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Photography QnA: Digital Cameras

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Category: Best Photographic Equipment to Buy : Digital Cameras and Accessories : Digital Cameras

Interested in the consumer rating of digital cameras? How about some digital camera comparisons? Check out this Q&A for everything you wanted to know about digital cameras. Also, be sure to check out our cool digital camera calculators and digital camera comparison charts.

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Photography Question 
Stan Kwasniowski
BetterPhoto Member
Contact Stan
Stan's Gallery

member since: 7/30/2003
  31 .  Digital vs Medium Format Slide Film
I'm torn between digital and slide photography, and am thinking of selling my Hasselblad system and my Pentax system and going to digital. Should I? And if I do what type of digital camera should I purchase? I still have a Nikon system (n8000S, and my favorite Nikon F, yes F which I love to shoot with and the lens to go with this camera) any suggestions would be appreciated.

2/13/2004 1:17:56 PM

Wing Wong
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/8/2004
  Hi Stan,

Does your hasselblad have a interchangable back which might be compatible with one of the digital backs available? I'm assuming the hasselblad you have is medium format.(see www.luminous-landscape.com)

Depending on what kinds of pics you want to shoot and what kind of lens/equipment you want to use, the choice is far ranging.

Hasselblad's H1 is a nice medium format digital camera body which will work great with the Kodak DCS Pro Back and the Phase One digital backs. So is the Mamiya 645.

Take a look at luminous-landscape.com, dpreview.com, and steves-digicams.com to get an idea of which cameras can do what in relation to your needs.

Good luck!

2/14/2004 10:25:30 AM

  Thank you Wing for your kind thoughts, I will look into the sights you suggest. And it is a medium format, Its a 500ELM a moon camera that came out in 1979 and their were 1500 only manufactured, my number is 0174 of the 1500 that were made. I still have the orginal box it came in, the Hasselblad pencil, key chain and gold slide.
Again, thank you for your opinion, never thought of that.

2/14/2004 10:44:24 AM

Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member
cammphoto.com

member since: 7/17/2003
  If you want to go digital. You should check out Nikon's D-100. You can use the same lenses as you currently use on your other Nikon bodies... (assuming that they are not pre-AI models).

I'd definately hang on to that vintage Hassy!

2/14/2004 12:55:49 PM

  Bob, thank you for your comments, you know I had just looked into the freezer and seen all that slide film Velveta etc. for my Blad and stared to think maybe I will keep the Blad, Its expensive to operate using slide film which is all I use that for, I think I will hold on to it and use up all that film first, and maybe now think to sell my pentex system and go from there, again thank you.

2/14/2004 1:24:47 PM

Terry L. Long

member since: 2/12/2004
  Why not keep both the Hassy and the Pentax and STILL go digital. You could get a nice dedicated film scanner for less than the price of the digital back. Look at the latest Nikons for MF. I ended up going with a Canon FS 4000US for 35mm and the Epson 3200 for MF and LF (slides). They're ok but, the Nikon would probably be much better... espically for the MF transpencies.

2/14/2004 4:13:05 PM

  Thank you Terry, I think I may go this way as you suggest, I think I will sell my pentex system and buy what you suggested. Or else buy a small digital camera for fooling around and have the best of both worlds. Well at least for now.

2/14/2004 8:05:50 PM


BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/28/2003
  I too was a little interested in digital, but had a lot invested in film equipment. So, I wound up purchasing a high grade consumer model digital camera, the Canon Digital Rebel. It has some draw backs from the pro model, but I saved some cash, and it is good enough for experimentation.

I am glad I did that because I am not too impressed by digital. One thing was I thought I could use it to check exposure settings, especailly when using studio strobes, but it seems to read light differently from film, so it's a waste of time for that.

It's a good medium for some things. I could see myself taking it on a trip while travelling. It would be a strong advantage not to have to fumble around with film.

2/15/2004 3:11:26 AM

  Thanks Jerry, as getting all these comments and evaluating them, thinking of what I could get for my Blad etc, I am going to do as you did, buy myself a Canon A80 and try it out, for my personal use and go from there. Over the last few years I have been photographing at the Calgary Stampede each July, both rodeo, and people. This year I thought I would try digital and see how it goes. Nice thing about digital is that I will try it out the first few days and if it is not to my expectations, then back to the Nikon with slide film. As you say, fumbling with film just as a great ride is in progress, and nice thing is you can see it, but can't load fast enough to catch it on film.

