM

Dale M. Garvey

member since: 3/13/2006
  Dave's advice is good if you don't have a problem with the card. (If a smaller card goes bad you stand to loose fewer photos,) I shoot 2 gig cards. I have had to use a rescue disk program several times. Disks go bad if you fail to turn off the camera when you install or remove the card or when the batteries of the camera are nearly exhausted. If you are taking a laptop you might consider loading getting such a program (about $25)

Nikons are faily good in the auto mode but you can do so much better setting your own ISO (film speed). For example at the Capt's dinner it will be darker than on the deck. Photos without flash might be more attractive than with flash. Setting an ISO of 1250 or 1600 might give you professional looking shots. In very bright light you might have to dial a ISO of 200.
The ship's photographer might help you if you have a problem.

3/20/2007 7:55:03 PM

Maureen Jackson

member since: 2/24/2007
  Hi Cindy. I did this trip lasy year. A silly little tip - take a plastic refuse bag a) to lie on in the snow and ice b) to cover your gear if it rains/fog etc. Another tip - if not a tri/mono pod, how about a good beanbag? Everyone's right - take plenty plenty memory cards. Have a great one. I did.

3/21/2007 12:33:18 AM

Cindy Sj
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/27/2007
  .....ok....a huge thanks to everyone that has added to this thread....what i've learned is exactly how much I HAVE TO LEARN about digital media....which is a gargantuan amount!!! [= Luckily I'll have a week in April that I can concentrate on learning the new camera before leaving in May... and THANKS to all folks with info about tripods, memory cards, laptops and the wolverine thing....I still have to figure out what that one is!!

mary s, I'm curious what ship you'll be on...perhaps we'll be bobbing around out there together!

maureen J...what the heck is a beanbag?? Am I missing something obvious?!

Dale G ~ frighteningly enough, I don't know a thing about raw formats yet, although I kind of get the gist that it's a file that covers most options on the camera that you can edit on your computer?? How would you recommend I experiment with this setting in my week off? I live near the San Diego Wild Animal Park, so I think that's where I'll go to mess with the camera... If I set an ISO of 1250, won't I need a tripod? (no laughing...told you I only know a wee bit...) [=

Due to funding issues I have just one lens currently...so that will have to do for now, but I will study my memory card/battery situation much more closely now.
Can I use a portable external drive without a laptop? I own a laptop, but sadly it's called the craptop because all it ever does is make up it's own rules and then quit, so it does NOT get the luxury of going on holiday with me!
Again thanks everyone, and keep the info coming!! I'm learning loads!!

3/21/2007 8:35:38 AM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
"what the heck is a beanbag?"

http://www.web-nat.com/bic/ont/tips26.html
For travel you can leave it empty – so it's tiny in your suitcase – whilst you can fill it up when you get to your location with dry beans, rice, polystyrene, or similar.

"about raw formats [yet], although I kind of get the gist that it's a file that covers most options on the camera that you can edit on your computer?"

Correct.

"How would you recommend I experiment with this setting in my week off? I live near the San Diego Wild Animal Park, so I think that's where I'll go to mess with the camera... "

Set your cam to shoot "RAW+". That way you'll get both a JPG file and a RAW file from each exposure. So you can choose later which you want to use.

"If I set an ISO of 1250, won't I need a tripod? (no laughing...told you I only know a wee bit...) [="

Indeed, you won't need a tripod. But you will TERRIBLY GRAINY photos.
Better keep the ISO at 100 or 200.

"Due to funding issues I have just one lens currently...so that will have to do for now,"

On a cruise to Alaska taking only one lens is a BIIIIG mistake!
Try to beg, borrow, steal, or rent a good zoom lens for the cruise, because you will hit yourself if you haven't got one!

"Can I use a portable external drive without a laptop?"

Yes. These don't require a laptop: http://www.steves-digicams.com/digi_accessories.html#storage.
But all of those are a LOOOOT more expensive than having 2 good cards and using either http://www.yousendit.com/, or http://www.pando.com/.

Test it! Send a BIIIG file (photos zipped together) to your own eMail address. It's very convenient. And FREE!

Good luck!

