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Photography QnA: Indoor/Low-Light Photography

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Category: All About Photography : Photographing Specific Subjects : Indoor/Low-Light Photography

Want to discuss low light photography candlelight scenes? How about indoor photography exposure settings? Any questions about low-light photography are welcome here.

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Photography Question 
Kim C. Deese

member since: 4/11/2005
  31 .  Large Group Photos: Getting the Lighting Right
I have been asked to do a large group photo inside a gym at night of approximately 110 people. I use a SLR 35mm. Could you please give me some tips to get the best photo, as far as aperture, etc.?.

4/11/2005 8:20:33 AM

Kerry L. Walker

member since: 12/21/2004
  Your biggest problem is going to be light. What kind of flash, or flashes, are you going to use?

4/11/2005 8:53:12 AM

Mark Feldstein
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/17/2005
  So Kim, do these 110 people need to be recognizable in the photo or just appear as a sea of people? As Kerry said, your big problem is light, for a lot of reasons, especially if you intend to shoot this on color film because the lights in a gym aren't usually balanced for daylight and produce color casts, like the lovely fluorescent green, or sodium vapor green, yellow, or cyan. Overhead lighting also produces shadows under the eyes of the subjects who aren't gazing up, so those shadows need to be filled or you're going to have a sea of faceless individuals. (Poetic perhaps, but not very photogenic.)
Unless you've got sufficient lighting directed INTO the group, depth of field is also going to be a problem, so people in the back may not be in focus. You need a lot of light from relatively powerful sources and in broad/ diffusing light modifiers (reflectors, softboxes, etc.) to give you smaller f-stops you need for focus or depth of field. Remember, the smaller the f-stop you can work with - e.g. f-11 through 16 - the better off you'll be no matter how many rows of people you've got. An on-camera flash just won't do it, even with a fast film or ISO.
Multiple lights placed on stands is the right way to do this, using a view camera and a Polaroid back to test your lighting and exposure. Beyond that, you may be outgunned on this one, unless you break the big group down into smaller groups, say 5-10 people. ;>)
Mark

4/11/2005 9:27:43 AM

Christopher A. Vedros
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/14/2005
  For a group that large, you might try getting above the group and taking the picture on a downward angle. The bleachers may be arranged in a way that you could do this, or you might stand on a tall ladder. This way, the people will be looking up, and you won't have as many shadows on their faces. If you reverse it and put the people in the stands with you on the floor, you will get shadows on their faces from the overhead lighting.
The lighting will be the tough part.

4/11/2005 3:51:25 PM

Maria Melnyk

member since: 5/2/2004
  I've done this sort of thing without using flash. I used a color-correcting filter - an FLD - and I set a small aperture (f/11 or f/16), and I had the people hold real still during the long exposure. I used 800-speed portrait film, and it worked.

4/12/2005 9:35:23 PM

Victor J. 

member since: 7/29/2003
  How about a wide angle lens, say 28mm. You still have a lighting problem. How about getting a set a bleacher seating outside, we now are getting nice weather. If you can do this be aware where the sun light is at the time of the day you'll be doing the shots. Directly overhead, shadows in the eyes. Directly in front of them, squinting eyes. Have about 27 people in each row, with principal people in front row. That is too large a group to do with your present equipment indoors. Good luck. Vic

4/19/2005 7:36:26 PM

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Photography Question 
AMY P. TODD

member since: 3/9/2005
  32 .  Low Light Photography ... Without Flash
I am taking pictures at a wedding coming up. I will not be able to use a flash during the ceremony. How can I take good photos without a flash in low lighting? Also, what can I use to help with shadows?

3/9/2005 5:30:39 PM

Andrew Laverghetta
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/13/2004
  Try using a higher ISO - like 800, maybe. If you're using 35mm film, try Kodak Portra 800. If you have some money to spare, try getting a normal (50mm fixed) lens with a large maximum aperture. I have a Canon lens that cost me only around $90 and has a very large aperture of f/1.8. It can get you by in pretty low lighting - even with ISO 100.
Again, I would try using an ISO around 800 if you're using an SLR camera, and use a lens with a large aperture. Oh, I almost forgot. Make sure you use a good, working tripod. A wedding isn't normally considered action, so the people shouldn't be moving a whole lot. Hope this helps!

