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Photography QnA: Comparing Camera Brands

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Category: Best Photographic Equipment to Buy : Film-Based Camera Equipment : 35mm Cameras : Comparing Camera Brands

Your 35mm camera comparison buyers guide! Check out all of the different brands and what people are saying about them.

Page 1 : 1 -8 of 8 questions

   
     
 
Photography Question 
rajesh kumar

member since: 10/3/2004
  1 .  Which Film Camera is Suitable for a Beginner?
I'm a beginner in photography. I would like to buy one film camera. Would you please suggest one? I need better quality - my range is $400 to 450.

1/7/2005 6:00:54 AM

Kerry L. Walker

member since: 12/21/2004
  There is no one camera that is the best. The cameras by all the major manufacturers are good. Canon, Minolta, Pentax and Nikon all offer good cameras in your price range. Pick the one that fits your hands the best and has the features you want. Automation is good but you will need manual controls also.

1/7/2005 7:35:03 AM

Scott Pedersen

member since: 11/18/2001
  Pentax has nice cameras. I have always been satisfied with my ME-Super. Compact and will can be used fully manual if needed. Of course on the modern ones you have auto focus and apature. Lots of great tools on them. Im assuming that you budget is for camera body and lens. Looks like the ist or one of the zx series is what you want. Check out B and H or Ritz camera too for a kit. body and lens. They have diffent ones. Probobly shoot for focal coverage in the 28 to 100 mm range. That should be a good starter for you. You can add later depending on what you want to do. The modern lenses are for the most part quite nice as far as sharpness. They are going to be slower of course than high end lenses. Now remember a high end lens will run you oh 700 bucks and up I would say. everybody starts with the lens that comes on the camera and goes from there.

1/11/2005 5:13:33 AM

Willie 

member since: 12/2/2004
  Hello Rajesh,
Let me know if you are still interested in buying a film camera.
I have one for sale.
If you are interested, email me
at willie@astconline.com

Thanks
Willie

1/12/2005 2:23:12 AM

Jacob P. Eubanks

member since: 1/16/2005
  Personally, I would recommend you find yourself an older manual SLR ( I use a mamiya Sekor 1000 DTL, preferably one with the K Mount (m42) like a pentax k1000 or the 1000 Dtl. These cameras take very clear, beautiful pictures (especially in Black and White) and are easy to learn on. Likewise, the lenses have come way down in price (i have about 10 lenses in my setup and Ive spent less than 150 bucks). These Lenses are also usable on modern day cameras. You could probally pick up a camera and a few lenses for around $100. Whats really nice about this is, if you decide it's not for you, you're really only ouyt 100 bucks, on a camera that holds its market value.

1/16/2005 5:34:20 PM

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Photography Question 
Sue Carter

member since: 12/26/2003
  2 .  Which Camera to Buy?
Help! I was all set to buy the Rebel D and went to a photo store and was told that the new Nikon D70 was much better. I was a bit unsure how much of what the employee told me was true but basically he said it was faster, clearer, had many more options and the photos could be enlarged much larger. I currently use the Rebel 2000 and have several lenses although none that were too expensive. Was this guy just trying to sell me the camera of the day or was he right?

Thanks!

3/6/2004 6:53:16 PM

Wing Wong
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/8/2004
  Hi Sue,

Well, the Nikon D70 will have more resolution and various other improvements which were not present in the Canon Digital Rebel. So the employee wasn't trying to sell you the camera of the day.

The thing is, several new cameras are coming out recently which have better resolution and such.

Since you have Canon lenses, you would be better served getting the Rebel and then selling it and upgrading to the newer Canon digital body. That way, you get to make use of your existing set of lenses.

3/7/2004 12:15:27 AM

Esther Mishkowitz

member since: 5/14/2000
  is there a canon camera out there that is comparable to the d70?
thanks

12/14/2004 7:40:59 PM

Tom N. King

member since: 11/15/2004
  Yes. If you are looking to stay with the canon EOS lineup, there the EOS 20D for about $1500 or the older EOS 10D for about $1100-$1200.
To switch brand now would mean that you might have to start collecting lens to that brand as well, and more money wasted. When it come to buying an SLR, chose the brand that offer a good combination of cameras and lens.
you can't have nikon today and pentax so on the bext day. Well unless money is no object. But than again the time to learn new system. I for one don't like to sit there and read a new system, i'd rather go shooting.
be safe, be happy, go shooting.
tom

12/14/2004 9:21:05 PM

John Sandstedt
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/8/2001
  Pop Phot recently rated the nikon D70 as 2004 Camera of the Year. you should check out the December and January issues - in the section on Gear, Pop Photo notes great things about the Canon 20D and several problems with the D70. It's interesting that the camera of the Year Rating was given based on the comments in Gear.

In the January issue, the 20D is reviewed and really given a lot of praise. Again, I don't get the COTY rating.

Since you're using Canon equipment, Canon is probably the better choice. You won't have to get all new lenses.

Remember something, the Rebel D is the lower level digital SLR offered by Canon.. Thus, it's inappropriate to compare it to either the D70 or 20D.

12/15/2004 8:02:41 AM

  A tough choice between a superb + camera (D70), a superb camera (10D) and a really superb ++ camera (20D).

You cannot go wrong with any of these three, but if you own Canon lenses, it does not make sense to buy a Nikon camera.

If your budget allows, the 8 megapixel EOS 20D(versus the 6 megapixel models) is probably the best camera in the consumer level D SLR market.

Cheers! Peter

12/31/2004 11:25:59 AM

Nacoma D. Hayden
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 12/27/2004
  Stick with the Canon. You already have the equiptment and its a waste of money to get a new system. Evenmore "Canon" is the best name in photography. (No I'm not getting paid to make this statement)

1/9/2005 2:39:01 PM

Derek Holyhead

member since: 12/26/2003
  Hi Sue,
Buy the Nikon and then send all your Canon lenses to me for use on my digital rebel, just joking. I have the Digital Rebel and have no real complaints with it and unless you need more features than your current Rebel 2000 it should be a good choice for you. I previously used a EOS 600 (630 in the USA) and the only thing I miss is the option to choose the AF mode myself and for this I wish I had chosen the 10D, the 20D wasn't available 12 months ago when I bought my Digital Rebel. As Nacoma said, Canon is the best name in photography, I have been using them since 1973. Stick with Canon and keep your lenses, if not refer to the my first line! Good luck.
Regards,
Del

1/9/2005 4:32:56 PM

Andres  Llopart
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/13/2005
  The D70, 10D and Digital Rebel are all great camera bodies. If you are looking for sharper images and better quality you should invest more on lenses rather than the body. Saying that the Digital Rebel comes with a great price that allows you to spend some money in a better lens. Lenses don’t depreciate as much as the cameras bodies, and last much longer. If you have a budget go for the Digital Rebel (bought mine under $700) and get better lens, in the future you can upgrade to better bodies when the prices come down….