2/16/2004 9:16:51 AM

Robert Bridges

member since: 5/12/2003
  If you are primarily shooting action shots then you need a camera with alot of capture space....its expensive I know but look at the Nikon D2h or D1h - they are expressly made for sports shooters. As for moving from hassleblad to digital....
first you gotta remember you are going from 6x6 to a much smaller frame. 2)
If your hassy is in mint condition you would be nuts to sell it. With those lenses
and body......I don't know. Your choice but god I'd hate to part with it if it was me especially for a plastic canon.

2/17/2004 4:02:58 PM

  Robert, thank you for your intrest. I have reconsidered my decision from your comments and others that I received. I am going to hold on to my Hasselblad. I guess its too hard to let go, after all these years that I have had it. May I say that I looked over your websight adn so enjoyed your photographs, these are the type that I like to take,
In fact all the people that had websights I looked at, gosh there are some lovely photographs, they are like magic when I opened up your sight.

Thank You All for your comments, I really appreciated them. I will still buy a digital, have been reading up on them, they sound marvelous, but like Jerry F. said, good for traveling and holidays.

Again to all "Thank You"

2/18/2004 7:31:46 PM

Robert Bridges

member since: 5/12/2003
  Stan,

Thanks for your kind comments! I can use a plug now and then. I doubt that you will regret holding on to your hasselblad. I've got an old Canon F1n that is at least 20 yrs old that I still use now and then. I also have a 4x5 that I would not consider dumping inspite of how expensive film is for it and how much of a pain it is to lug around. Digital is here to stay and no doubt the camera's will get better and cheaper
as the bugs are worked out. Even given that, however, I think it will be a long long
time before it becomes economically feasible for the vast majority of us to have
medium format much less large format digital camera's. Photoshop et al aside there is something magical about looking at a 6x6 or 4x5 chrome that just can't be beat! Good luck with your work and by all means have a blast with what ever digital camera you end up with! Thanks again for your comments and I will keep my eye out for your work.

Rob Bridges

2/18/2004 10:21:51 PM

Piper Lehman
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/20/2001
  Hi Stan. I agree with Rob. You'll need the extra space -- but more importantly, I think you'll need the speed of a higher-end DSLR for any sort of sports/action shooting. Consumer digital compacts are poster children for shutter lag. I would definitely look at the D2H in the Nikon line-up. Supposed to be the fastest gun in the west... or so I've been told. I shoot with the D100 and I've had no real problem shooting action yet. I shoot a lot of marathons and sports events and have not had to curse at my baby just yet. One more thing, you should consider purchasing the largest memory card with the fastest write speed you can swing. Lexar and SanDisk make excellent CF cards -- I've also used the Ritek/Ridata 512mb cards with no problems. I still can't force myself to spend $200+ for a 1gig card, so I carry 2 512mb cards and shoot conservatively.

I've also had a hard time giving up film shooting. I still have my N90s, but I haven't used once it in almost a year. If I did, I'm sure the film would just sit around until I forgot about it--never getting processed. It's hard to let go, but we must be strong and move on! :) Ha.
Hope this helps some. Good luck with your decision.

3/25/2004 3:58:10 PM

  Hi Piper, sorry for not replying sooner, and I agree with you, I have been looking at the D70 which just came out, the problem is that this is so popular and demand so great not many around. I have an F90 and thought of using these lens on D70 for my shooting. I usually shoot the Calgary Sampede every July and was thinking if I do get a D70 to go for 256 for a start, again, dont know much about digital, going high definition. I only want to get a few good shots. I dont shoot rodeo any more sick of that, but have been shooting people,other events at the Stampede. And as you say, that slide film in freeze has to be used up,
thank you Piper for your comments and your website very nice, Congratulations

3/30/2004 9:22:21 PM

Derek Holyhead

member since: 12/26/2003
  Hi Stan,
Just one thing I would like to add from my own experience, I don't know how the D70 compares with the D100 but I was in a simular position except I already had a range of Canon lenses and a EOS600 film camera so I purchased a Digital Rebel just to 'try' digital and Piper is right I have not used my EOS600 since! The point I am trying to make is I now wish I had bought a EOS10D because it does have more Pro features than the Rebel and I feel like I have spent $1000.00 that I could have used towards the 10D. Don't get me wrong the Rebel is a superb camera and the main thing I miss over my EOS600 (and EOS10D) is the ability to choose the focusing method rather than the camera deciding for me. So check out the features of both the D70 and D100 and buy the best you can afford because trying digital will mean the end of of film (35mm anyhow - maybe not your medium format stuff)and you will be better off with decent camera now than have to upgrade later. Just my two pennies worth. Good luck and enjoy.
Regards,
Del