3/21/2007 9:14:48 AM

  HI CINDY,
All of the advise above is excellent and you should read and reread it and make choices according to budget but don't forget you spent a lot to get there so be sure to a backup camera even if used or inexpensive point and shoot, just in case you drop yours overboard (it happens). Dress for the weather. As much memory as cost allows (you will never regret this and can reuse when home). On my trip to the Tundra to photograph polarbears I also took an EZdigiMagic that burns DVD's (weight less than a pound) and 1 or 2 DVD/day shooting. You can put 2GB on most DVD and you have your backup instantly each day or to free-up space on the CF or memory cards. Empty Bean bag but you can make one easily and fill with anything once on board. Battey charger for sure, If only one lens make it a zoom but a wideangle is great for scenery if shooting wildlife you will need the telephoto. Get lowest F/stop possible for lowlight time if you can afford it. If you have a laptop ie Apple or PC take it with you. One of the things we found most convienient but no one ever mentions is a multiplug cord so you can use the computer, burn the DVD and recharge the battey at sametime unless you know you will have plenty of outlets. I started making my list months before I went, got my suitcase out and began arranging the items. Some stuff did not make the cut. Tripod. Never missed it. Have a great time and bring back plenty of memories and remember it is not just about getting the shot but that is nice if it occurs it is about having fun. Wish I was there.Emile

3/27/2007 3:09:16 PM

Cindy Sj
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/27/2007
  emile ~
thanks for the summary of all the great (but sometimes confusing) recommendations above. You've just done my dream trip AND purchased my dream laptop!! (currently I own what I call the "craptop"...it crashed constantly, so I trust it with nothing) It's about a month until we leave, so it's crunch time.... I've got a h20proof throwaway for my snorkling in sitka, my nikon p4 for point and shoot, 2 lenses for the d80 (18-135mm and 70-300mm)... 3 2gig memory cards, camera backpack, 2 batteries (reckon since it's a cruise, I can recharge each evening...), circular polarizer.... regarding backup, I'll have the techno-genius i'm married to read the info on the EZdigimagic....he'll be making the decision regarding backup equipment. Oh, and planning on taking a powerstrip to keep all the stuff charged and running! I still have to check ot the file sending sites... one of the biggest drawbacks for our "readiness" plan is budget, so we're attempting to weigh options carefully. By the way, love the photos of the left and right handed rigging...

4/5/2007 1:25:08 PM

Dale M. Garvey

member since: 3/13/2006
  The only thing left is to share some of your great shots when you return.

4/5/2007 1:50:53 PM

Bill Chachkes
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/26/2006
  Cindy!! If your Laptop is that bad(i'm assuming were talking PC here) GO GET A MAC!!!(sry to shout, but i'm so passionate about this!) I have Like, so little $$ to spend because my Niece is getting married 7/7, and then we are going away after that, and my Laptop died(7 Year old Apple iBook-about a week after this thread started!) well,..I replaced it with the Exact same one from Craigslist for 60 Dollars, and transferred my Battery, Ram, and wireless card over from the dead one! Walla! Now,.i don't suggest you do what I did, but if all you need is to store Pics and send a few e-mails from whereever on the ship they provide wireless(not all ships have wired or wireless connections in room) you don't need much, and can get a good Used Mac portable for Less then 500(well under if you shop) Dollars..
Do this and you will have a "craptop" no more...I got mine(orig one) used in 2002, and it lasted me 5 years!! (oh the alternative to "The List" is eBay!!! Anyway, good luck and we want to hear all about the trip(and see pics in your gallery!!!) when you get back!!!

Bill
(owner of 11 macs(5 in storage for parts) the ones running are!!
1 Intel Mini, 1 G4 Mini, one G4 Cube, 1 G4 Quicksilver tower, 1 G4 eMac, and my adorable little G3 clamshell(rev 2!)

Officer of Metromac(NYC users Group)

4/5/2007 6:47:01 PM

Cindy Sj
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/27/2007
 
 
  at sea
at sea
f10, 1/250, iso125. not a cloud, not a wave...what a strange photo....
 
 
I'm baaaaaaaack!! waaaaaaaaaaaaah!! It was a gorgeous trip... but as usual, there was equipment failure! I just got my d80 at xmas, and the 18-135mm lens it came with broke on the cruise!! It's a darn good thing I listened to all you folks and went and purchased a 2nd lens, or it would have been a frustrating holiday. So thank you. I did shoot raw, but also shot these jpegs for quick use...actually I have no idea what to do with the raw photos...all I have is iphoto for a program currently. I'll be saving up for either Photoshop elements or aperature in the near future. I've attached a few photos that are unaltered...i would absolutely LOVE for y'all to critique your heads off... and thanks again!

