BetterPhoto.com - Become a better photographer today!
EMAIL:
PASSWORD:
remember me:     
     


Photography QnA: Animals, Pets, & Wildlife Photography

Browse by Category | All New Questions | All New Responses | Q&A Home

Category: All About Photography : Photographing Specific Subjects : Animals, Pets, & Wildlife Photography

Learn tricks for pet photography and how to shoot wildlife photography in this section. You can also check out this Wildlife Photography article for additional tips and tricks. Want to learn more about how to shoot wildlife photography? Take Jim Zuckerman's How to Photograph Animals & Wildlife online photography course.

Page 2 : 11 -20 of 24 questions

<< Previous 10 skip to page
1 | 2 | ...3
Next 4  >>
     
 
Photography Question 
Frank Brow

member since: 10/15/2004
  11 .  Photographing Animals: Catchlights in Eyes
When shooting animals, I try to avoid "dead eye" with no catchlights. Some photos, however, look great without them. Are catchlights essential? What about a terrific photo with good eye detail but no catchlights? Is it permissible to "Photoshop" a catchlight in post-processing?

4/21/2005 2:47:50 PM

Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member
cammphoto.com

member since: 7/17/2003
  Dark eyes will look better with a catchlight than without. As long as the eye of the animal is in perfect focus, a catchlight is more of a bonus than an essential element.
When shooting in a controlled environment - a studio setup with pet portraits - try to avoid multiple catchlights if you are using several lights or strobes. These are almost always distracting to the viewer. (If Fido will sit still long enough, you can position the lights to avoid this.)
As far as using software to add a little sparkle later, that choice is yours. If it's a pet portrait, the client probably won't know (or care) as long as the photo looks good.
If the shot is to be judged in a competition - where technical merit is part of the judging criteria - you should disclose any post-productions.

4/21/2005 4:03:51 PM

Scott Pedersen

member since: 11/18/2001
  Heres somthing that just bugs me. I have seen some phtographs where the photographer has manipulated some kind of eyeball thingy on the animal in a photo program. Its hard to explain but its round and I guess supposed to represent the "catch lights" Please don't take that route, It looks just goofy. Sparkling or not the eye should look natural. You want to focus on the eye in fact when you shoot.

4/27/2005 4:21:31 AM

John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/27/2001
  I'm with Scott on trying to add it later . . . much better to get it right "in camera." It's a lot less work in the long run and nearly impossible to make it look natural by adding it later as it usually defies the rest of the lighting on the animal (hence Scott's "goofy" observation).

One particular problem with cats is severe "red eye" and with dogs it's severe "yellow eye." Their pupils open up extremely wide. Found I needed to keep the lighting more separated from camera point of view than with humans and working in a space with fairly high ambient (to close pupils down) works better than lower lighting. Does require some work with the ambient so that it's lighting direction is enhanced by strobe (versus working against it and having to try to overwhelm it).

Catchlights don't have to be obvious, they can be subtle . . . particularly in photographs that are more profile. Keep working with the lighting and you'll find what works . . . and what doesn't . . . with experience.

-- John Lind

5/5/2005 9:31:36 PM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
Ann E. Tate

member since: 4/3/2005
  12 .  Animal Pictures: How to Photograph in Low Light
 
How can I get sharp images of lions at dusk without flash reflection from eyes? I changed ISO to 400, too grainy. I shot with a Canon Eos 10D, 100 - 400mm zoom, image stabilized, and monopod.

4/3/2005 8:10:45 AM

  Ann: This is one of those situations where there is no solution, other than a high ISO setting. Or using flash, and then correcting the eyes in Photoshop. That's easy for red-eye in Elements 3.0 and Photoshop CS, but green eye is more common in animals. Perhaps someone can offer a Photoshop tip for easily solving that problem.
Peter Burian
www.peterkburian.com

4/3/2005 8:36:59 AM

Ann E. Tate

member since: 4/3/2005
 
 
 
Peter,
Thanks for your response. It's difficult to know how animals will respond to flash in the wild, depending on circumstances. Most all of my lion sightings were at dusk - wonderful to experience, difficult to capture. I did correct one image in Photoshop 7.0, but eyes look dead now. Most of my images with eyes you can see reflections in the cornea - way cool.