1/13/2005 11:55:45 AM

Sue Carter

member since: 12/26/2003
  Hi Guys-

Thanks for all of your input. I asked this question the 6th of March last year and lately it is getting a bunch of activity. In May I bought the Digital Rebel. I love it. My lenses work with it (plus all the new lenses I have bought since). It never gives me any trouble and the pic's are great. If I was buying today I would probably step up to one of the newer canon's and probably will eventually but for now this camera does everything I need it to do.

Sue

1/17/2005 1:33:58 PM

Grant Davenport

member since: 9/12/2004
 

Sue,

Hi there and thanks for my chance to respond to this question.

I don't know how many times these sort of questions have been asked on this website....

I remember a saying someone in a camera shop said to me once "Canon are nice to touch, and nice to hold, but if it were a Nikon consider it sold"...boom boom lol
No but seriously :
It's like asking "how long is a piece of string" or "how tall's a china man" or "do you like sweet & sour chicken or sweet & sour pork"
It comes down to the individual. It's there personal choice as to what camera they pick up, feel, like to hold and ultimately what they buy. The consumer is the only person who can make this choice.

Yes, the D70 is a great camera at a very good price. It has alot of the better features and functions of the more expensive D100 and you do have the ability to use 99% of the older Nikon lenses that you may already own. Nikon have always been of very good quality and hopefully will continue this tradition of reliabilty and decent prices.
As for "is Canon better than Nikon", that again comes down to the individual. I love my Nikon equipment and wouldn't part with it for the world
however if I was to ever have to replace all my equipment for some strange reason, I would definately consider Canon gear as it too is excellent photographic equip' and some of the functions/features on Canon aren't available on Nikon so it's 6 of one and half a dozen of the other.

Best of luck with your choice and remember, forget what camera you use but remember get out there and start shooting.

Grant
anyoccasionphotography

2/3/2005 5:24:11 PM

Grant Davenport

member since: 9/12/2004
 
Sue,

Hi there and thanks for my chance to respond to this question.

I don't know how many times these sort of questions have been asked on this website....

I remember a saying someone in a camera shop said to me once "Canon are nice to touch, and nice to hold, but if it were a Nikon consider it sold"...boom boom lol
No but seriously :
It's like asking "how long is a piece of string" or "how tall's a china man" or "do you like sweet & sour chicken or sweet & sour pork"
It comes down to the individual. It's there personal choice as to what camera they pick up, feel, like to hold and ultimately what they buy. The consumer is the only person who can make this choice.

Yes, the D70 is a great camera at a very good price. It has alot of the better features and functions of the more expensive D100 and you do have the ability to use 99% of the older Nikon lenses that you may already own. Nikon have always been of very good quality and hopefully will continue this tradition of reliabilty and decent prices.
As for "is Canon better than Nikon", that again comes down to the individual. I love my Nikon equipment and wouldn't part with it for the world
however if I was to ever have to replace all my equipment for some strange reason, I would definately consider Canon gear as it too is excellent photographic equip' and some of the functions/features on Canon aren't available on Nikon so it's 6 of one and half a dozen of the other.

Best of luck with your choice and remember, forget what camera you use but remember get out there and start shooting.

Grant
anyoccasionphotography

2/3/2005 5:25:45 PM

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Photography Question 
Amanda J. Hubbard

member since: 1/25/2004
  3 .  Canon or Fuji Digital SLR's
I'm debating whether to purchase the Canon 10D or the Fuji FinePix S2 Pro, 12.1 Megapixel Digital Camera. They are the same price, but different mega pixels. When I researched the Fuji, it said the number of effective pixels is 6.17 though. So would I be better off to get the Canon? (I love Canon cameras very much!) Is the Fuji a good camera?

1/25/2004 10:10:11 AM

Shawn I.O. Yon

member since: 1/25/2004
  My advise is to visit your local camera shop and bring your memory card and test both cameras. If they don't let you take test photos, then consider renting them.

They are both good cameras and you can't go wrong with either one. I was in your situation and chose the 10D because Canon lens are less expensive than Nikon lens. Also, if there are any new camera body designs, I would not be sure if the Nikon lens system would be compatable in the longterm.

Hope this helps.

1/25/2004 4:44:49 PM

Reid S. Mason

member since: 1/6/2004
  Amanda, As a long time Canon user I confess I'm a bit biased BUT when it was time to move to digital I did check out the other stuff out there. What I found was that though there are a lot of really nice Digi SLRs out there, I wouldn't say one in particular is better than another when considering bodies at the same price point. That being the case I picked the 10D for two reasons. One, it works just like my Canon film cameras - pretty much the same controls, layout etc. And two, Canon lenses are especially good. Though the body is very important, it really is the glass that makes it all come together. I'd recommend the 28 - 135 Image Stabelizer as your main lens, I keep it on my camera about 80 percent of the time.

Good luck in making up your mind - I know it's difficult but the end result is you'll have an entirely new way to communicate your art!

1/26/2004 8:01:23 PM

Robert Bridges

member since: 5/12/2003
  Hi Amanda, I thought I would add my two cents worth to your question and this discussion coming from the film only world and moving away from Canon. Like you and many others, I too have done extensive research on various digital cameras e.g, Canon, Fuji, Nikon, Kodak. Were I in your shoes at this point there is no question that I would go with the Fuji. Its built on the Nikon N80 camera and uses Nikon glass. Contrary to some, I have not found Nikon lenses to be more expensive then the Canon but simply more honest then the Canon. Canon markets two classes of lenses - the decent and cheap, and the expensive and great. Nikon markets just the reasonable and the great. Personally I prefer the latter.

I tend to be a purist I suppose in that I would suggest that if you go with the Canon that instead of getting an image stabilizer lens that you buy a good tripod instead. Technology is fine - but hard work will, in the long run produce better images. Now what I would seriously recommend is that you wait till this summer and take a good hard look at the new Nikon digital which has not yet been introduced to the general public but will be coming out to compete price wise with the Canon Rebel Digital. It's not just about the number of mexapixals that determines image quality. Leaving aside the human factor things such as filtering, noise, moire filters, body quality, capture software, etc which are also extremely important. Unless you must have that camera today - I'd wait a few months and see what both Fuji and Nikon have in store.