3/9/2005 6:25:07 PM

  In my experience, photographing low-light candids without being allowed to use flash is a challenge, to say the least. I hope that they have a professional using flash. The best you can hope for is to shoot Tmax 3200 black and white film. Using a tripod in low light with people, unless the figures are mannequins, is a low-percentage situation, as there will almost always be slight movement, resulting in blur. Depending on how low the light is, ISO800 may not be enough.
To be ready, try to get to the location before the event to see what you're up against, light-wise. If that is not possible, consider having two camera bodies, one loaded with ISO800 and the other loaded with ISO3200.

3/10/2005 4:38:32 AM

John L. Webb

member since: 2/20/2004
  Shooting low light Weddings has been a specialty of mine for the past several years. I shoot with Leicas at wide open apertures and using film speeds varying (dependant on the lighting I have) from 400 to 3200. I have shot succesfuly hand held as low as 1/15th.
If you can't avoid movement, go with it. Shooting photojouranlistically as I do the movement can actually add to a shot if you frame it with panning motion.
I prefer the look I get with only natural light but here are times when any photographer will have to use some flash but at the moment of the ceremony should not be, in my opinion, one of them.
The suggestions you have received above are all excellent. If you have the chance, scout the location at the same time of day you will be shooting on and then allow for changes in weather that could affect your natural light. Trust yourself and have fun and look for the moments that make the day!

3/15/2005 10:11:11 AM

Judy 

member since: 10/3/2002
  You said you could not use flash during the ceremony; well, you really shouldn't anyway. Shooting the ceremony in natural light just produces better looking photos (i.e., more ambience). Also, it is less distracting. The main thing to remember is use a tripod and 400 or 800 speed film. I have shot around 250 weddings and have never had a problem using this method. HOWEVER, I will say that I learned my lesson on the first wedding I shot and did not bring a flash OR a tripod. The wedding was supposed to be outdoors on a sunny day; well, surprise, it rained and everything got moved indoors. I was 150 miles away from my tripod and flash at that point and had to do the best I could. The photos were okay and had a certain style to them (the client thought they were very, um, arty), but I definitely knew what was missing and vowed to always be prepared in the future.

That said, after the ceremony you most likely will need flash unless it is an outdoor reception. Good luck!

3/15/2005 9:42:45 PM

Maria Melnyk

member since: 5/2/2004
  Both terrific answers and yes, yes, do buy that f/1.8 lens. I have a Canon 85mm f/1.8 that cost me over $300, but you can get a 50mm for less. Your shutter speed should be at least 1/60 for the 50mm, or 1/90 for the 85mm for hand-holding. I also have a fixed 28-80 f/2.8 lens. Your choice of film speed, of course, depends on the amount of available light. I've used everywhere from 400 to 3200, and one church was so dark that the 3200 just wouldn't do it. You can also have the film pushed if necessary. But keep that camera steady to avoid blur. Be careful whether using total manual or aperture-priority exposure; exposure could vary by a stop or even too if your subject moves so much as a foot. Manually meter several areas of the ceremony site prior to the ceremony. And if there is window light coming through, taking the setting sun into consideration.

3/16/2005 4:39:05 PM

Kerry L. Walker

member since: 12/21/2004
  John, why would you want to use a Leica (I assume M series) to shoot in low light situations when there are so many fine autofocus cameras available now? I can't see what a Leica rangefinder has to offer except:
a. Best lenses money can buy
b. No mirror - nearly vibration free
c. Easy to focus when autofocus is lost
d. Quiet as a mouse wetting on cotton

Oh, I know why you use a Leica. Cause they are cheap! (OK, so I'm jealous.)

3/17/2005 7:26:22 AM

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Photography Question 
Linda Guidroz
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/3/2004
  33 .  How to Shoot a Dance Revue with No Flash
I have a Canon Digital Rebel. I was trying to shoot my grand-daughter's first dance revue last year. I used a tripod and no flash, and most of my pictures came out blurred. I really would like to take this year's pictures the right way. I am new to this. Does anyone have any suggestion that would help me out. I really don't want to disappoint my grandbaby this year. Help!!!

3/4/2005 7:51:00 AM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  The least expensive way to get action stopping shutter speeds is to shoot at higher ISO, 800 or 1600. On the Digital Rebel, these higher speeds can only be used in the P, Tv, Av, and M modes. P is virtually as fully automatic and easy to use as the green box or the icon modes if you are not confident of using the other exposure modes.
A relatively inexpensive option is to use a "faster" (wider aperture) lens. The EF 50 f/1.8 costs less than $100, is very sharp, and at f/2 can give you 4x-8x faster shutter speed than the EF-S 18-55 f/3.5-5.6 kit lens. So, instead of 1/15 sec. and f/5.6 with the zoom, you could get 1/125 f/2 with the 50 f/1.8.