3/31/2004 6:58:03 AM


BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/28/2003
  I agree with Del. I did exactly the same thing. I like my digital rebel, but wish I had forked over the cash for a pro digital camera. One of the features that I thought I was getting, but didn't get, was the ability to use studio lighting. I need that and really wanted that. Also, my rebel doesn;t handle flash well. I use Metz. Unless you use the Canon EX550, the rebel doesn't handle flash well from a TTL point of view.

But, I use my film cameras about 90% of the time. I can't tell if it's because my camera doesn't have the features I need, or if I just don't care much for digital. There are so many things about my current equipment I like that switching just makes no sense to me now.

But, had I purchased a pro digital, who knows?

Jerry

3/31/2004 8:35:45 AM

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Photography Question 
Jeff 

member since: 1/2/2004
  32 .  Coolpix 5700 (E5700) Digital Camera
Does the "Coolpix 5700 (E5700) Digital Camera" have the ability to change shutter speeds? What is the manual focus like, anything like a SLR? Would this be a camera that professionals like to use and take landscape photos with?

2/7/2004 12:44:42 AM

David 

member since: 5/12/2003
  Jeff: You don't mention if you own a 5700 or are just considering buying. In either case, I recommend reading the BetterPhoto review of the 5700. Reading that was one of the major factors in my purchase decision. The 5700 has several user set shooting modes including shutter priority, reviewed in the article as well as the owner's manual, but I find the latter pretty hard to use as the index, IMHO, stinks... lol. The 5700 is considered a prosumer camera and I believe most pros would rather have SLR's, although I think you will find the features more than adequate for high quality non-professional landscape work. Good Luck.

2/8/2004 6:46:31 AM

Karen M. Kroll
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 4/24/2003
  I have been using the CoolPix 5700 now for about 8 months and love the camera. I agree with David as it being a prosumer camera and is an excellent camera for high quality work. I purchased the various lenses that are available for this camera which has made a huge difference in the versatility in my work. Word to the new purchaser - they have updated the camera to the 8700 which only appears to have change the megapixels available (8 instead of 5.3) Remember, shoot in RAW mode if you want excellent quality. There are plenty of examples at my website of this camera. And yes, the manual really does stink! Good luck!

2/10/2004 3:33:28 AM

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Photography Question 
Marty Cotter

member since: 3/24/2002
  33 .  First Digital Camera
Any input about Sony's MVC-CD500 Digital Still Camera? I prefer Carl Zeiss lenses for their outstanding clarity... and this camera has one... plus 5.0 megapixel resolution... aside from that, I have no idea which digital camera to buy. Exactly what should I be looking for?

10/17/2003 6:57:28 AM

Ryan Chai

member since: 9/23/2003
  Marty,

Sony uses the Carl Zeiss lens name, they build to a set of specifications given by Carl Zeiss but the lenses are built by Sony. So the process of manufacturing is different. A real Carl Zeiss lens built by themselves are outstanding. In this case I would consider a Nikon 5700. It has wonderful ED glass. The metering on the 5700 is outstanding as well.

10/17/2003 9:31:13 AM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  If you're astute enough to know about Zeiss optics, I doubt if you'll be really happy with this grade of digital. If this camera does not capture in TIF or raw mode, you'll have compromises associated with JPEG only capture to deal with. I have a Sony JPEG only camera. Without going into detail, my next digital will be from a company that makes cameras.
Look for a good buy on a Contax Aria or RTS-series SLR and use Zeiss lenses. If the cost of the camera is too steep, find a late Yashica SLR that takes Contax lenses. The buy a film scanner and learn Photoshop. This will give you high resolution, high color bit digital that will be a match for your excellent optics.
I think Canon's D1S with the full 35mm frame-sized CMOS (capture device) will come down in price, or the CMOS will be available on other Canon SLR's. There is an adapter available from bobshell.com that allows you to use Contax lenses on a Canon EOS. The drawback is the wait for this to happen. If you're willing to live with the multiplier factor that goes with a CMOS smaller than the 35 frame, use Contax lenses on a Canon 10d.