Hope this was not too critical and I agree with Reid M in his advice to play with both. However I do disagree with the assumption that digital is an entirely new way to communicate your art, it's simply a different way.

1/28/2004 8:43:43 AM

Michael McCullough

member since: 6/11/2002
  I have talked casually with a portrait photographer in regards to his Fuji S2 and he did mention that the colours were at times oversaturated and he was allways reworking his images in photoshop,any ways both appear to be OK cameras,but did you know that Nikon is coming out with a brand new D70 which is supposed to be under a 1000 dollars and looks to be very nice.

1/28/2004 9:46:55 AM

Beth Espinoza

member since: 1/21/2004
  Hi Amanda!
While I LOVE the Canons, especially the EOS 1/10Ds, I found a very good deal on the Fuji Finepix S1 Pro (The 6.17 eff. mPix). While I am something of a novice, I have been EXTREMELY HAPPY with the performance of this camera! (It has the Nikon lense F-mount, for the Nikon/Nikkormat(?) lenses.)
Are you sure that maybe you didn't get the S2 Pro and S1 Pro mixed up while researching? A 6 mPix loss seems unusually large. The way that I learned how much mPix a photographer needs is dependant upon the largest size prints that you anticipate producing, figured at 300 dpi for the LxH of the picture.(This is the "rule of thumb" widely used for print-quality photo resolution, similar to print resolution from non-digital pix.) A 3-ish mPix camera will give you a 300 dpi resolution for a print photo equal to about an 8x10, while a 12 mPix I guess would give you something about 4 times those dimensions. I hope this isn't going over what you already know, but you'd be surprised how many people aren't aware of it. (I'm with you, though, if you can afford it--GO FOR IT!)
Trying the cameras out is EXCELLENT ADVICE! I think that no matter which you choose, you're going to be happy with chioce, as they are both fine cameras.
Best of luck to you!

1/28/2004 12:20:34 PM

Gregg Vieregge

member since: 11/10/2000
  I have been shooting professionally for 3 years with the Fuji S2 and I have been very satisfies. I use Tamron lenses. They work great. I have never shot with a canon so I have no advice there. I have heard the new Rebel is alot of camera for the $$$. I am waiting for the new Fuji S3 to cone out this spring and I'm sure I'll purchase it. The 6.12 effective pixels will keep my files in JPEG for faster editing. I have great success in this range.

2/10/2004 5:41:05 AM

Rafael Funes

member since: 1/3/2004
 
 
  Joy
Joy
Taken with Canon 28-135 IS and processed with C1 LE 1.3
 
 
I am a Canon fan. Lenses are great and well worth the price. Though you can use Sigma lenses too, they are fine and less expensive. When moving to digital, the body is as important as the lens, since the lens produces the image and the body (sensor-processor) records it. I have tried several digital bodies from different manufacturers and I chose the Canon 10D. I agree that IS lenses are great, so great that Nikon is working hard to release a few when Canon has had them available for quite some time. I am convinced that nowadays Canon is clearly superior to Nikon and offers better options beforehand. A great additional tool is Capture One LE 1.3 raw image processing software.

My two cents.

2/10/2004 7:36:34 AM

Michael McCullough

member since: 6/11/2002
  Oh,just something I heard going around that the performance of the Canon Digital Rebels in coldweather conditions leaves alot to be desired,the problem has been with the Rebel lineup begining in there film based cameras!!!

2/10/2004 12:04:40 PM

Gregg Vieregge

member since: 11/10/2000
  YOU MIGHT WANT TO CHECK OUT THE EARLY SPECS. ON THE FUJI S3. THE REVIEWS CLAIM THAT THE NEW SENSORS PRODUCE FILM QAULITY IMAGES.

2/10/2004 12:32:11 PM

Dave Kone

member since: 2/4/2004
  S2 Pro can Canon 10d same price? Fuji S2 pro is $1950 or there abouts and the 10d is $1350

What do you get for the extra $600?

Dave Kone

2/10/2004 6:55:46 PM

Gregg Vieregge

member since: 11/10/2000
  Dave K.

Your wrong. The S2 can be purchased for $1049. Search the net. I would really suggest looking ay the S3!

2/10/2004 7:20:32 PM

Dave Kone

member since: 2/4/2004
  Please send me a link where you can get the Fugi S2 Pro for $1049 new.

I looked on B&H, Adorama, pricegrabber.

Even on Ebay one is about to end in a few hours and its already at $1700. I saw a used body go for $1200 on ebay.

I bought a second 10d used with a 50mm 1.4 lens and 2 256 meg lexar cards for $1250.

So instead of blurting out Your wrong, can you be a little nicer when you reply and put some supporting links in to help us out.

After all we are just photographers trying to help each other out.

Dave Kone

2/11/2004 5:07:32 AM

Rafael Funes

member since: 1/3/2004
  Let's focus. Fuji makes great products, also Nikon and Canon. It's interesting all three are Japanese companies, isn't it? They satisfy their customers and we customers have preferences. As I stated before, I am a Canon fan, but I have a couple of fellow photographers totally engaged with Nikon. Amanda likes Canon and both the 10D and Canon lenses are amongst the finest available.

Rafael.

2/11/2004 11:47:59 AM

Wing Wong
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/8/2004
  Hi Amanda,

Canon and Fuji does their cameras differently. If I had to choose, I would go with the Fuji S2pro for 3 reasons:
- much lower noise levels in pictures
- better auto-focus speed/reliability
- 12MP downsample to 6MP

The S2Pro takes pictures with a 6MP sensor oriented at 45 degrees and gets resampled up to 12MP. From there, it gets downsampled to 6MP as it's stanfard resolution.

The end result is that you have a true resolving power of 6MP with the S2Pro and a much lower noise and artifact issue when shooting at 6MP.

Check out www.dpreview.com for detailed reviews. :)

2/14/2004 9:10:46 PM

amirhoushank farhoudimoghaddam

member since: 1/12/2004
  whats ytopur ida lave?

2/15/2004 11:22:16 PM

Dave Kone

member since: 2/4/2004
  Amanda, Just curious as to what your final decision is?

I know after a while of looking and getting advice you get enough good answers to go either way, and leaves you still confused!

David

2/16/2004 3:57:00 AM

Amanda J. Hubbard

member since: 1/25/2004
  David,
I am leaning towards the Canon, but I have been continuing my research on other cameras as well.