4/3/2005 11:02:52 AM

Ann E. Tate

member since: 4/3/2005
 
 
  Lioness at Dusk, Botswana
Lioness at Dusk, Botswana
 
  Male lion awaits his Brothers, Chitabe Camp
Male lion awaits his Brothers, Chitabe Camp
 
 
Peter,

thanks for your response. Difficult to know how animals will respond to flash in the wild, depending on circumstances. Most all of my lion sitings were at dusk, wonderful to experience, difficult to capture. I did correct one image in Photoshop 7.0, but eyes look dead now. Most of my images with eyes you can see reflections in the cornea - way cool.

4/3/2005 11:03:50 AM

Noor H.

member since: 2/17/2005
  Hey ann,
nice pictures in ur gallery, did you use flash for all of them?
N

4/5/2005 5:07:40 AM

Christopher A. Vedros
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/14/2005
  Gee, my most recent animal shot was a parrot at the zoo. I gotta get out more. ;-)

Nice images Ann. Be careful out there!

4/5/2005 7:54:13 AM

Kerry L. Walker

member since: 12/21/2004
  Green-eye in animals, like red-eye in humans, is caused by the flash being too close to the lens axis. Use a flash bracket and this problem should be eliminated. I'm with Chris. Beautiful shots but I need to get out more too.

4/5/2005 8:08:04 AM

David Petry

member since: 2/2/2005
  Ann,

There is a simple method for red-eye or green-eye in Photoshop Elements 2.0.
1. Zoom in.
2. Select the lasso tool and draw around the the colored area of the pupil.
3. Select Feather from the Select menu and use the default radius of 5 pixels.
4. Open the Hue/Saturation tool from the EnhanceAdjust Color menu. In the Edit drop-down, select yellow or green, and then set both hue and saturation to -180. You may have to repeat this last step or try a different base color.

This nicely leaves the highlight in the pupil and avoids that dead look.

David

4/5/2005 10:22:53 PM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
Betty A. Wisse
BetterPhoto Member
bettywisse.com

member since: 3/6/2004
  13 .  Photographing Wildlife: Lens Question
I am going to shoot wildlife at Triple D and in South Africa . I need to get a 300 or 400 lens for my Nikon D70. I have the 70-200mm VR. which is fabulous but just doesn't get me close enough. I heard the 400 isn't very sharp when pushed all the way out. Anyone have either lens that can advise me on the best one to get?

4/3/2005 8:07:16 AM

  Elizabeth: The Nikon 80-400mm VR zoom is great, but not inexpensive or lightweight. Like any zoom, its optical quality is not the highest at the longest focal lengths but a lot of pros use it. See the review at:
http://www.bythom.com/80400VRlens.htm

"The bad news is twofold: at above 300mm, the lens can be a touch soft (though not as soft as some suggest - with proper technique, it's a very serviceable 400mm lens, just not exceptionally sharp)."

For a review of the Sigma 80-400mm lens, also with image stabilizer, see:
http://www.popphoto.com/article.asp?section_id=2&article_id=1006
Cheers! Peter Burian
www.peterkburian.com

4/3/2005 8:41:12 AM

Dominic Philippa

member since: 10/13/2000
  Elizabeth,
I have been to Kenya twice and Tanzania once and did alot of wild life photography, at the end of the day sometimes the whole up close and personal with a beast of some sort or another doesn't always look fantastic, you will need to spend alot of time in the one place just waiting for the perfect shot to come along,not moving just sitting and waiting, remember you are in the wild, and animals are not knowen to be the photogenic types! all I could suggest is try something different, infra red with emotive cloulds in backround and a field of grass with a rhino mid ground was a silver award winner for me, also a line up of elephants on a hill top with a single tree and a dark storm gathering in colour was a great photo, you may only get a few great great shots but realease the stress and enjoy the scenery, the people and landscape could be more rewarding if time is the essence, infa red is tricky, but worth the trouble if done right.My infra red photo was on a 50mm and the colour was on 300mm sorry if I cant expand any more on the correct lens of your trip just wanted to give a alternative view. galleries by catagory, and on the last page of safari photos lions, etc, are my two that I spoke of. Cheers and safe travels

4/6/2005 4:20:28 AM

Michael H. Cothran

member since: 10/21/2004
  If I'm not mistaken, Nikon makes a high quality 200-400 zoom. It may be out of your price range, but if not, it's worth looking into.
Of course, using lenses in super long focal lengths requires that you use an appropriate quality/size tripod, and practice the best of shooting habits. Otherwise you've wasted your time. And after a day of lugging this equipment around, you should be able to sleep very soundly under the stars.
Michael H. Cothran
www.mhcphoto.net