3/4/2005 9:12:00 AM

DANIELA A. JORDAN

member since: 4/25/2001
  My children are competition dancers, and that is where my photography hobby is based. Before I bought my digital Canon 20D, I was using a Canon Rebel with every ISO type known to man. NOTHING made a difference until I bought a 2.8 lense. Suddenly, it seemed I had gotten a degree in photography. Now I am using this same lense on my 20D and the results are just amazing. I don't know much about photography (I barely know what shutter speed is) --- it's all just luck with me. However, I truly believe the answer in the equipment. There is no telling how much money I spent on film developing before I discovered the lens!

3/28/2005 4:05:27 PM

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Photography Question 
Mary Guiher

member since: 2/27/2005
  34 .  Shooting a Circus Indoors
I am shooting slide film for a class this week. I am going to be shooting a circus indoors. Should I use daylight or tungsten film? Also, if I use a flash, how do I set the built-in flash for manual mode for a Nikon N80?
Thanks,
Mary

2/27/2005 6:04:52 PM

John Sandstedt
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/8/2001
  First, you'll need to check whether flash pictures are permitted. (I recently shot some pics at N.Y.'s Big Apple Circus, where flash photography isn't permitted.)
Then, you need to determine how close you'll be sitting to the circus ring(s). This will give you some idea of how effective the spot lights will be relative to you camera. Generally, circuses are very well lit, except for those acts where dimmer lighting is part of the show. I actually used an Olympus Stylus 115, with fixed aperture (probably about f/8) and fixed shutter speed (about 1/40th sec). Got great results.
That being said, I'd use daylight film. There will be many different colored lights. Sure, some will be "incandescent," but daylight film will probably give you more saturated effects with the brighter colors.
On general principles, I'd use ISO 400 film (I like Fujichrome.)

Can't help you with respect to setting your Nikon built-in flash as I use Canon equipment. But, as I said at the outset, there's a very good chance you'll not be able to take flash pictures anyway.

2/28/2005 6:47:23 AM

Dan W. Shallenberger

member since: 10/1/2002
  I agree with John here, but I have one thing to add. You mentioned using your built-in flash... even if flash photography IS allowed there, your built in flash will be no good for anything further than maybe 15 feet away. I doubt that other than some clowns roaming around, you would not get close enough to anything for the built-in flash to be effective. You would need to invest in a more powerful flash to use on the hot shoe, like an SB-28 or SB-80.

Do you have to use slide film? While I love slide film myself, and it would look great, negative film has a larger exposure latitude, and might save you some shots that would otherwise be over/under-exposed. But, then again, slide film is a great learning tool.

Have fun!

3/1/2005 2:17:21 PM

Mary Guiher

member since: 2/27/2005
  Thanks for the information. There is an hour period before the circus starts where people can go into the ring and meet some trainers. This is what I will concentrate my shoot material on since I have no idea how close I am to the actual stage. I did get first pavilion seating, but am not sure how close that is. I do have to shoot slide film for class. The funny this is, my professor had no real suggestions for me. I'm glad I posted my questions. If you can think of anything else I'd love to hear it. Thanks Again,
Mary

3/1/2005 5:09:05 PM

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Photography Question 
Allison Lewis

member since: 2/10/2005
  35 .  Low-Light Settings for Shooting Child
I am trying to take pictures of my 1-year-old with my Nikon D70. I am trying to use window lighting with no flash, but the shutter speed is too slow and she is so quick that all my pictures are blurry. Thanks for any suggestions.

2/10/2005 4:50:50 PM

kathy stephens

member since: 1/10/2005
  Allson,
My first suggestion would be to bump up your ISO to about 800 and possibly set the camera on a monopod. It would move around with her as she moves MUCH better than a tri-pod and can be easily adjusted very low to the floor so that you can sit down. On the D70, you can also move your setting to the low-light setting on the top, which looks like a building with a moonlight shining over it. That setting works nicely too. Try those things and see if that doesn't help.