-Amanda

2/17/2004 8:14:54 PM

Dave Kone

member since: 2/4/2004
  Good idea. Keep looking. Dont get caught up in Pixels, there is a lot more to a camera than that! And sometimes a camera with less pixels will produce a better picture due to the size of each pixel sensor.

Dont know if I mentioned it before but www.imaging-resource.com has great reviews on both cameras.

Let us know what you decide! THEN you have to pick a lens! AHHH it never ends.

David

2/18/2004 4:50:38 AM

Gene 

member since: 2/10/2004
  Amanda - have just finished going through the same endless process of making a digital camera choice, went with the 10D.
go to www.dpreview.com, this is one of the best review sites on the web, here you can compare the two camera's, etc. hope this will help you with your decision.
btw, depreview rates the 10D a little above the S2 - Gene

2/18/2004 6:10:33 AM

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Photography Question 
River Side

member since: 9/10/2001
  4 .  Oh No.. Not another Rebel 2000 vs N65 Question!
Hi Guys,

I've narrowed down my search for a beginner SLR 35mm AF camera to the Canon Rebel 2000 and Nikon N65. I just need to clarify a few things.

1. How durable are these cameras. (Has Canon's plastic construction really affected it's durability?).

2. The N65 doesn't have Mirror Lockup. What exactly is it and why would I need it.. If I'd need it at all?

3. The N65 shoots 2.5fps when in Sports Mode ONLY. Is this true? and does that mean I can't take multiple photos in a manual mode? Does the Canon let you take it's 1.5fps pictures in any mode?

4. There is no remote control on the Canon. Is there a Self Timer? Is it good enough? How about the Self Timer on the N65?

5. There is no connection for external flash on Canon. True or False? Can I add one later?

6. How is the battery life on both cameras. Are they both battery guzzlers or economical to own.

7. Is there any difference in PQ when using a 50mm/f1.8 or f1.4 Canon or Nikkor lens respectively.

8. What is a PC connection. Do these Cameras have it?

9. I can stretch my budget a little. So are the N80 and Canon Elan 7 really worth the price difference going a step above?

10. If I never want to upgrade to telephoto or other complex/advanced lenses, which brand Canon, Nikon, Minolta, Pentax is best for me?

Thanks for your patience. I'm as green as they come in Photography.. but I promise, if you have any questions on setting up a HT, I'd be very glad to help you out in return :)

9/10/2001 11:40:42 AM

Elaine S. Robbins
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/14/2000
  I purchased a Rebel 2000 in April and have really enjoyed it - I, too, had been weighing the Canon against the Nikon N65. Ultimately I just preferred the way the Canon felt in my hands as well as the bright viewfinder and layout of the controls. As for your questions:

1. I took my Rebel hiking in the Badlands of North Dakota. I was pretty careful with it, but it still got a few bumps - and it was fine. I don't give a whole lot of credence to those who complain about the plastic because frankly, if you drop/bump it that hard then you're just not being careful enough. Pros who do a lot of field work maybe are justified in having a "really rugged" camera, but for us normal folks, I don't think it really matters.

2. Mirror Lockup is when you can pre-fire the mirror of an SLR before actually firing the shutter. It is useful for long or very low light exposures where the vibration of the mirror could cause blur. I've done 20 second exposures without it (since the Rebel doesn't have it) and the slides are plenty sharp.

3. I have no idea....

4. Actually, you can buy a remote for the Canon, as well as a cable release. It also has a self-timer (10 seconds, though it may be programmable) that would work as well as long as your subject isn't moving much (i.e. not sports or animals, etc).

5. False. It has a hot shoe and can hence be added to.

6. I don't really know. I'm still on my first pair of batteries, since April, have probably shot 100 rolls. However, I don't use the flash much - flash sucks batteries on any camera.

9. I don't know much about either, however, now that I'm seeing Elan 7s online for $300-400, I'm almost wishing that I'd waited a little. On the other hand, the Rebel is extremely light and compact for an SLR, particularly one with so many features - I can carry it around in a midsize purse and no one's the wiser (very convenient while traveling).

10. Both Canon and Nikon have excellent lenses. I don't think it really matters. I'm saving up for a 75-300 IS lens by Canon - either of the cameras you're considering could be used with higher-quality lenses.

Good luck!

Elaine

9/16/2001 3:36:05 PM

Yaron Kidron

member since: 7/29/2001
  1. They are durable enough, for most daily needs. Neither are built as tanks. Both the N80 and Elan 7 feel much better. Plastic is a none-issue really. Top cameras are usually composed of PolyComposites, the same material that NASA builds essential space-crafts. And that also has a plasticy feel.

2. Mirror lockup is mostly needed in Macro photography; if you intend in embarking seriously in this kind of photography, neither models would suite you. However, this is a very specific niche. For nearly all occasions, mirror lockup is not required (When you lock the mirror, you can not frame your picture!)

3. Can't provide any input on that.

4. False. you can buy a remote or a cable release for both bodies. (there are several models available). There is also a timer.

5. You can add any EOS flash system to the Rebel 2000. Take note though, that flash performance is considered to be better optimized with Nikons. The higher priced Canons (as well as the Elan 7) match the Nikons though in this term.

6. Irrelevant; you would spend much more on film than on batteries. In any case, you can buy battery packs for both bodies- these could easily prolong battery-depended camera life.

7. The f/1.4s are marginally better in picture quality. However,they are constructed to meet pro-usage, and the EOS version employs USM (as well as full time manual focusing). Is it worth the extra money? if you are planning to study photography, the 50mm lens is the best way to start. However, Most people will NOT see the difference in PQ.

8. Neither do, and if you're not planning to shoot in a studio, then forget all about it.

9. I believe they actually do worth the extra cash. BUT- a better camera would not necessarily translate to better photography, at least for starters. If you don't need extra-ruggedness, faster AF, fast film advance and more manual control, then buy the lower priced bodies, and invest in a tripod, a remote release, and loads of film. THIS would make you a better photographer.

10. Nikon has the most elaborate lens line. It also provides you with the option of buying lower-priced, manual focus Nikkor lenses, and hooking them up to the N65 (You need to check for compatibility, though- some lenses would not meter correctly). The EOS line has loads of lenses as well, some of which are world-class leaders, especially with stabilized telephotos, and standard-tele zooms. Minolta and Pentax travel behind. It does not matter what they have to offer, just remember- the more you spend on a lens, the better lens you're going to have; and in most cases, your lens collection is going to far outweigh your camera body in terms of price.