6/1/2007 11:51:56 AM

Robyn Gwilt
BetterPhoto Member
robyngphotography.com

member since: 7/15/2005
  Hey CIndy, I watched this thread with envy - sounds like a trip of a lifetime. Your pix look good so far!!! So give us more info - what happened with the original lens (how'd it break), what was your second lens, did you take a tripod/monopod, how many memory cards, back-up? Did you take a laptop/Mac/dvd writer? How did weather/cold affect your camera? Look forward to seeing more pix!

6/1/2007 12:27:54 PM

Kathy Silver
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/31/2006
  Hi Cindy - I've been following your question /answer on your cruise to Alaska. I just returned too. It was so awesome. Sorry to hear that you had equipment failure. Did you use a tripod or monopod on the ship - I used a monopod with my 100-400 IS lens but still had blurred photos. All other shots with my other lens came out great. I took over 1500 shots and I'm still going through them. How about you? Hope you enjoyed your trip as much as I did :)

6/1/2007 2:24:50 PM

Cindy Sj
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/27/2007
  Robyn ~ the mystery of the breaking lens...well, it's still a mystery. It started with a wee squeak while autofocusing, which turned into a squelch, which turned into a painful grinding noise (like ball bearings with no grease rubbing), then it gave up altogether. ]= Quite a surprising early demise, considering we had perfect weather on this cruise...so it wasn't due to cold or rain exposure! I took it to my local Calumet, and they've sent it packing back to Nikon to be repaired under warranty...I ended up shooting the last half of the trip with my tamron 70-300mm, which limited my shooting and was tricky at times, but it was better than watching the scenery go floating, flying or running by without getting a thing! Due to monstrous budget restrictions, I ended up taking 4 2 gig memory cards and having the ship's photo department burn the one really "important" card (the one with the dogsledding pix) onto cd for me. I left the "craptop" (aka crappy laptop) at home, because I think it's at the point of being less reliable than the weatherman....who said it would be raining every day of the cruise...it only drizzled for a few hours twice! temps 50-65f....lovely. You shouldn't pass up the opportunity to go to Alaska.. we scrimped and saved and are thrilled we did. But I see you have a distance issue. Have you done the Chilean Fjords? They offer some of the same coastal beauty... my mother took me on a South American cruise 2 years ago (she didn't want to go alone..what great gift, eh?) and it was also beautiful.. But speaking of beautiful, your photos are just gorgeous....actually, inspiration is a better word!

Mary ~ Hope you're not experiencing withdrawls like we are!! [= I miss the sound of the sea while falling asleep, someone asking me if I want fresh ground pepper on my salads...sigh!! My husband had the same issue as you with his larger lens..it was a something-300mm and he attempted to use a doubler, with frustrating results. I didn't use a monopod or tripod, but he used a gorillapod, and for longer exposures with shorter lenses off the ship, he was pleased. I took about 500 photos....I'd LOVE to see what you shot, and hear what excursions you took and what you saw. As my profile states, I'm a rank beginner to digital photography and would love to learn from someone who also did a cruise! (and had a room at the back of the ship...like we did!) Email me directly and we can swap stories, so that we don't bore others here. I think you just click the "contact cindy" button. I've gone through most of my photos, but haven't altered any of them....I don't have any photo software currently, just iphoto. That's the next project!

6/1/2007 4:19:52 PM

Robyn Gwilt
BetterPhoto Member
robyngphotography.com

member since: 7/15/2005
  HI CIndy - thanks for the great update - it sounds divine, but 500 pix - you must have held back - I can shoot about 1000 in a weekend in the bush! LOL Yes distance and cash is a bugger - so whether its Alaska or South American or China........ (sigh)!!! If you don't have an editing programme - why don't you d/l from Google, their free programme Picasa - its better than nothing, and I'm sure that some minor adjustments will make your pix 'pop' even more - try it and let us see the results - thanks for your kind comments on my gallery - look forward to seeing some more of Alaska.

6/1/2007 8:54:47 PM

Bill Chachkes
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/26/2006
  Hi Cindy and welcome back. Glad you had a great time. Pics look quite nice. Hopefully I get there some day. Why were some of your Pics Blurry with the 70-300?? My wife and I can't afford the "Big Kahuna"- a 300-800 Sigma that we want for our E-volt 500, but we got a 50-500 & a 100-300 to go with the 14-45 & 40-150 that came with the package. I took 220 Shots last wekend at the Jones Beach Air Show and that was just 5 Hrs! you only took 500 on a Whole trip??? Well I Guess Quality beats Quantity anytime. Glad you had a good time despite the Lens failure.