2/11/2005 2:15:28 AM

Michael H. Cothran

member since: 10/21/2004
  I'd avoid increasing the ISO too much, as all you're doing is adding noise and image degradation. Try moving your child as close to the window as possible, where your light level will obviously be brighter. Then maybe find a bigger window also.
Michael H. Cothran
www.mhcphoto.net

2/11/2005 7:35:27 AM

Andres  Llopart
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/13/2005
 
 
 
I will suggest using a fast lens. I don't know if you are already using one (since you haven't mentioned), but a prime lens with an aperture of f/1.8 ($70) or even better a f/1.4 ($250 it is worth the money) will help you a lot. I use it a lot to take pictures of my sisters new born with a 50mm f/1.4 and using a ISO 200 or 400.

2/15/2005 12:38:48 PM

Andres  Llopart
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/13/2005
 
 
  Eric
Eric
 
 
I will suggest using a fast lens. I don't know if you are already using one (since you haven't mentioned), but a prime lens with an aperture of f/1.8 ($70) or even better a f/1.4 ($250 it is worth the money) will help you a lot. I use it a lot to take pictures of my sisters new born with a 50mm f/1.4 and using a ISO 200 or 400.

2/15/2005 12:39:38 PM

Katie Lorenz

member since: 12/4/2003
  Allison
I often use natural window lighting when shooting wedding portraits and I have found that setting my camera to 1/30 at 5.6 works pretty consistently. Usually my subjects are not moving but I have photographed my very active kitten in front of a window with these settings and had excent results.

2/17/2005 4:08:44 PM

Sreedevi  Kashi

member since: 6/10/2003
  I know you want the natural look of window lighting, but maybe you could use a separate flash unit with a sock or something like that over the bulb and use the flash as a fill flash. The only thing is, it may take a little bit of experimenting for you, unless you have a light meter. You want to have your flash give you an f/stop reading that's the same as the ambient reading of what your scene says your f/stop should be at your chosen shutter speed. I just think this would be easier to do with your child running around. And you'll still get that natural look to your shot.

2/19/2005 7:03:53 AM

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Photography Question 
Tasha N. Graham

member since: 1/28/2005
  36 .  Shooting Light of a Candle?
So I am in a photography class in high school. I want to shoot portraits using only the light of a candle. However, whenever I try this, my pictures come out to dark or with lots of motion! How can I fix this and make a beautiful picture? I am using 100 speed film.

1/28/2005 1:24:54 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  Use a tripod and with no movement at all from the person. And don't expose for the flame, but for the light level away from the flame - which is going to be very low because the light has a steep fall off after only a few inches away from the flame. So increase you shutter speed.

1/28/2005 11:53:50 PM

Kathy J. Cooper

member since: 1/8/2004
  The tripod is a must, of course, but you may also try using a few candles instead of just one. You'll get the same warm lighting, just a bit more of it. If you decide to include the flame of the candle itself in your portraits, experiment with your f-stop to get anything from "glowing" flames to flames with moderate or even large "stars" radiating from them. Experiment. Experiment. Oh ... and never forget to have fun!!!!

1/29/2005 5:27:34 AM

Michael McCullough

member since: 6/11/2002
  Try a faster film I recommend Fuji 800,and a tripod 100 speed is very slow for this type of shooting and you are probably unable to get a high enough speed to prevent blur or movement,good luck!!!!

2/1/2005 12:35:30 PM

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Photography Question 
Abdulmoneim Mahmoud

member since: 1/7/2005
  37 .  Taking Photos from TV
How can I take photos from the TV using a digital camera and a normal camera?

1/7/2005 11:42:22 PM

Doug  Elliott
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/18/2004
  Abdulmoneim,
Shoot in a dark room, and set your camera's shutter speed at 1/30 and set your f/stop according to your camera's meter setting. American television sets refresh their screen every 1/30th of a second.
Hope this idea is helpful.
Doug

1/8/2005 7:48:17 PM

Roy Blinston
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/4/2005
  Photos from TV are always bad quality. I am a graphic designer and capture pics form TV using a digital video grabber (motion), then nudge from frame to frame to get the best shot. I then convert this to PICT format and open it in Photoshop. At this point much work needs to be done with the photo to have any hope of bringing it up to scratch (however it is just about possible). Hope this helps. - Roy

1/10/2005 9:13:40 AM

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Photography Question 
TRACY WILLIAMS
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 12/28/2004
  38 .  Shooting Action in Low Light Indoors
I'm looking for equipment suggestions for my Nikon D70. I'd like to shoot some dog agility at local indoor fairgrounds buildings. Lighting is terrible, and flash not permitted. I've tried w/a 80-200 f2.8, but the pics were still too noisy w/shutter speed set high enough to stop the action. Tried adjusting ISO lots, but still not satisfied. Anyone else doing this?
Thanks, Tracy.