9/17/2001 12:43:42 PM

Doug 

member since: 5/27/2003
 
 
 
The N65 is slightly better by a very slim margin. The Canon has some interesting features, but overall the Nikon feels and handles just a tad better. This does not mean, however, that this comparison holds true on up the line of these manufacturers' products.

I myself am trying to decide between the Elan 7 or N80. I'm quite intrigued with Nikon, but I want to eventually go digital and think Canon may be a cheaper solution. Any ideas? (Apologies if this is a retread as I'm new to the forum).

5/27/2003 3:25:25 PM

Doug 

member since: 5/27/2003
  The N65 is slightly better by a very slim margin. The Canon has some interesting features, but overall the Nikon feels and handles just a tad better. This does not mean, however, that this comparison holds true on up the line of these manufacturers' products.

I myself am trying to decide between the Elan 7 or N80. I'm quite intrigued with Nikon, but I want to eventually go digital and think Canon may be a cheaper solution. Any ideas? (Apologies if this is a retread as I'm new to the forum).

5/27/2003 3:25:57 PM

Judith A. Clark

member since: 9/14/2002
  8. There is an adaptor that you can buy making your hotshoe into a PC. You only use this if you are going to fire some none dedicated flash units, and studio lights. I know on my old Canon, I had a few camera stores tell me it would not work, but it did as long as I used manual. I have a Nikon D100 now and use the same adapter to fire my lights also in manual. If you are useing studio lights, you need to have a light meter to meter the scene anyway, so manual is not a problem.

5/28/2003 3:52:12 AM

River Side

member since: 9/10/2001
  Well well well.. it's been a while I visited this thread.. I think just for fun, after two years and still using the Rebel 2K and opting not to shell more for the Elan 7, I should respond to my own questions.

1. The camera is still going strong.. personally I have discovered the people who complain about 'plastic' are used to older bodies.. as the new 'plastic' is quite resilient against proper use.

2. I never felt the need for a Mirror Lockup so far.. the Elan 7 has it, plus the lit focusing points, but i'm opting against upgrading the body .. I may invest more on the lens instead.

3. Again... haven't used the continuous shooting mode for the Rebel 2K so I guess it wasn't relevant.

4. There is a self timer.. I use it quite often.. haven't found the need for a remote control yet.

5. ok.. that was a silly question .. the hot shoe takes compatible flashes.. in fact i'm using a Vivitar 285HV instead of the expensive TTL Canon options.

6. Batteries drain faster if I use the on camera flash.. but i've just bought a bunch of AA NiMH batteries and a Maha charger and plan to get the Canon BP-200 battery pack which allows the use of AA batteries.

7. sorry again.. that was a lens question thrown in between a body questions.. but hey.. I was a newbie back then.. I got the 50mm 1.8 (1.4 too rich for my blood) PQ is great as long as I stay at 5.6 or above.. goes a little softer at the edges at 4 and softer still wider than that.

8. I can't recall why I asked this.. maybe I read their specs..anyway dunno and dun really care now.

9. I think the main problem with the Rebel 2K is the dull viewfinder, unlit LCD and focusing points and a little hard to find in the dark controls.

The Elan 7, or the new Rebel Ti for that matter have focusing points that light up and metal lens mounts, BUT i'm sticking with my Rebel 2K because of the great AF system and the metering which to date has been great for such an affordable body.

I have learnt the hard way that better lenses not better bodies make a better picture.

10. Still have no need for specialty lenses.. IMO Canon has the edge now with it's AF system and the USM IS lenses.. Nikon has the USM equivalent but very few if any IS kinda lenses.

I think I did good going with the Canon Rebel 2K. Gonna replace the dog 28-105mm USM with the less-of-a-dog consumer 28-135mm IS as my all time traveller lens and concentrate more on technique and pray to win the lottery to get into the L lenses.

Thanks everybody for the responses.. i'm not so green as I was two years ago.. but there is a long way to go.. To anyone else faced with the predicament; unless you have inherited a sack of Nikkors, Go Rebel 2K .. u can get it for like $150 these days .. and if u want more, get the Rebel Ti (lit focusing points great advantage) .. they blow the entry Nikons out of the water till it gets to N80 and then u have Elan 7 to take care of it.

5/30/2003 12:57:51 PM

Melissa Williams

member since: 3/29/2003
  I love my Rebel 2000 and I work in a camera store so I've gotten to play with the Nikons. I think it's now discontinued, Wolf/Ritz/Kits Cameras only has ten left in their warehouse.
I have the remote switch, it's called the RS-60E3. It is not wireless, but it allows for bulb exposures, and helps with camera shake on slow exposures, since you're not touching the camera to release the shutter. I don't think there is a wireless version. If I'm wrong, tell me where I can get one. I use a 28-200 Tamron lens for almost everything. I hardly ever use my other three lenses unless it's for some specific reason like filter size. I didn't like the feel of the Rebel Ti, but that's just me. I don't feel the need for a lit LCD personally, I just look in the viewfinder to see the f stop and shutter speed. I like that it has a lot of focus points but I think it might bug me if they lit up. You just have to weigh the pros and cons of each and decide which one suits you best. There's no such thing as "The best camera." Find the one that's best for YOU. Then create your images with what you have: your eye, and your knowledge of shutter and f-stop.

6/23/2003 10:59:22 PM

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Photography Question 
Dani M

member since: 9/2/2001
  5 .  Which is Better - Nikon N80 or Canon Rebel 2000?
Which is better Nikon N80 or Canon Rebel 2000? Do either of these come with the date stamp?

9/6/2001 2:20:04 AM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  The N80 is a much better and much more expensive camera than the Rebel 2000. The N65 and the Rebel 2000 are equivalent. The N80 and the Elan 7/7e are roughly equivalent. All 4 models are available in a QD (Quartz Date) version.

[Editor: here is a link to the Nikon N80 QD date version although I never recommend using the date function, myself. I find it distracting. - Jim]

9/6/2001 3:49:44 PM

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Photography Question 
Christine Howe

member since: 9/3/2001
  6 .  Purchasing My First SLR Camera
I am about to ditch my failing point and shoot camera for an SLR camera. After some research and questioning I have been told that the Canon Rebel 2000 is the ideal beginner's camera. I asked a camera shop salesperson if she could compare it to any others. She suggested the Pentax mz7 as it has a more durable construction (I am a self-confessed clutz).

Any thoughts on this with respect to which might be better for someone new to SLR?