4/6/2005 5:12:13 AM

Betty A. Wisse
BetterPhoto Member
bettywisse.com

member since: 3/6/2004
  Thank you all for your comments. A very good friend of mine is lending me his 80-400 lens to use till the end of the summer.
Dominic, you are right, I have to remember to see the bigger picture. I've seen some awesome scenery photographs of Africa.
Betty

4/6/2005 7:37:38 AM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
Kathy J. Cooper

member since: 1/8/2004
  14 .  Photographing Farm Birds
I have a friend who cares for ornamental birds: pheasants, chickens, etc. He would like me to take some pictures of them. I'd appreciate any and all tips, as I've never tried anything like this before. I'm assuming that they are in pens and that I'll be outside the pen (hope so, anyway!!). I used to know how to make the cage wire "disappear" but not sure anymore how that was done. It was an f-stop setting I'm sure - but larger or smaller? Any ideas? Thank you.

3/9/2005 3:27:11 PM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  The things that will make the fencing less apparent are:
Getting closer to the fencing. Using a wider aperture. Using a longer focal length.

3/10/2005 6:31:12 AM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  I'm seeing how this Google advertising thing works. At this moment, above the question, there's an ad for "McMurray Hatchery", "Game Bird Farm and Hatchery", "Raising Chickens", and "The Hidden Lives of Chickens".

3/10/2005 9:20:18 AM

Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member
cammphoto.com

member since: 7/17/2003
  On small enclosures, getting the front fence to disappear is easier than the one behind the birds. Since you are being asked to take the photos, your friend probably won't mind you hanging some kind of material over the fence in the background. Follow Jon C's advice to throw the front one out of focus. If done properly, it should look like a slight overall softening ... barely discernible.

3/11/2005 2:24:53 AM

Robert Hambley
rlhambleyphotography.com

member since: 2/2/2004
  Greetings,
I might be overstating an obvious solution. Since the owner is asking you to photograph his birds, you might be able have them removed from the cages altogether and photograph them in a "staging" area. This might give you more options for shooting ... i.e., angles, lighting etc.
Ask him if he knows when the birds are more subdued - like mornings or evenings? Before or after meals? Then set up a place to photograph them away from the cage, when they are naturally inclined to just "sit" there.
Don't worry about the birds being loose with you; they will probably be much more afraid of you than you would be of them. But if they attack: Don't be afraid to use the tripod. (I knew there was a use for one.)
Good Luck,
Robert

3/11/2005 9:57:48 AM

Sharon L. Weeks
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/4/2002
 
 
 
I spent a day at a farm shooting chickens and the best shots I got were while laying quietly on the ground ( in chicken doo) and letting the birds strut back and forth checking me out.
Am attaching a copy of one of the best - I think this ole gal had training! :)
You can see by the look on the goats that they were wondering!

3/15/2005 12:02:17 PM

Sharon L. Weeks
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/4/2002
 
 
 
SEE ATTACHED

3/15/2005 12:11:13 PM

Scott Pedersen

member since: 11/18/2001
  Here, take a tip from a farmer. Just set up inside the pen if you can. Phesant pens do have a top on them however. At least the ones my friends had did. Depending on how wild they are it might be possible to take one out and shoot up in the yard but lock up the dog! Also wear an old pair of jeans and bring along a different pair to put on when you are done. You will be working on your knees and well you know what birds leave in the grass. Geese can take after you so watch em! and have fun.

3/16/2005 4:36:10 AM

Scott Pedersen

member since: 11/18/2001
  Say Kathy let me rephrase my post. Phesants have a top on the pen because they will fly away. You wont be able to take them out. The pens usually are four feet high on the sides and have mesh top that goes up higher in the middle. Sort of like a mesh tent. You will have to get on your knees inside (wear old jeans!) You should be able to hang a blanket or some kind of background in one spot on the inside of the pen. As the pens are built in a shaded area and you have that top additional lighting might be necessary. you could of course take the individual birds out and put them in a suitable confinement to photograph also. It will have to have a top. Never try to use a like a fishing line or similar to try and hobble them or restrict their movements. Chickens and turkeys are only capable of flight between the ground and roost. You could probobly take one up to a garden or nicer background to photograph. But dont expect them to cooperate and let them catch you. As a rule people have been raising phesants for the purpose of releasing them. (repopulation) I wouldnt encourage you to feed them bread scraps as that will make them dependat on humans. In fact its quite possible that there are half wild ones in the trees around the farmstead or even out in a pasture for you to photgraph. ask where this person releases them and go for a hike. Be advised that you can just about step on one before they will get up out in the brush. You will be startled. Sounds like you are going to have a fun photo shoot to me.