1/7/2005 3:06:56 PM

Doug  Elliott
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/18/2004
  Tracy,
If you can't use flash, can you use hot lights? If you can, why not set up a set of lights that will allow you to add light and allow you to get the shots you like? The club might enjoy having extra lighting. If you can put them up high so they shine down, you can get great shots without any noticeable shadows. I would suggest 500 to 1,000 watt halogen units.
Hope this idea is helpful.
Doug

1/8/2005 7:07:18 PM

Terry L. Woods

member since: 4/2/2004
  Maybe try to look for a higher-end camera store that you could rent a Canon 1D setup with their big glass telephoto 300 or 400 mm lens w/an opening of 2.8. Or see what's available in a Nikon lens to rent vs. putting out a chunk of $ first. ( Sorry I am not that familiar with Nikon equip.), all I know is, for sports Canon is what most pros use to shoot indoors with for lower ISO's and clarity. Terry

1/10/2005 9:48:38 AM

Thomas C. Rowe

member since: 5/1/2004
  I have the same problems shooting indoor horse shows during the winter months. Low light, flash not allowed, fast action. I own a 80-200 2.8 Nikon AF in conjunction with a D70 and it does well outdoors or with a flash. Indoors with a high shutter speed the light is not sufficient even with very high ISO's. I was going to rent a 300mm 2.8 Nikon (around 65 dollars for the weekend) but have not tried it yet. The bigger 2.8 lenses (600, 1000)are "prohibitively" expensive. What do pro photographers use in this situation???????? Also, cannot use hot lights.

1/10/2005 1:32:55 PM

TRACY WILLIAMS
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 12/28/2004
 
 
 
Hi Everyone, I did a practice run this weekend w/ a new lens. 85mm 1.8. While the images were still underexposed I can pull them up a bit in software. I've added one for review that has a edge border added. Seems a little soft to me.

Was wondering if a 1.4 teleconverter on the 80-200 2.8 might make a difference? Thanks for the suggestions. Tracy

1/10/2005 3:49:28 PM

Doug  Elliott
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/18/2004
  Tracy,
Great picture! I like the action and the moment you caught the dog in the air.
I would like to follow up on the suggestion about hot lights. Were you able to get permission to use hot light to help your lighting situation? I use some halogen units that put out a 1,000 watt for photographing the exterior of homes at dusk. I have a pair of work lights from Home Depot. I have removed the safety cages that are on the front of the heads so I donít get any unwanted shadows. A pair of 500 watts halogen lights should cost you about $60.00.
Are you using PhotoShop CS? If you shoot in raw you can gain about one to two full f/stops from your picture.
Good shooting
Doug

1/10/2005 6:08:58 PM

  Hi Tracy, I think the image's main subject is soft, but if you look under it's chest area at the jump itself, you will see that it is quite sharp. I just think that in shooting you could have brought the focus forward. With a lense like this remember you are going to have a narrower DoF, so you have less room for error which is a challenge with moving subjects...

1/11/2005 7:00:19 AM

TRACY WILLIAMS
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 12/28/2004
  Hey Doug, I didn't get a chance to look into the lights for this event but will do so for future. This arena has windows up high and does have big lights in the ceiling but I'm not sure of their wattage. I'm going to do some further investigating on this with the local clubs.
Thanks for all comments and ideas! Some days I'm really "on" the action and some days I don't have my rhythm but its always a challenge!
Tracy

1/11/2005 8:06:06 AM

Charles Cooper

member since: 2/11/2005
  "Was wondering if a 1.4 teleconverter on the 80-200 2.8 might make a difference?"

Yes, it will make a difference, but not "in a good way". The speed of the lens will be 1 f-stop slower, so your nice 80-200 F2.8 becomes an 80-200 F4. This will only make the arena "seem darker", which is not what you are trying to do.

If you don't mind a fixed focal length, adding the teleconverter to the 85mm F1.8 lens would give you a bit of reach (the 80 "becomes" a 128), but you still lose the f-stop, pusing the effective speed of your 1.8 to a 2.8.