9/3/2001 3:09:29 PM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  I've used only Canon for 30 years, and, ya know what? I'm rather upset with them. You can't buy an all-manual Canon any more. If you want to buy new, I'd recommend the current Nikon manual exposure, manual focus SLR. Do some reading, take a class in photography basics, and hang out on this site. Shoot lots of film, and learn from it.
If you give in to automation, you won't learn photography the right way. It would be like learning a few guitar chords, without knowing the piano keyboard, never learning scales, or knowing how music is put together.

9/4/2001 9:40:16 AM

Jeff S. Kennedy

member since: 3/4/2002
  Doug's response is a bit misleading. It is true Canon doesn't make a manual focus camera and their cameras all have various auto and program modes. But many of them also have manual modes (which is what I shoot in 90% of the time). Plus you can set them to manual focus when needed (about 60% of the time). I would look for a camera that does allow manual operation but not necessarily an all manual camera.

9/4/2001 10:55:32 AM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  I was assuming everyone has as little self-control as I do. When I have a shortcut or a cop-out handy, I'm too apt to use it.

9/4/2001 12:55:21 PM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  Whoops. My last remark could easily be misunderstood. It is NOT a cop-out to use automatic exposure or autofocus. A pro, for example, HAS to get the action shot, and can't afford the time to fiddle. But the pro knows what the automatic feature is doing, and knows when he needs it and when he doesn't. I'm glad I made the mistakes I did (and still do) with only manual settings. I don't photograph for a living, because I'm afraid it would take the fun out of it.

9/4/2001 2:10:10 PM

Christine Howe

member since: 9/3/2001
  Thanks for the thoughts. You seem to have quite a passionate dislike for the crutch of automation...LOL :)
However, as this is my first SLR and I doubt I am ready to go all manual just yet (thanks for the vote of confidence though) - which is why these two camera's were recommended for me. I'm a bit snap-happy and am hoping to get a bit creative. I do plan to take a course or two but I'm not making any plans to leave my profession for a living behind the lens just yet.

Any thoughts on the Pentax MZ7? I have been sort of leaning more towards it. Seems to have a bit more flexibility, and as I mentioned before, better construction (metal vs plastic). Has anyone done any comparison shopping between the two (or any other similar models?).


9/4/2001 10:29:35 PM

Jeff S. Kennedy

member since: 3/4/2002
  I don't know much about the current crop of SLR's but I can tell you what to look for in a camera system. I say system because it's not just a camera you're buying. A camera is basically just a light tight box that you put a lens on. There really isn't a lot of difference between any of them other than which bells and whistles they have and how they work. Nikon and Canon make the most complete systems (most variety of lenses and accessories) but Pentax and Minolta are pretty close. I would just make sure that whatever you get has a manual mode on it because eventually as you learn what you are doing you are going to want more control over what the camera is doing.

9/5/2001 12:03:04 AM

Ken B

member since: 4/29/2001
  I can't comment on the Pentax, but I have had a Rebel 2000 for 6 months now. It really is a great piece of equipment. It is fully automatic and fully manual and many thing in between. There are times that I want to experiment and learn more and there are times that I just want or need to get the shot. It gives me the best of both worlds. As far as the plastic body and ruggedness goes, I can say that it hasn't seemed to be a problem as of yet. It is lighter than most and the fact is that good quality plastic products are far better today than they were 20 years ago.

9/15/2001 1:31:10 AM

Karen Stanford

member since: 3/5/2002
  I went out to have a hands on look at the Canon EOS 2000 knowing that was the camera I wanted. Apparently at all 3 camera stores I dtopped at the Canon Rep never comes in so the salespeople were pushing Canon. All 3 had their favorites but all 3 did say the Minolta Maxximum 5 was the one to buy. But I got a good buy on the Canon on Ebay and I am looking forward to having a "real" autofocus. I currently have a Canon T50 and after seeing photos on this website I know that the Canon EOS 2000 is really going to help me. Go for the Canon 2000!

3/7/2002 2:39:04 PM

Peter D. Hyde

member since: 5/19/2002
  Hi Christine,
I have used a Pentax Spotmatic ll since 1970. It is a totally manual camera and has been a pleasure to use and learn with. However I just ran 2 rolls of 200iso through my brand new Pentax Mz7 and all I can say is WOW. Yes buy it. You can use it manually. You will not be missing good shots while you fumble and try to remember new techniques. This camera will let you become fully competent and as skillfull as you want to be.
I thought the 3.5/5.6 aperture zoom would be a bit limiting but not so.
This is one incredible camera and should serve you many many years.
Also the light weight is a real bonus.
Shop around for a good price. You should be in around $275.
Go for it!!!!
P.S. As a beginner welcome to SLR's and check out "The complete photographer" by Andreas Feininger. ISBN 0-13-162255-2
Good luck
Pete

5/19/2002 5:01:18 PM

Christine Howe

member since: 9/3/2001
  Thanks all for the advice on the Camera purchase. I bought the Rebel 2000 last fall and am really enjoying it. I am 110% sure I am not using it to its maximum potential but have been impressed with what I have been able to pick up on my own so far. I think its perfect for the true amateur like myself who literally had no clue what to do with it when I first took it of the box. The automatic settings are great for those social occasions where I go "snap-happy" and really just want a quality POS. I have also been getting creative with the manual settings and the new zoom lens I received for my birthday.
I have been checking out some photog. courses. Does anyone live in the Toronto area who can recommend a course? I have been leaning towards George Brown but mainly because I have not found much else.

thanks again
Christine

5/20/2002 10:13:22 PM

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Photography Question 
Susan Snedeker

member since: 8/19/2001
  7 .  Beginner's 35mm SLR Camera - What to Buy
I want purchase a 35mm SLR camera and I am a beginner. What would you reccommed? I would like to start off with a camera that offers various lens choices, i.e. wide angle, etc. The camera does not have to be new. I would prefer to purchase used. What should I look for when buying used?

8/19/2001 1:30:05 PM

Matt Marsh

member since: 1/27/2001
  Susan,

Probably the most recommended beginners camera by instructors is the Pentax K-1000. It is a totally manual camera body with match needle manual metering. There is a huge availability of all kinds of lenses. Because this camera uses any standard K-mount Pentax lens, it is capable of the same quality photos as any top of the line 35mm SLR, and is revered by beginners and pros alike. If you truly want to learn photography, stick to a manual camera body or at least one that has totally manual capability. Check out E-Bay, there is always several used K-1000 bodies and packages for sale there.