3/16/2005 6:37:06 AM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
Bill Walkowiak

member since: 11/27/2004
  15 .  How to Shoot Those Big Nose Dog Faces
I'd like to take photos of my own dogs with the look of all those calendars, etc., out there. They have a huge nose. When the dog gets real close, it is kind of fuzzy. Is it done with a wide-angle lens? What type of digital camera/lens would work well? If you Google "Artlist International USA", you can see what I mean. Thanks!

11/27/2004 5:05:40 AM

  Bill,
Those are definitely wide-angle lenses. You can get that effect if you use at least a 24mm or wider. I did some of my dog with a 17mm.

11/28/2004 5:18:03 PM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
Brandy Perry

member since: 11/4/2002
  16 .  Taking Dog Photos Without Eye Glare
I'm taking Christmas pictures of my puppies. But I can't keep from getting eye reflection. How can I avoid getting the reflection from there eyes?

11/23/2004 12:30:56 PM

Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member
cammphoto.com

member since: 7/17/2003
  If you're referring to catch-lights in their eyes, these can be a good thing. They help to add sparkle and life to your portraits (even with pets).
If you mean that you are getting flash reflections (red-eye), use a p/c cord, and hold the flash off to the side a little ... if you are using an external flash unit.

If your flash is the pop-up, built-in type, use whatever red-eye reduction features your camera has.

11/23/2004 4:08:58 PM

Joanna Meyers

member since: 8/18/2003
  I think you might be talking about that scary "glow" a dog's eyes get if the flash is on. I've had success with bouncing the flash off the ceiling. . .or above the dog's head, anything but directly at the dog's eyes. You can also turn the flash off, but then you need good natural light.

11/30/2004 2:41:30 PM

Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/4/2004
  Great Answer, this can also be lessened by the body angle you have the animal in.
Debby Tabb ( A Photographer's Guide To Pet Portraits, CD)

2/15/2005 9:36:56 AM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
JEEVAN 

member since: 10/11/2004
  17 .  Best Speed Film for Shooting Wildlife?
What is the best ASA or ISO film for shooting wildlife in cloudy lowlight atmosphere and in dense forests?

10/29/2004 9:24:43 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  As low as you can shoot with the light level, lens, and how much motion you can deal with. If you can get a picture with 400, that's the best. But if it's so dark that 400 gets you a too slow of a shutter speed and everything's blurry, bring along some 800.
You can make 800 your cut-off, because 1600 isn't going to be all that great for any wildlife.

10/29/2004 10:14:10 PM

Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member
cammphoto.com

member since: 7/17/2003
 
 
  Doe Eyes
Doe Eyes
Nikkor 180 mm ED, 1/15 second, Provia 100 (pushed to 200)
 
 
It can also be related to timing ... and the quarry you are seeking. I've used 100 ASA (pushed to 200) on wildlife around dawn, but I had to wait until they were almost motionless before taking the shot. Typical shutter speeds will range from 1/15 to 1/60 - not ideal, but workable with a tripod (and cooperative subjects). See enclosed example.
Generally, though, I would agree that 400 or 800 ASA would be more practical to shoot wildlife in low light ... especially when shooting hand-held.

10/30/2004 3:19:12 PM

Tom Kwan

member since: 9/2/2004
  It depends on what kind of wildlife you are shooting. I used 1/1000 sec (aperture priority) to shoot fighting cranes in the air with ISO 800 in a hazy morning. Only with such high speed their action and the falling feathers in the mid air can be frozen. But when shooting birds in the forest, ISO 400 is enough.

10/31/2004 6:42:29 AM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
Alan Lord

member since: 10/22/2003
  18 .  Lesson #1: A Wildlife Guide
The following five places are locations that Iíve been to and highly recommend. Each has its own features and advantages. Yesterday I had surgery to my head and am instructed to keep a low profile for the next little while, so Iím having to look to previous places for a bit.