Of course, a 128mm F2.8 might do the trick.

A side question - when you quote the lens lengths, are you referring to the numbers on the lens, or the "crop factor numbers" based on the fact that you are using a digital rather than a film SLR?

Good luck.

2/11/2005 8:56:29 PM

JAMK  Photography
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/13/2004
  Tracy,

Have you tried using Neat Image to reduce the noise when using a high ISO? I also have a Nikon D70 with a 70-200mm 2.8 VR lens. I haven't really used it indoors but I have shot it at 800+ ISO with decent results using Neat Image.

Steve

2/13/2005 3:24:02 AM

Dara R. Purves

member since: 10/16/2008
  I am an honest beginner, and I was wondering, how can I set a high shutter speed indoors without underexposing my film? I have a Nikon FM10, fully manual, and I want to be able to photograph my dance rehersals while my friends are dancing. So far, Ive had either a blurry photo or underexposed. I dont know where my "priority" setting is (if there is one). I mainly use 125 ISO, very rarely I use 400. But if you have figured out your situation or if anyone else on here could that would be awesome. By the way your pictures are awesome! My theme is horses and I love the curiosity and depth in the eyes of animals, and you really captured that in your photos!

Thanks, DP

10/16/2008 8:11:00 PM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
"how can I set a high shutter speed indoors without underexposing my film?"

With (much) more light, Dara.
So if there isn't more ambient light available, and flash light is not allowed or possible, you're up the creek without a paddle.
Can't you use flash light on your dancing friends?

10/17/2008 5:44:27 AM

Doug  Elliott
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/18/2004
  Dara,
You can set your ASA manually. You need to buy film that has a high ASA 800 or 1600 would work well. Try to get as much light on the dancers as possible. Shoot them as they pass by a window. Borrow your's dad's shop lights. Then yellow or orange one on a bar and turn them on. They are rated at 500 watts per lamp head. Either aim it direclty at the dancers or if you have a short ceiling aim it at the ceiling. You will need to push your film when it is developed. You will have to find a pro lab that can do that. I hope these ideas are helpful.
Doug

10/17/2008 1:48:04 PM

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Photography Question 
rick delorme

member since: 1/5/2005
  39 .  Indoor 35mm Film
Hi! What film would you suggest for quality indoor pix? Friends are telling me ISO 800. We are going to Graceland soon and want nice pix inside the Mansion. Thanks, Rick.

1/5/2005 7:30:28 AM

Michael H. Cothran

member since: 10/21/2004
  You would need 800 if you are not allowed to use flash, or don't want to use it. 800-speed films have improved, but they're still pretty grainy. 400 speed films have improved a lot more, and I would stick with the 400s, especially if you know you can use a flash.

1/6/2005 7:43:38 AM

  Hello Rick,
I have had great results recently using Kodak 400 High Definition Color Film. It's fast enough to use with natural window lighting and no flash (depending on your settings); and when a flash is introduced there is minimal grain and excellent clarity. The one drawback I have noticed is the film leans towards a bluish green tint. More so outdoors with plants, grass, trees and sky. It has a rich beautiful coloring however sometimes it looks a bit unreal.It would definately be worth a try.

Kodak Max 800 is an extremely versatile film with or without a flash. As long as you don't want to blow your image up to larger than approx. 16x20 its a very safe film to choose. If you want a black and white film and do plan on using a flash you might want to bring along Kodak TMAX 100. Have a great time at Graceland.

1/10/2005 12:02:10 PM

Scott Pedersen

member since: 11/18/2001
  Like above, 800 but you also need an 80A filter on your lens for shooting without flash. Remove it to use your flash.

1/11/2005 5:15:30 AM

Tom 

member since: 11/24/2003
  As a former resident of Memphis whose wife worked at Graceland, let me tell you that flash photography is NOT allowed in the Mansion. If your camera automatically turns on the flash in low light settings, you will need to turn off the flash. The 400 speed films are usually good enough to get the shots you want.

1/15/2005 3:19:47 PM

rick delorme

member since: 1/5/2005
  Would 800 be not right in lighting in Graceland? If 400 is fine enough, ok. Thanks, Rick. I have fuli Superia Xtra 400. What do u think?

1/15/2005 4:06:11 PM

 
 
  Bette Midler Kiss my Brass Tour 2004
Bette Midler Kiss my Brass Tour 2004
Kodak 800 Max film pushed to 1600. 300mm Zoom Lens. No flash.
 