8/19/2001 6:29:12 PM

Susan Snedeker

member since: 8/19/2001
  Thanks for getting back with me Matt. If you do not mind, I would like to ask you a couple other questions. Can you please check out this Pentax K-1000 at eBay and tell me what you think of that camera? 2nd, can you tell me what you think of the Canon Elan 7 for beginners?

Thank you for your time. :)

Susan

8/19/2001 11:29:09 PM

John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/27/2001
  The K-1000 is a workhorse. A pro friend of mine uses the system. Pentax also made other K-mount bodies: K-1000SE, K2, KM, KX, ME, and MX. Some of these have variants compatible with motor drives made for the system.

Other workhorse systems along the same lines Matt mentioned:

Nikon FM-2 and FE-2 bodies with Nikkor AIS lenses. The FM-2 is mechanical with manual exposure. The FE-2 is electronic with aperture priority auto exposure.

Olympus OM-1n and OM-2n with Zuiko OM mount lenses. The OM-1n is similar to the FM-2 and the OM-2n is simlar to the FE-2.

Basic lenses and other common accessories for all these systems are relatively plentiful. Overall, the OEM lenses made for them are excellent. They are hardy and reliable if reasonably cared for.

Be very cautious about buying used gear. Some good buys can be had on eBay but there's some junk out there too. Same applies to the used section in camera stores. Cameras and lenses are precision devices; even the hardiest do not survive the abuse some owners can dish out to them. Have someone experienced in buying used gear that you trust help you! You want a "right of return" within a reasonable time if something is wrong with it. One of the used equipment sources with a stellar repuation is KEH camera brokers in Atlanta (www.keh.com). They were mail order with a "dead tree" catalog long before the world wide web was around (and they still publish the catalog).

-- John L.

8/20/2001 12:02:51 AM

Jim Miotke
BetterPhoto Member
BetterPhotoJim.com
Owner, BetterPhoto.com, Inc.
  Hi Susan,

That eBay Pentax looks okay but the price will probably get up too high over the next four days. The lenses that come with it look pretty bad; therefore, I would consider it as the purchase of a camera body with a bunch of extras. I would not pay more that $125-$150 for the whole thing, myself.

8/20/2001 12:19:16 AM

John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/27/2001
  You asked about the Canon Elan 7. Let's drop back a step and ask what you want to do with your photography.

The Pentax, Olympus and Nikon would be geared for someone wanting to study photography and understand it thoroughly. (There are Canon equivalents to these that use Canon's FD mount lenses.) They tend to force the user to make decisions and very easily allow total manual control over everything. The control aspect is one of the reasons many pros still use them.

OTOH the current AF bodies with program modes are probably better for beginners who intend to do casual photography and want something with greater flexibility under varying or unusual conditions than a P&S. With many of them it's harder to take total control and make all the decisions. The Elan 7 is a decent AF Program mode camera body and certainly capable. If you go with an Elan 7 (or Nikon equivalent) I do recommend buying the body alone, getting a better lens than the 28-80mm or 28-90mm they are bundled with new, and getting a more powerful external flash.

Which direction I would recommend to a beginner, an older manual focus system or newer AF system with program modes, depends on what you want to do with your photography. There is no right answer, only the one you have for yourself.

-- John L.

8/20/2001 2:56:53 AM

Debbie Groff

member since: 5/25/2001
  I too, purchased a Canon Elan 7. My very first real camera:) I'm just having a slight problem with focusing. Well, actually, a BIG problem with focusing. Probably just a personal lack of knowledge. I was reading the comment about the 28-90mm lens, I have that one and the 100-300mm zoom. What is the problem with these lenses? As they are my first lenses and I have no experience with any other kind, so don't know what I'm missing? Just wondering what would be the problem with these lenses?

8/20/2001 8:49:03 AM

John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/27/2001
  Debbie,
There is no serious reliability problem I'm aware of with the 28-80 or 28-90 lenses bundled with bodies like the Canon's Rebel or Elan, or Nikon's N-65 or N-80. They are better than some found on consumer zoom P&S's. They are bundled with these bodies to provide a complete camera with a "starter" lens that can play "out of the box." However, they are at the bottom end of performance in their respective EOS and Nikkor lens lines.

Over a half-dozen factors are used to rate lens optical performance including resolution, contrast, aberrations, distortions, flare control, vignetting, bokeh, etc. (If you don't understand all these terms, just ask.) Some of these are not noticed as easily with 4x6 prints from fast film as they are with well made large prints or projected slides from slower films. Other aspects are noticeable regardless of print size or film used. IMO the lens and its optical qualities are the most important part of a camera; it's what puts light on the film when the shutter opens. I freely admit I'm very demanding of lens optical quality because of what I photograph, the slow extremely fine grain slide films used, and the large prints made from the slides.

Since Susan asked about used equipment and used camera bodies are usually sold by dealers without lenses. It's an opportunity for her to select a better "first lens" to go with it, and not break the bank doing it.

For your focusing problems, if you provide a few more details about the conditions under which they occur (light levels, distances, subject material, etc.), someone may be able to help you work through it.

-- John L.

8/20/2001 9:23:00 PM

John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/27/2001
  Oooh . . . might be a factor in your focusing problems . . . is your body an Elan 7 or Elan 7e?

-- John L.

8/20/2001 9:25:17 PM

Debbie Groff

member since: 5/25/2001
  My camera is an Elan 7. I do have a lot of questions about outdoor lighting, focusing, apertures, shutter speeds, as I am quite new to photography. Have been browsing through different categories and just purchased a 70-210 macro made by Canon, so... I found this site a few months ago and really enjoyed the time I spent here. Just got my computer then, and my first time on internet... got to looking around here and there, internet surfing, I think it's called :) And for some reason never got back. I feel now is the time to seriously start finding out answers to my questions. Just know this is the site to learn from. Thanks for your quick response back. You'll probably be hearing from me a lot...

8/21/2001 8:53:35 AM

Tom W. Hauber

member since: 8/17/2001
  Hi Susan, I have used a K-1000 for about 14 years, it was my first camera, and I still use it today more than my Canon EOS Rebel 2. The K-1000 is a very rugged outfit; mine has been wet, dusty, hot, cold - you name it - and it still takes great photos. I use Vivitar lenses and have taken wildlife and outdoor shots by the thousands. They always look great. You will not be sorry you bought a K-1000.