10/17/2003 10:42:51 AM

Angela Garibay
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 11/13/2001
  Thanks folks! I guess I will find out the hard way. I just bought one of these Sony Mavicas :(... so I will keep you all posted as to the quality of the photos.

12/7/2003 9:36:28 PM

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Photography Question 
Leonid Strizhevskiy

member since: 2/19/2003
  34 .  Digital Professional Cameras
I have some experience with Canon G2.
Would like to TRY to go professional. Mostly nature, may be some still life. (Definitely no action pics). What cameras and lenses would deliver appropriate quality? Budget is an issue.
All suggestions will be most approtiated.

10/7/2003 9:12:11 AM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  By professional, I'd suppose we are talking about giving the customer the best possible image for his money. Your customer will probably want printable images, not JPEG's for the web. Most publishers seem to want 300 ppi resolution. That resolution in an 8 x 12 image is about 6 megapixels.
Your camera should capture in raw or TIF mode, as did, I think, your G2. Your optics should be prime lenses (singe focal lengths, like a 50mm or a 35-mm), or, at least, the best zooms your camera company, Tamron or Tokina make.
Frankly, all these things will be very expensive. Consider shooting with a film camera and one or two prime lenses. I like the 50mm for some landscapes. I also like the 35 or the 28. Your negatives or slides can always be digitized with a scanner later. Many publishers still accept slides or negatives.

10/8/2003 5:16:56 AM

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Photography Question 
Ann 

member since: 9/29/2003
  35 .  Digital Camera for Newspaper Archiving
Our local history and railroad museum has a collection of old and crumbling newspapers which we want to photograph and put on CD. We can't afford pros to do this and so plan to turn every page ourselves and photograph them. What kind of digital camera should we buy? We thought we could erect a camera stand at the correct distance to shot a whole newspaper page at a time. What camera can do this and allow the photo to be readable in every corner of the page? Is there such a thing as a shutter extension for digital cameras? Lots more questions, but you get the idea. The person who will actually shell out the money for the camera is leaning to the Canon G5. That kind of price range. Any further advice on this project would be GREATLY appreciated.

9/29/2003 10:35:41 AM

Andy 
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/28/2002
  The Canon G5 comes with the wireless controler so you do not need any shutter extension. Here are some points that you may consider:

1) Zoom the lens to at least 50mm or 70mm to eliminate extortion on the sides
2) Make sure the newspaper lies absolutely flat
3) Make sure the newspaper is evenly lit on all sides
4) Use the maximum resolution setting
5) Mark the spot of the first page and put the subsequent pages on the same spot so you don't have to move the camera or refocus (after focusing on the first page, then turn the auto focus off; also you can get the esposure data from the first page and lock in the data in manual mode)

Hope this helps.

9/29/2003 1:18:24 PM

Andy 
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/28/2002
  The Canon G5 comes with the wireless controler so you do not need any shutter extension. Here are some points that you may consider:

1) Zoom the lens to at least 50mm or 70mm to eliminate extortion on the sides
2) Make sure the newspaper lies absolutely flat
3) Make sure the newspaper is evenly lit on all sides
4) Use the maximum resolution setting
5) Mark the spot of the first page and put the subsequent pages on the same spot so you don't have to move the camera or refocus (after focusing on the first page, then turn the auto focus off; also you can get the esposure data from the first page and lock in the data in manual mode)

Hope this helps.

9/29/2003 1:19:07 PM

Ann 

member since: 9/29/2003
  Thanks Andy for replying so quickly! Is the wireless controller like a remote control? I was wondering if such a thing existed. Seems like if we zoom the lens to 50mm or more the camera will have to be up on a ladder to get the whole page! But we can do that.

Thanks again.

9/29/2003 8:19:49 PM

Andy 
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/28/2002
  The wireless controller is like a remote control.

Have you thought of hanging the newspaper on the wall (like the paintings) and use a tripod for your camera? Just a thought.

9/30/2003 9:04:50 AM

Elaine 

member since: 8/22/2003
  What about getting a scanner and capturing the newspaper that way? I worked on a project like this but with books (the newspapers we worked with were on microfilm). Feel free to email me if you would like to know more about our process.

Elaine
photoelaine@mail.com

9/30/2003 6:28:01 PM

Damian P. Gadal
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 4/22/2002
  The scanner is the best way to go, and they've become very afforable. This is still be a tedious and time consuming project, but well worth it for future generations.