  Bette Midler -Carousal
Bette Midler -Carousal
SACRAMENTO, California

Photograph taken using a 300mm Lens. Settings were 4.5 1/45. Film was pushed from 800 to 1600 to capture the natural lighting with no flash. Special Cartoon artistic effect used with a simple Kodak program. No other effects used.

 
 
Hello again Rick,
Have you used the fugi film before in low light situations? If it was me I would definately go with the kodak max 800. It has very saturated coloring and lots of flexibility regarding exposure. I have never been dissapointed using the 800. Below is an image I took at a concert with 800 film pushed to 1600 and it still wasn't grainy...have fun!

1/15/2005 4:57:32 PM

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Photography Question 
David K

member since: 12/2/2004
  40 .  Digital Photography in Fluorescent Lights
I am trying to shoot a bunch of pamphlets and books in a lighting booth that is fluorescent lighting. The booth is all white. I am using a digital Canon A80. I have set a custom white balance (off a piece of typing paper), shooting on manual on a tripod with an ISO setting of 100. When I import the shots into Photoshop on my Mac, I have noticed the white background often appears gray. When I shoot, I am getting a +0 reading. Is there a way to overcome this gray/white issue (aside from not shooting under fluorescents?). I'm kind of stuck with it and making the best of what I have.
I have compensated by setting a little overexposure, but I was wondering if this is necessary and if I'm not doing something that should be done. Thanks!

12/2/2004 11:11:16 AM

Rhonda L. Tolar

member since: 3/19/2004
  I don't know much about digital, but can you set a custom white balance off of the white background? Shouldn't that work?

12/2/2004 11:36:36 AM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  Setting white balance keeps the photos from taking on a color cast from different light sources - daylight v. tungsten v. fluorescent. That the white subject appears gray is due to the exposure meter being fooled. The meter is set to expose as if the light is being reflected from 18-percent gray, which a typical scene would average. If the scene/subject is largely white, the meter thinks the scene is brighter than it actually is and so tends to underexpose. In these situations (white wedding dress, beach sand or snow, etc.) you correct this by applying between +1 and +2 exposure compensation.
The opposite occurs if your subject is much darker color - eg., black tuxedo, black Labrador retriever, etc. In this case, the meter will tend to overexpose, rendering the subjects gray instead of black. This is corrected the opposite way, by applying negative exposure compensation.

12/2/2004 1:04:44 PM

David K

member since: 12/2/2004
  Thanks both for your responses. Jon, your answer explains why I've had to bump up the exposure compensation so much. Sometimes up to +2/3. Thanks for the technical explanation.

12/2/2004 1:10:36 PM

Rhonda L. Tolar

member since: 3/19/2004
  So, if David had used a gray card to do an exposure reading, the white background would be white?

12/2/2004 1:27:55 PM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  Yes. Set white balance off a white card to prevent whites from taking on blue, yellow, magenta, green ... cast. Meter off a calibrated gray card to keep white (and black) from being rendered gray.

12/3/2004 6:06:40 AM

Rhonda L. Tolar

member since: 3/19/2004
  Thanks, Jon, for clearing that up for me. I am just now getting started out in digital, and let me tell you ... I am very confused!

12/3/2004 6:48:12 AM

David K

member since: 12/2/2004
  Jon, when you say meter off the gray card (sorry, I am new at this too), do you mean take the exposure metering off the card?

12/3/2004 9:05:18 AM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  Yes. Place the gray card in the same light as your subject, and meter it. In centerweighted or evaluative/matrix metering, the card should fill at least 75 percent of the viewfinder, or you can spot/partial meter the card.

12/3/2004 1:47:01 PM

Darrell Jensen

member since: 4/21/2004
  I use a product to set exposure/WB called Expodisc. It does corrects the exp/WB in camera better than I ever did post-process. I have and have used Greycard and Whitecard. ED is much easier, especially for long distance, wide angle shots, but also for product and potrait photography.

12/7/2004 7:17:39 AM

Darrell Jensen

member since: 4/21/2004
  I use a product to set exposure/WB called Expodisc. It does corrects the exp/WB in camera better than I ever did post-process. I have and have used Greycard and Whitecard. ED is much easier, especially for long distance, wide angle shots, but also for product and potrait photography.

12/7/2004 7:17:53 AM

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