6/2/2007 6:39:31 AM

Richard 
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 4/28/2005
  Have fun. I live in Juneau, Alaska.

6/2/2007 7:30:24 AM

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Photography Question 
Sean Page

member since: 1/30/2007
  7 .  Settings for City Photographs
I am getting the opportunity to take some pics of old buildings in the city I live in for a calendar. I was wondering what type of lighting and settings I should use. I use a Canon Rebel XTi.

3/14/2007 1:12:39 PM

Ariel Lepor
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2005
  Shoot when the sun is kind of low in the sky and behind you. That gives a better exposure for both the buildings and the sky, and the shadows are more dramatic.

3/14/2007 1:44:17 PM

Sean Page

member since: 1/30/2007
  thanks that is a great idea.

3/14/2007 6:03:39 PM

Samuel Smith
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/21/2004
  11 months to go.in one month you can have 12 visions,or 20.30.concept or vision?you live there,talk to the locals.

3/15/2007 10:53:00 PM

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Photography Question 
Trudy Hite

member since: 12/31/2005
  8 .  Portrait Photography at the Beach
I am having a terrible time getting good beach photos without people squinting. Because we live in the south, even the morning and evening sun this time of year is harsh. I read putting the light behind the subject and using a flash is a possibility. If you do this, wouldn't you use a diffuser on the flash? Also, where can you buy a large handheld diffuser to block out the harsh sun (for shooting with the sun behind me), and is this a better method? I have a helper to hold it.

8/20/2006 6:35:47 PM

anonymous A. 

member since: 9/19/2005
  Both methods work, and there is no real need for a diffuser for fill flash, Trudy. With the sun behind your subjects you may find that the reflection from a sandy beach provides all the fill you need, but a reflector (held by that assistant of yours) is a very good option, and probably better than your flash, though you could use both together.
Whenever squinting is a problem, you can tell your subjects to close their eyes and then open them on your count so you can catch them at the prime moment.
I have also seen sun shelters set up on the beach to handle conditions like these... large, white, translucent car-port sized... you can buy them for about $80 from hardware stores and the like.

8/21/2006 5:15:00 AM

Jerry Frazier

member since: 6/6/2005
  You get about 15 minutes at sunset. That's the best time. Use that light. It's nice and orange. Use side lighting and casual relaxed portrait poses.

Then, as a last shot, just as the sun is setting, put them in front of the light, and blast some flash. Makes a beautiful portrait.

8/21/2006 11:45:56 AM

Cheryl Kennedy Hines
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/27/2005
 
 
 
I have found that the best beach photography pictures I have seen as well as shot, have been on an overcast day in the evening with totally natural light. This keeps there from being any shadowing on the face, as well as squinting. The outcome of the overall natural setting proves to be a great picture.

8/22/2006 11:18:47 AM

James Gray

member since: 3/5/2008
  This may be too little wayyyyyy too late, but I have a method that was shown to me that might help. I get my subjects in the position that I want and then have them close their eyes and relax. I count down from 5 and when they open their eyes tere is about 2 seconds before they start squinting again. I can ususally get the shots I want from this technique. Hope it helps.

3/11/2008 7:13:36 AM

John Sandstedt
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/8/2001
  Most everyone says take your pictures before 10:00 AM and after 4:00 PM to get the best lighting. At best, often that's impossible at the beach..

So, don't position your subject with sun directly in front of or directly behind your subject. With the sun radiating from the left or rigth, you can use a gobo [as simple as a white towel] held on the other side to reflect the sun back to your subject. You'll need to experiment with gobo distance to the subject. You may want to bracket. You may want to use a polarizer or neutral desnsity filter to better control the light.

3/13/2008 9:10:56 AM

Christopher A. Walrath
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 4/25/2006
  Anothe trick I use is to have everybody look at me, remember where I am and then close their eyes. Count three and tell them that when you get to two ask them to open their eyes until after you say three. And make sure you don't take long getting to three. Using didgtal, make sure all eyes are open. Using film, you have your shot lined up so the second you see everyone's eyes open, trip the shutter. You'll see that better with your eyes than through the viewfinder. Hope you get'em.