Another thing I'd like to throw in, I make copies of printed newspaper articles I want to share by taking them to a copy shop and using a colour copier and making sure to copy onto Acid Free paper - this extends the life of the copy, which should last longer than the original...

9/30/2003 7:03:16 PM

Ann 

member since: 9/29/2003
  I'm afraid a scanner the size of a newspaper page is WAY out of our price range. And these papers are so fragile that putting them on to a scanner might crumble them anyway.

What is it that makes large scanners so expensive?

We're only looking for a digital image, although our patrons may want to print out individual articles. That will be relatively easy in Photoshop.

Thanks again for the suggestions. You folks are great!

Ann

9/30/2003 8:53:36 PM

John Leonard

member since: 12/27/2003
  Ann,

My company may have a solution to your problem. We have recently developed a system to do exactly what you require.

We have just finished trials and require english content for a sample to our archiving solution. I would be willing to help with a very low-cost solution, if you would be willing to help us by allowing us to use the images once done as samples of what our solution can do.

Our solution is accomplished with a scanner bed, and digital imageing at in excess of 20 megapixel(over 4 times the resolution of the Canon C5). We would supply the system to you for less than the current cost of the C5, in exchange for use of the images once taken.

If you would like further information on our solution, please post here.

John Leonard CMO
OriginFramework

12/27/2003 5:35:20 AM

Ann 

member since: 9/29/2003
  That is a very tempting solution, John. We have already bought the Canon G5 and are in the process of doing trials right now with a tripod setup. I'm not totally thrilled with the results, which are readable, but could be better and need a lot of time-comsuming manipulation in Photoshop.

Yes, I'd like to hear more about your solution.

Ann

12/27/2003 10:59:27 AM

John Leonard

member since: 12/27/2003
  Ann,

So that I can discuss our solution in a more personal manner, please email me at sales@originframework.co.uk.

12/27/2003 11:09:58 AM

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Photography Question 
Carol Ann Newman

member since: 6/8/2003
  36 .  HP Photosmart 850
I'm considering purchasing the HP Photosmart 850 Digital Camera. Would this camera be worth purchasing for wedding photography?

Thank you very much your help.

6/10/2003 8:04:10 AM

Maynard  McKillen

member since: 3/5/2003
  Dear Carol:
Many digital cameras that do not allow you to physically remove and replace the lens behave in a similar, perhaps undesirable way. Where you push down the shutter button to take the photo, there is a noticeable delay before the shutter actually activates. You may want to find out if the HP 850, which seems to have reflex viewing (You see the subject through the same lens system that takes the photo, instead of looking through a separate, adjacent viewfinder.), suffers from this same problem of delayed shutter release. The consequence of delayed shutter release is that you press the shutter button at the moment of peak action or peak expression, but that moment has already passed by the time the shutter opens.
Often wedding photographers like to supplement ambient light with flash. The HP 850's built-in flash may work fine for small groups, but may not be strong enough to work well for large ones. Then, too, wedding photographers frequently work with several flash units at once. "Slave units", flashes that fire by connecting a sensor to them that detects the bright burst from the camera flash, will not work with the built-in flash on the camera. I've tried. The slave flashes will fire, but not soon enough after the camera flash, and not before the camera's shutter closes. Hence the burst of light from the slave flash will not influence the image. Even rigging a slave triggered by a radio-frequency transmitter/receiver system will suffer this similar fault.
The HP 850 may work quite well as the "second" camera you use for those candid photos that lend depth to the range of emotions you capture on the wedding day, but may not work as well when used as the primary image capture device. A digital SLR, not prone to delayed shutter release, and capable of triggering slave units in a timely manner, may be the better "first" camera.

6/23/2003 5:22:18 PM

Maynard  McKillen

member since: 3/5/2003
  And another thing! The HP 850 is powered by 4 "AA" batteries, and it can drain them fast! You'd plan to keep several sets of rechargeable NiMH "AA" batteries handy for a long day of wedding photos.

6/23/2003 7:01:48 PM

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Photography Question 
Steve 

member since: 12/2/2002
  37 .  Recommendations for Camera/Printer combo for Store
I'm in the process of opening an ice cream parlor, and one of the themes I'm trying to play up in the store is for it to be a community gathering place.

To enforce this, I'd like to purchase a digital camera and a photo printer, and use them to allow me to (with their permission) take photos of my customers (e.g, eating an ice cream), and immediately print them out for the customer to post on our "community wall".