Yellowstone Bear World, Rexford, Idaho.
www.yellowstonebearworld.com/
We were taking a tour of the Northwest last year and had just gone through Yellowstone National Park seeing only one immature grizzly bear in the process. I recall in the 1930s having visited the park with my folks and seeing many, many bears so this was quite a let-down. We had checked out Bear World and planned a stop there. The bear portion of the park was disappointing since many of the bears were off dozing probably or hiding so we didnít see too many. We then took a tour of the bear portion where we were up on the back of a pickup truck high enough so that the bears couldnít join us. We arranged to take along several flats of goodies for the bears and the guide called them out. We were literally throwing out goodies with one hand and taking pictures with the other. It was well worth the tour. There were many other good sightings of animals there as well. My granddaughters enjoyed seeing a very young fawn.

Cat Tails Rescue Facility, north of Spokane, Washington.
http://www.wtv-zone.com/BigCats/AZoo/CatTails.html
Learning from the guide at Bear World of the existence of this big cat rescue facility, we arranged to stop and take it in. They had periodic tours where the guides told stories of the cats and how they came to be there. Some were amazing about the folks who thought that they could raise a big cat from a cute cub and then they get big and are too much to care for. One story was about a dog in one of the cages. It seemed that a lion had a dog for a friend so when the lion came to the facility, the companion dog came also.

Everglades Holiday Park, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
www.evergladesholidaypark.com/
This is a park that I frequently visit when in Florida as it has interesting birds and isnít that far from civilization. They have airboat tours, which are both interesting and exciting. It is the only place where Iíve had a taste of alligator tail. The guides know where the gators are. They also have some of the most beautiful birds, the Purple Gallinules.

Lion Country Safari, west of West Palm Beach, Florida
www.lioncountrysafari.com/
This is a very popular park but worth a trip through it. In addition to the lions (where you have to keep your windows up), you will drive through animal places that are amazing. You will see ostriches, zebras, wildebeast, rhinos, giraffes, monkeys, gorillas, and so much more. We also caught sight of a piliated woodpecker and pretty wood ducks (both there of their own will).

Puffins at Machias Seal Island
www.machiassealisland.com/
This is our most recent adventure and happened just last month. We went out on a boat from Jonesport, Maine, and transferred to a smaller boat for landing. As the Arctic terns were nesting and little ones hatching, we were cautioned to watch where we stepped or you could step on an egg or hatchling. While walking, we were advised to hold sticks above our heads since the Arctic terns would dive bomb you away from their nests and the stick above would discourage them. We were shown to one of several blinds from which we were able to photograph Atlantic puffins and Razorbill Auks at very close range.
Al Lord

7/11/2004 5:52:57 PM

Rebecka Franklin

member since: 2/9/2004
  Just a quick little note about Bear World. It is about 10 miles outside of Rexburg, Idaho, Not Rexford. Rexburg is home to BYU Idaho. I have not been in Bear World, but I drove past it quite a lot when my grandparents lived out that way. Not only do they have bears, but deer also. On occation you see Buffalo or Elk there.
If you are on your way to Yellowstone through Jackson Hole, there is a side rode that may be worth the while. There is a junction the will take you in a loop back to the highway and it drives trough a Buffalo Sanctuary. Look for the Gross Venture (pronounced Grovaunt)Junction. Oh and don't try to get close, they are wild and unpridictable!

7/13/2004 10:07:51 AM

Alan Lord

member since: 10/22/2003
  Thanks Rebecka. Yes, Bear World is outside of Rexburg, ID since that is where we stayed the previous night. Also, we had seen several herds of buffalo in the Black Hills area that satisfied our buffalo desires. Since we, on this trip, were all from Maryland, seeing large herds of buffalo were unusual to us. Much more than I remember 50-60 years ago.

7/13/2004 11:34:42 AM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
KATHLEEN REEVES

member since: 6/18/2004
  19 .  Lens for Wildlife Photography
I am an amateur photographer that enjoys taking pictures of wildlife. However, I am realizing that I may need a longer lens. I currently have a Minolta Maxxum 9 with a 75-300mm and a 50-500mm lens. What would be the next size lens to upgrade to without me having to switch camera brands? HELP. Thank you.

6/27/2004 4:32:21 PM

Steve McCroskey

member since: 3/20/2004
  Hi Kathleen! I use a Minolta Maxxum 5 with a 28-105mm and a 70-300mm lens. I also use a 2x teleconverter, which you may find beneficial! Another idea is to try to find a fixed focal length lens. For example, a 600 or 800mm lens. I, myself, am trying to find either of these lenses. You might want to consider used equipment!