Thanks
Chris

3/14/2008 3:24:29 PM

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Photography Question 
Susan Eginton

member since: 3/16/2005
  9 .  Hazy Cityscapes
I was on a cruise around New York Harbor recently and took some photos of the skyline. Unfortunately, there was a hazy sky obscuring the top of the buildings in some cases. I did not know how to compensate for this. Any suggestions?

11/18/2005 6:50:31 PM

Pete H
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/9/2005
  A UV or haze filter can help some. Generally, heavy haze is not a resolvable problem with the exception of post-processing. The key to great cityscapes is patience. :)
Pete

11/18/2005 8:10:24 PM

Justin S.

member since: 11/21/2004
  You could try to use a circle polarizer to cut out a considerable amout of the haze and add pop to that blue sky.

11/21/2005 8:27:14 PM

Susan Eginton

member since: 3/16/2005
  Thanks for the suggestions.
Susan

11/25/2005 7:26:01 PM

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Photography Question 
Helen N. McHugh
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2005
  10 .  Best Zoom Lens for Travel Holiday?
I'm going to Rome in November and just want to take one lens. Iam thinking of buying the Canon 28-300 3.5-5.6L (for full-frame camera). I would appreciate any advice!

10/7/2005 3:44:13 AM

Justin G.
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/13/2004
  If you can afford that then go for it. You can't beat the focal length range and its L designation. But don't forget ... it's a push/pull zoom, not your usual twist type zoom. Some people don't like this. I've never tried it, but I'm not sure if I would like it. I would recommend renting it for a day from somewhere and seeing if you really like it. I was going to recommend the 28-135 for a lot less price. But if you have $2100, by all means try it if you won't mind the push/pull factor.

10/7/2005 4:53:21 AM

Helen N. McHugh
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2005
  Justin,
Thanks for your advice! I have never used a push/pull zoom, so it may not be the ideal lens. I will now definitely "try before I buy"! The 28-135 sounds good, will definitely look at it. Thanks again.

10/7/2005 5:28:50 AM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  The biggest problem with using the EF 28-300L as a travel lens is its size. It is very heavy to carry as a tourist (over 3.5 pounds), and its long length (7.2" at its shortest zoom) and white paint mean it's not a very discrete lens. It's intended more for professional photojournalists. If that doesn't put you off, then go for it.
Alternatively, you can cover the same range with as good or better optics and less total weight and cost with a 2-lens set - such as Justin's suggestion of the EF 28-135 IS, and either the EF 70-300 f/4.5-5.6 DO IS USM or the newly released EF 70-300 f/4-5.6 IS USM.

10/7/2005 5:50:36 AM

Andy 
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/28/2002
  Since you are touring in a city, I think you need the wide angle end more often. The EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM is my first choice. The IS feature is extremely useful in low-light situations. My other choices are the EF 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 USM (less expensive, lighter but no IS) or the Tamron 28-200mm f/3.8-5.6 Asph. XR IF Macro (very light weight, less expensive and cover more).

10/7/2005 6:46:49 AM

Helen N. McHugh
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2005
  Jon& Andy,

Thank you both for you replies!
The 28-135f/3.5-5.6USM(IS)is looking like the best for city photography.
Must have a look at the Tamron 28-200,
light weight & more cover sounds good!

10/7/2005 7:10:46 AM

Steve Parrott
LightAnon.com

member since: 9/4/2004
  I own the 28 - 300 L Canon zoom. You do NOT want it for a "vacation" lens. Much too heavy and big. I also HIGHLY DISLIKE the push pull operation. To be honest, my lens has been sitting in it's bag, unused for over a year. I also dislike the slow 5.6 apature at max zoom. The 70-200 2.8 IS L zoom is a MUCH better lens. It's speed plus image stabilization make available light photos much easier. It is also a "normal" ring type zoom. The 28-300 is not very highly regarded amoung Canon lenses... that should tell you something.

10/11/2005 12:38:53 PM

Helen N. McHugh
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2005
  Steve,
Thank you so much for you reply! I think you have saved me from making a very expensive mistake!The 28-300 L seemed like the ideal(good quality) "Cover all" lens!I will definitely try the 70-200
2.8 IS L Zoom. will post my final choice & hopefully up load some photos of Rome sometime in November!

Thanks so much!