Any recommendations that anyone can offer on a camera/printer combo that would be appropriate for this use?

If possible, I'd like to avoid anything that requires a PC host, so direct camera to printer solutions are the best.

Some of my questions:
- How fast can I turnaround a digital image into a printed photo? Fast enough to make this idea viable?
- How much can I expect to pay per print?
- Will the prints last similar to a normal photo, or will I experience more fading if they are displayed openly?
- Ruggedness/ease of use of the solution? (I may end up having the general counter help run the camera, so something that's easy to operate, and rugged enough to take some abuse would be preferable.)

Thanks!

12/2/2002 3:58:54 PM

Michael Kaplan

member since: 5/27/2003
  I will try to give you some help.

-Any recommendations?
-If possible, I'd like to avoid anything that requires a PC host, so direct camera to printer solutions are the best.

For this I would suggest maybe using aa Direct Photo Printer like the Canon CP-100. It works with a lot of Canon Powershot cameras and you plug the camera right in to the printer. The quality is good and it is fairly simple to use. The supplies are easy to work with as well. There are other 'Photo Printers' which include card readers or direct connections like a model or 2 from HP bit I think the dedicated printer setup from Canon would be most headache free.
Here is the link to see the brochure.
http://www.canon.ca/pdf/cp100_bro.pdf

-Some of my questions:
- How fast can I turnaround a digital image into a printed photo? Fast enough to make this idea viable?

Yes, Printing witht the Cp100 is rated at 81 seconds and it is not too complicated but I doubt you would want to do EVERY SINGLE customer during your rush hour.

- How much can I expect to pay per print?
As far as costs go, this is from imaging-resource.com 's review of the printer. "Print cost of about $0.55 per 4x6 print, based on August 2002 "street" media prices." You can print more than one picture on a 4x6. You can print borderless credit card sized prints as well which only take 40 seconds to print. You can read the article here:
http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRINT/CP100/CP100A.HTM

or from here:
http://www.steves-digicams.com/2002_reviews/cp100.html

Do a search on the net for more info should you need it.
- Will the prints last similar to a normal photo, or will I experience more fading if they are displayed openly?
You will always experience more fading if they are displayed openly. Any quoted life for prints are bases on under glass not in any direct light within certain normal temperatures. But how long do you really need them to last? They say that "The prints from the CP-100 are at least as durable as photographic prints from film"

- Ruggedness/ease of use of the solution? (I may end up having the general counter help run the camera, so something that's easy to operate, and rugged enough to take some abuse would be preferable.)
I would not think this would be a problem as long as they don't go around dropping the camera but you can also buy a fairly inexpensive one which will do just fine for your purposes so if one does break it won't break the bank to get a replacement.

I hope this helped you somewhat and I wish you good luck with your ice cream store and in doing something a little unconventional with the pictures.

Michael Kaplan
Montreal, Canada
Canon EOS-10D
http://www.pbase.com/mkaplan

7/19/2003 3:02:01 PM

Lizbeth M. Gray

member since: 11/8/2003
  Well you will want to match your printer with your camera, and there are several options. First let me say you can no go wrong with Epson quality, however they do have drawbacks. Epsons NEED head cleaning cycles done if not in use, and NEVER use anything but Epson ink and if you do normal printing always use inkjet paper.


That out of the way, I have 4 Epsons, one of them a Photo Stylus 785EPX. My prints look better than the Laser prints in the copy center I work at, and better then the Dye Sub prints that I sell (a 400.00 Olympus included). The new R300 (and most of the new Epson Photos too) has a direct print ability from ANYTHING connecting via usb as well as 12 major card formats support on the slots available. It takes about 1-2 Min to get a borderless 4x6 at the highest quality, personally I use high, it saves ink and time and still look awesome. When I buy ink and paper at my work my prints run about .43 a print at 4x6. The R300 should be about the same, maybe as high as .50. Like ALL dye based printers if displayed the photos will eventually fade, the only way around this is to go with a Dye Sub Printer (apx .60 a print) or Pigment based Inkjet. If you want to go pigment based there are a few options, you could get a Niagara (continuous ink flow, initial cost 300) system that uses pigment ink for any Epson photo printer, or you could go Stylus 2200 (600ish), but the 2200 is a wide format printer and probably more than you need.

For the camera I would suggest finding what you like, and that you are comfortable with. Like I do mainly point and shoot type photography so I have an Olympus C700UZ, which I love and get wonderful looking prints off of. A serious photographer my want to look at things more like the Canon G5 or Olympus C5050 and such cameras.