6/27/2004 6:48:49 PM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  The most economical solution is to simply enlarge and crop the images you currently get with the 50-500. A 2x teleconverter used on either the 70-300 or 50-500 zoom would be a relatively cheap option, but would compromise image sharpness (perhaps as much or more than with enlarging); plus, using the TC restricts you to very small maximum apertures (f/8-11 on the 70-300, f/8-12.7 with the 50-500), which can limit you to longer shutter speeds or faster/high grain film. You could try a cheapie super telephoto, like the Phoenix 650-1300 f/8-16 or Vivitar 600-1000 f/9.9-16 (both are manual focus and aperture, and use T-mount adaptor), but it's a case of "you get what you pay for" with the same sharpness and small aperture issues as a TC on your current lenses. At about $300 it may be worthwhile for occasional use or for the novelty, but don't expect National Geographic quality close-ups.

Next up would be Sigma's 600mm f/8 Reflex. It is a mirror lens with manual focus, and the aperture is fixed at f/8. There are also some good but inexpensive Russian-made 1000mm f/10 mirror lenses (see link, but there can be some issues with fit and clearance between the lens and the prism/built-in flash). Mirror lenses can be quite sharp, but render out-of-focus highlights in doughnut shapes.

Then you have a huge price jump to something professionals use, such as Minolta's 600 f/4 or f/4G lens (about $8000), which could be combined with good results with Minolta's 1.4x APO (840mm f/5.6) or 2x APO (1200mm f/8) teleconverter. Sigma also makes a good 800 f/5.6 EX for about $6000.

6/28/2004 7:50:39 AM

Michael McCullough

member since: 6/11/2002
  You really don't need a longer lens,you have the lenses,you want to get closer to your subjects,try camouflage buy some material and make a pancho know the habits of what wildlife your shooting study them set up along their trails,places where they drink or rest,like I've said you have the lenses,now enjoy the hunt!!!!!!

6/29/2004 7:52:17 AM

Michael McCullough

member since: 6/11/2002
  You really don't need a longer lens,you have the lenses,you want to get closer to your subjects,try camouflage buy some material and make a pancho know the habits of what wildlife your shooting study them set up along their trails,places where they drink or rest,like I've said you have the lenses,now enjoy the hunt!!!!!!This is much like work that produces exilerating results the chase is also exciting its what makes photography what it is, a challenge at times with sometimes rewarding results!!!!

6/29/2004 7:54:44 AM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
 
Photography Question 
Carrie 

member since: 5/19/2004
  20 .  Shooting Photos of Moving Horses
I was just needing some information on taking pictures of horses while they are moving. I've been taking people pictures for years now, but not animals, which is quite different. I went to practice taking some pics of horses while they were walking slowly, and all those pictures came out blurry, and I'm not sure why. I had my camera set on the action mode and I don't really have too much time to practice, so does anyone have any advice for me ... please?? Thanks so much.

5/19/2004 1:00:47 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  Everything blurry or just the feet and head? If the light and your film just won't combine for a fast enough shutter speed, then action mode doesn't do any more for you.
Practice panning with a moving object, so that you will get better at getting a picture of something at various shutter speeds. Next time, just use a faster shutter speed than what you used before - by aperture or by using a faster film.
You can practice panning by taking pictures of cars going down the street at different shutter speeds: 125th, 1/60th, even some as low as 1/15th.

5/19/2004 4:52:11 PM

Kathryn Jeremiah

member since: 1/19/2004
  Hi. I am an intermediate amateur and wonder if camera shake is a problem. What is your film, and what is your shutter speed and aperture? I love horses myself.

5/20/2004 8:07:00 AM

Carrie 

member since: 5/19/2004
  Thanks for your help. I was using 200 speed film, but I was using the action mode, so I didn't set the aperture or shutter speed.

5/22/2004 10:42:58 AM

Kathryn Jeremiah

member since: 1/19/2004
  Hi Try a faster film, and then if that isn't sufficient work on your aperture and shutter speeds being different out of the action mode.

5/23/2004 9:32:07 PM

Jordan 

member since: 12/5/2003
  Hello. If you're using a long-range zoom lens then I would recommend 400 speed film, opening the aperature all the way (probably f/5.6) and focusing on the eyes of the horse. If you're close enough, and can get away with using a smaller lens, then you could probably do 100 speed film with the shutter open all the way. Hope this helps. Jordan

5/28/2004 1:58:10 PM

Respond | Ask Your Own Question
<< Previous 10 skip to page
1 | 2 | ...3
Next 4  >>

Copyright © 1996-2014 BetterPhoto.com, Inc.ģ All Rights Reserved.