Helen

10/11/2005 1:27:10 PM

Lewis T. Beasimer
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/30/2003
  The last time I was in Rome I only had two lenses. The EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM and the EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM. The lens I used most often was the 28-135mm and had great results. There were plenty of dimly lit areas that the IS came in handy, and the wide angle aspect is useful for capturing all those really BIG ruins.

The 70-200mm 2.8 IS L is a good lens, but if you only want one lens I'd suggest going wider for this beautiful city. Enjoy Rome!

10/11/2005 10:10:06 PM

Helen N. McHugh
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2005
  Lewis,

I really appreciate your reply! The EF
28-135mm f/3.5 with IS, looks very promising! Must get to the dealer soon and have a play!

Thank you for your good wishes!

10/12/2005 2:07:25 AM

anonymous A. 

member since: 9/19/2005
  I took my EOS 5 and Sigma 28-300mm to Rome last year. It's a great combination for this work; I'm 60, walked everywhere and didn't notice the weight. Oh, and the Sigma is a twist-to-zoom lens.

10/12/2005 4:39:44 AM

Helen N. McHugh
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2005
  David,

Thanks for your reply!I really like the idea of the wider range! 28-300mm!
Also the reasonable weight is very important when sightseeing!
I will definitely have a look at this lens when I visit the retailer!

Many thanks!

10/12/2005 5:04:51 AM

Bob Mepham

member since: 10/7/2000
  Well Helen, you certainly are getting a lot of great feedback. My insights are from the perspective of someone who uses a 35 mm film camera, but some of my experience may be helpful.

As an avid vacation photographer (Europe, Asia, Africa), I am wed to the 28-200 zoom as my primary lens for travel. I happened to buy the ProMaster but the Tamron would also have done the job nicely. Price was the determining factor, but I am hugely satisfied with the picture quality.

If I can add one aspect to the discussion, the dilemma with these zoom lenses is their need for reasonable light levels. While flash is an option most of the time (don't forget to remove the lens hood when using the flash or else you will have a lens hood shadow in your pictures when they are taken at 28 mm ), there are occasions where flash is inappropriate or nor permitted. I have tried to solve this challenge by packing in my bag a fast 28 mm (f1.8) and 50 mm (f1.7) lens for low light situations. They are inexpensive, compact and do not add much weight.

I have also found that the slowness of the zoom lenses can be compensated for in part by using faster film. My primary film is Fuji 400, but then I rarely enlarge a picture beyond an 8x12.

Hope my personal experiences help you with your trip. Rome is a fantastic city, though in November, the likelihood of poorer weather increases and low light photography becomes more of an issue. Have a wonderful time.

10/12/2005 7:51:37 AM

Helen N. McHugh
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2005
  Bob,
You are right,the feedback has been amazing!I just would not get this wonderful advice at the camera shop!
You are right about the poorer weather in November, so I guess the fast primes would be a good idea! But I do like the idea of the 28-200 or 300!
I am leaning so much, thanks to you all!

Thank you for your good wishes! Just can't wait for to see this wondeful city!

10/12/2005 11:25:05 AM

Justin G.
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/13/2004
  Well Helen if you're leaning then put your other shoe on!!!!!! just playin with ya. I hope you have a ball in rome. my wife and I are going to try and visit her brother in england sometime soon. lemme know how europe is!

10/12/2005 2:01:35 PM

Justin G.
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/13/2004
  Well Helen if you're leaning then put your other shoe on!!!!!! just playin with ya. I hope you have a ball in rome. my wife and I are going to try and visit her brother in england sometime soon. lemme know how europe is!

10/12/2005 2:01:36 PM

Justin G.
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/13/2004
  Well Helen if you're leaning then put your other shoe on!!!!!! just playin with ya. I hope you have a ball in rome. my wife and I are going to try and visit her brother in england sometime soon. lemme know how europe is!

10/12/2005 2:01:36 PM

Lewis T. Beasimer
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/30/2003
  I see no problem getting advice from a source like betterphoto.com as there is a lot of good advise to be found.

On the other hand, if you do not get this type of advice from your camera shop, you are shopping at the wrong place. Our local camera super store has people that know their stuff with high prices to boot. I tend to shop B & H photo on the web. They have a number where you can call and speak with knowledgeable sales staff for recommendations. I've been pleased by their suggestions.

As for low light situations, there are plenty of those in Rome without worrying about the weather. A fast lens or IS will come in real handy.