If you still need the information I hope this helps.

Liz

11/25/2003 5:49:51 PM

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Photography Question 
Kathy 

member since: 11/30/2002
  38 .  Fuji Finepix S602 - Opinions Please
It's time. I want to replace my 23-year-old, absolutely manual, terribly long-in-the-tooth SLR. Decided that I may as well join the early 21st Century and go digital - for many of the same reasons already posted on this site.

I don't want a point-n-shoot. I don't want to spend the equivalent of my monthly mortgage payment.

I've read good things about the Fuji Finepix S602 on other websites - Amazon being one. Nothing here but a short comment posted by Raphael on 23 OCT 02.

I'll probably wait until mid-January or February to buy anything, hoping that prices will drop like rocks after the Holidays.

Thanks in advance for any and all opinions. You folks really are a great source of info; I've enjoyed and learned from all of the posts.

11/30/2002 4:05:59 PM

Darin 

member since: 12/4/2002
  If you want to stay under $750, I'd say Nikon Coolpix 4500, Canon PowerShot G2 or G3, and of course the Fuji FinePix S602. If possible check the local camera shops near you and go try them out to see which you like. Make sure their design is comfortable and intuitive for you. Also don't forget the added cost for a larger memory card, carrying case, and possibly extra batteries or a charger.

12/4/2002 5:08:08 PM

Steve Holtan

member since: 5/2/2002
  The best resource I have found is Imaging Resesource at: http://www.imaging-resource.com/DIGCAM01.HTM.
There are extensive reviews on dozens of digital cameras, sample pictures taken under controled conditions, and a forum to view users experiences. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.

12/5/2002 8:29:36 AM

Ken 

member since: 7/29/2002
  I just upgraded from an Olympus C700 and so far I am very pleased. Camera settings are much easier to access than with the C700. More buttons and less menus. Two macro ranges are great for closeups and magnifier image on manual focus is a real plus.

12/5/2002 10:08:46 AM

Riben 

member since: 9/4/2000
  This website www.dpreview.com gives one of the most comprehensive reviews on digital cameras. Anyway, I own a Fujifilm Finepix 6900 - the earlier generation of Finepix S602. All I can say is I never regretted my purchase. The colors are simply fantastic. Friends thought I took slides.

12/26/2002 3:11:25 AM

Joe G. Lewis

member since: 12/29/2002
  I tried the Olympus c5050z and the Canon G3. Both had significant auto-focus problems. The s602z does a much better job w/ autofocus. I'm very satisfied with the photo-quality images of the s602z.

12/29/2002 8:20:07 PM

Michael Kaplan

member since: 5/27/2003
  I had a S602 before I went and spent the big NIG bucks on the Canon 10D. If you do get this camera you will not be sorry. It is an excellent values. The best for the dollar for sure. I would not bother waiting for Jan/Feb though. It was a much more expensive camera and is surely about to be replaced. I would thing that by next year you won't find any except used. The newer one will certainly have some newer features but will also be up at the higher price again. The difference in price would be negligible anyway since the bigger price drops have already happened on this model.

Think of all the picture opportunities you will be missing between now and then. If you are ready, just go ahead and jump in and enjoy whatever you decide to buy.
Michael Kaplan
Montreal, Canada
Canon EOS-10D
http://www.pbase.com/mkaplan

7/18/2003 7:15:45 AM

Stephen L. Lowther

member since: 8/17/2003
  I have had the S602 Zoom for about a year now and I still absolutly love it. It was my 2nd digital camera and has all the features you need to go from manuel to automatic and produce excellent images, or it can still be used as a point and shoot! Great buy!!

8/17/2003 11:07:35 AM

Kathy 

member since: 11/30/2002
  UPDATE From Kathy

In February, I suprised the heck out of myself when I lowballed a bid for a new S602 on EBay and won.
So far, I must agree with everyone who has given the camera positive reviews. Straight out of the box, it was easy and intuitive to use. (Unfortunately, I botched a great photo of my 4-year-old niece by not checking the preset megapixels. Oh, well...)
As someone who went from the photographic equivalent of a '65 Chevy to a '02 Volvo, I'm delighted.

Thanks to everyone who responded to my inital query. Your comments were a great help.

8/31/2003 6:47:12 PM

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Photography Question 
Daniel 

member since: 11/24/2002
  39 .  The best
Hello, I've seriously been hunting for a digicam for a about a month now and am more confused than ever.