10/13/2005 5:51:13 AM

Helen N. McHugh
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2005
  Justin,
Thanks for your good wishes!Hope to post some photos on return so you can see how Europe is looking!

10/13/2005 9:09:58 AM

Helen N. McHugh
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2005
  Justin,
Thanks for your good wishes!Hope to post some photos on return so you can see how Europe is looking!

10/13/2005 9:11:29 AM

Justin G.
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/13/2004
  aww thanks so much helen!

10/13/2005 9:46:26 AM

Helen N. McHugh
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2005
  Lewis,
Thanks for getting back again!
The staff at the local photographic store are very helpful, but I think one gets a more unbiased opinion from forums like Better Photo.Com!??
Shopping on the web is definitely cheaper!
Having looked at your website I think I will settle for the 28-125mm IS + a
fast prime! Your view of Rome is stunning! I will do my best to get some good shots!

10/13/2005 10:45:33 AM

Lewis T. Beasimer
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/30/2003
  Thanks for your words of encouragement.

I've been reading articles on the just released EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM. There are some differences between this one and the 28-135 IS but I think it may be an L option worth looking at. I have no personal experience with the new lens, but I've yet to be disappointed by any of my L lenses.

I look forward to enjoying your view of Rome.

10/14/2005 5:59:21 AM

Norbert Maile

member since: 7/28/2004
  Keep in mind that "L" glass is the best you can get. The old saying is, " The shot is omly as good as your glass". Not completely true but not far off either. If you can find something in "L" glass, get it! It will last you a lifetime.

10/18/2005 9:37:26 PM

  Hi Helen
I was wondering what lens you decided to go with. I am going to Rome in May and am looking at the 28-135 USM IS lens (right now I just have the kit Digital Rebel lens 18-55). Also, how was your trip?!
Lynn

2/12/2006 2:46:53 PM

anonymous A. 

member since: 9/19/2005
  Well, Helen, November is long gone...what did you settle on, and how was the trip? Do you have any Roman photos to share with us? Love to see them... by the way, there are photos from Rome in my gallery if they would help Lynn decide: sunsets on Page 6, a couple of interiors of the Vatican on Page 6. Also, any pictures taken with the Canon EOS A2E would have been made with a 28-300mm and the same lens is now fitted to my 20D, so any pictures taken with the Canon digital were shot with this, except the macros. A similar lens was used for nearly all the Pentax shots. Hope they give you some idea of whether or not a similar lens would work for you.
David

2/12/2006 5:45:49 PM

Helen N. McHugh
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2005
  Hello Lynn!
Sorry that it has taken so long to respond,but our first grandson was born on the 6th February 2006 & we have
just about got back to "normal" life now !! We had a wondeful trip to Rome in November - Just one rainy day ! I settled for the 28-135 USM IS in the end . That was the only lens I used! The IS is a real bonus for shots inside the Vatican & the Sistine Chapel!Flash is not allowed inside these historic buildings & I was amazed
at how clear the photos looked! This lens would be a good compliment to your 18-55 lens on your digital Rebel.Just a note , I was lucky enough to receive the Canon EOS 5D as a Christmas/birthday gift so I am thinking of investing in some "L" lenses as the full frame sensor is unforgiving with some of the "consumer " lenses! I will post some of the photo shortly! Have a wonderful trip & let us know what lens you decide on! Helen.

4/6/2006 6:39:21 AM

Helen N. McHugh
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2005
  David, as you can see from my response to Lynn , my life has changed somewhat since the arrival of my first grandson in February!, hence the delay in responding to you! Accompanied by my husband,we had a wonderful holiday in Rome, last November. What an amazing city - so much to see! Having settled for the 28-135 IS Canon lens ,I was very happy with the resulting photographs, especially those taken without flash! The IS is a godsend! Just been looking through your gallery- some amazing shots there!You are a well travelled man! Your 28-300mm lens is excellent! Is it the Canon lens? I have thought about buying this lens but the size & weight put me off! Do you find it heavy? I will post some photos of the trip soon! Helen

4/6/2006 7:09:34 AM

anonymous A. 

member since: 9/19/2005
  Hello Helen. Congratulations, Grandma! My 28-300 is isn't a Canon (couldn't afford one)~ it's a Tamron. I'm in my 60s, so if weight were an issue I guess I'd know by now, but I don't find it a problem. I think balance is more important than weight. Can't wait to see your photos.

4/6/2006 2:24:42 PM

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