Im considering a few options in the 700.00 to 1,200.00 range (USD). I need the camera to take pics that will be used in my freelance graphic design and jewelry business. I need to create high-quality images that can be manipulated in PhotoShop and sold as fine art digital pieces as well as being placed on a webpage for sale. Of course, I need good macro capability for the jewelry. In addition, I plan on shooting other items such as fine art piece (i.e. paintings, illustrations, etc.). I might also be printing some of the pictures at a decent size (i.e. 8x10 up to 11x14 or 12x18 possibly).

I like the idea of the Cool Light Ring Flash that Nikon makes for shooting jewelry (the 4500 has a perfect one for this which also fits the 5000 with an adapter). There are also one or two more of these flashes on the market that will fit the Sony F717 and Nikon 5700. My problem is that I LOVE the features and quality of the Sony F707/717. Most reviews seem to point to the Sony F717. The more I read about the 5700 (which I've been talking myself into getting) the more I see its problems.

My choices are (unless you have a recommendation, whic would be happily welcomed): Nikon CoolPix 4500 or 5700, Sony F717, or Canon G3.

11/27/2002 8:36:35 AM

Michael F. Harrington

member since: 10/27/2002
  Daniel, you picked a few winners, there, but for Pro photography I wouldn't use any of those. If there were no such thing as Pro D-SLR's, then I would have to say, go with the Nikon since they have superb macro capabilities. The 4500 I didn't like for one reason, (two actually), it's way too small and my Nikon flashes won't mount on it. I would have to say go with the 5700 (it has a hot shoe), but I prefer the D100... and get a good macro lens.

If you are just starting out to shoot pro, you could use the CP4500, but I would make the move up ASAP. There's just no beating the SLR's for versatility.

11/28/2002 11:44:15 AM

Darin 

member since: 12/4/2002
  The G3 has some nice accessories to help you with your needs as well. You might want to look into it. The nice thing about spending the money on the Canon lights is that later on you could use them on a Canon dSLR when they become more affordable or you have the funds to purchase one. They will also work on the Canon EOS line of film SLR's.

Canon PowerShot G3 $800
Conversion Lens Adapter LA-DC58B $25
Close-up Lens 250D 58mm $100
Macrolite Adapter 58C $15
Macro Ring Lite MR-14EX $500
Macro Twin Lite MT-24EX $700
Speedlite 220EX $150
Speedlite 420EX $250
Speedlite 550EX $450

12/4/2002 4:42:33 PM

Robert Lee

member since: 12/2/2002
  Take a look at the Olympus E-10 and E-20 (I've an E-10.) The E-10 should be about $900USD now. This is a true SLR, but with non-interchangeable optics. The lens is (35mm equivalent) 35mm to 140mm, f2.0-f2.8 zoom, macro capable. Olympus will sell you screw on accessory lenses if you really need other focal lengths.

This camera is a tremendous value: if you don't already have an investment in Nikon or Canon lenses. To give you an idea, a Canon f2.8, 28-70mm lens is about $900 by itself.

12/11/2002 5:00:55 PM

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Photography Question 
Doreen 

member since: 10/31/2002
  40 .  zooms on digital cameras
I noticed there were two types of zooms offered on digital cameras. I've heard that the optical zoom is the more important. I was wondering if you had an idea of what a 2x zoom or 3x zoom was compared to a traditional zoom lens for an SLR?
Thanks

11/22/2002 11:35:19 PM

Jeff S. Kennedy

member since: 3/4/2002
  The two kinds of zooms on digicams are:

1. Optical - which is the same as you have with a zoom lens on an SLR. It's in the lens.

2. Digital - which is kind of smoke and mirrors. It is not so much a zoom as a digital enhancement. It is almost certainly accompanied by a loss in image quality.

11/23/2002 12:04:08 PM

Michael F. Harrington

member since: 10/27/2002
  Doreen, Zoom power on some digital cameras use 35mm SLR "equivalent" numbers. For example: The Nikon Coolpix 5700 has an 8X zoom this means that from its widest setting, it can zoom (optically)to magnify the image eight times over. So, it zooms from an equivalent of 35mm to 280mm(8x35=280). Or in true terms 8.9 to 72mm(8x8.9=71.2)

Like Jeff said, digital zoom is just a trick not worth a hoot in my opinion.

11/23/2002 4:23:51 PM

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