8/24/2001 5:56:29 PM

George Blades

member since: 5/29/2004
  A long time ago a friend gave me a tip which was the best advice I ever got! Nowadays it seems so logical though, but as a raw beginner, I didn't really appreciate the value of that advice. Simply put it was this....
"Think lenses!" I bought myself a Canon F-1 (yes, that long ago!), and it cost me an arm and a leg, and I paid for the best quality lenses I could afford. Needless to say, I had the lenses to thank for the beautiful photos I took ever since! I had a period where I gave up on cameras and photography for music and guitars, but I made the mistake of selling all my gear! Then around 1991, I bought a cheapo Canon EOS 1000F, but I still remembered the 'tip' and bought a good set of lenses. Matched to this cheap body, I wondered how the photos would look, but to my amazement, the results were spectacular! I still have this camera and my 10 yeat old son uses it, but loves the 'scene' modes as well as experimenting in Manual mode and using the 'PIC' modes as well. When I was 'robbed' of this camera by him, I bought a Canon EOS 3000 around 1999 and the old feelings returned! I found my passion for photography re-kindled and am now in competition with my son! We often 'talk cameras' and I am forever amazed at how he can take a photo using the 'scene' modes and then just jump right into full manual mode with the greatest of ease! He is totally convinced that he has learned how to take great photos by trying to 'emulate' in-camera what the scene modes do and he certainly has done a good job if it. Why am I telling you this? Well, when I started out, my camera was a manual one and the idea of having anything 'pre-programmed' into it would have been regarded as 'cheating', but I can see now that it does have more uses than simply allowing you to use the camera as a P&S job! The scene modes help you when you feel unsure about your ability in particular situations, and you have the freedom of full manual control when your confidence is high! Above all though, the body is not all that important, so remember that tip and "think lenese!".
Bodies will come and go, but the lenses you buy now will last forever! I wish you all the best with your camera, whatever it may be!
Geo.

5/29/2004 4:30:00 PM

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Photography Question 
Jorge Diaz Kropman

member since: 6/23/2001
  8 .  Canon Rebel 2000 vs. Nikon N65
Hello, I'm a beginner photo fan and I am looking for my first SLR camera. My budget is near US$400 and the best (in my opinion) cameras that I have found are the Canon Rebel 2000 and the Nikon N65.

I personally prefer N65 due to its 2.5 frame per second while Canon 2000 is 1.5 and I want to take sports photos, but this is how a beginner thinks...

Could some of you help me with your opinion? I will really appreciate your comments... (I will receive any kind of comments like "guy, why don't you by a Pentax because..." and I will appreciate them !!!)
THANK YOU ALL OF YOU !!!
Regards, Jorge.

6/23/2001 9:23:40 AM

Ray Blur

member since: 6/26/2001
  Personally I think this is an easy one Jorge... Go for the Nikon. With a metal lens mount it is definitely the better buy for long term use. The canon has a plastic mount, like most of there lower priced cams.

6/26/2001 7:31:20 PM

Jorge Diaz Kropman

member since: 6/23/2001
  Thank you Ray. I appreciate you time answering my question. I have seen too many ads for Rebel 2000 and very few ones for N65. I know this is only marketing, but it scared me a bit...
Your advise is very useful for me.
Thank you...
Regards, Jorge.

6/27/2001 7:23:22 AM

Elaine S. Robbins
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/14/2000
  I don't know if this is too late to help you, but...

I was in your exact situation a few months ago. I decided on the Canon 2000, mostly because the first time I held the N65 I jammed my thumb in my eye trying to turn the wheel on the back (shutter speed?). People whine ;) about the plastic lens mount and overall lightness to the Canon, but I've found I like it. Modern plastic is tough stuff. I took it hiking in the Badlands of North Dakota (pretty rugged terrain) and all that happened to it was I had to blow it out w/a can of air to get rid of about a mountain of dust in it. Plenty strong enough for me. The lightness and compactness is a huge plus for me as well. The metering system seems pretty good too, with a approx. 10% "spot-metering" feature that has come in handy. The on-camera flash is crap, though.

So for what its worth a month after you posted this question, I'd recommend the Canon.

--Elaine

7/26/2001 11:38:45 AM

Jorge Diaz Kropman

member since: 6/23/2001
  Thank you Elaine, it's not too late. I have been planning my wedding and this delayed the purchase. I believe I will buy the camera in September, so I'm still investigating.
Thank you very much...
Regards, Jorge.

7/26/2001 12:01:46 PM

River Side

member since: 9/10/2001
  I'm in the same decision making phase as yourself, but to me it looks like the Canon is an easier pick over the Nikon.

I discussed these cameras with a knowledgable salesperson at Wolf Camera and he suggested that overall Canon focuses in faster than Nikons cuz the autofocus is on the lens instead of the body. He also pointed out that most sports photographers use a Canon.

The 2.5 fps advance on the Nikon is restricted to it's Sports mode. With Canon you will have greater freedom.

I'm still pondering.. I think I will probably opt for the Nikon cuz I won't need the few extra features that the Canon has over it.

9/11/2001 12:09:20 AM

Ric 

member since: 6/8/2001
  I hope you have not purchased that NIKON

Go CANON, just starting out in sports photog work is difficult enough, if you go to the war without a CANON you will most certainly be beaten

Good luck

9/15/2001 7:20:13 PM

Mike 

member since: 4/25/2001
  This maybe to late(my computer has been down for some time) but I will throw my two cents in anyhow. I was in the exact same perdicament 1 1/2 years ago. I did some big time research and ask questions at abut 8-10 different photo shops from Seattle to Toronto. Everyone of them recommended the Nikon either F60 or 80. I chose the 60 due to price and toys I didn't need as an amateur (this was pre F65). Betterphoto.com also has a short questionaire you could answer on-line and it would help with the decision. I took it after I had already purchased my camera and the result was the Nikon F65. I also read in some internet articals that about 70% of professional photgrahers use Nikon. It all comes down to what your needs are. If your still looking and go to a few photo shops be specific when telling them what level of photographer you are and where you want to go with it. The more you ask, the better decision you will make. By the way, I love my Nikon and wouldn't trade for another make.

mike

9/16/2001 9:22:31 AM

Mike Turner

member since: 3/16/2001
  I too have made this difficult decision, my conclusion - rebel 2000.

I have had no problems with it and it has a lot of functions that I still have to master. I am no professional by any means and it has features that make it the best of both worlds. Completely manual, partially manual, to complete automatic. It also has features like bracketing, double exposure, and bulb(?) (the technique used to make the really narley pictures of lightning). Anyway, I am not sure if the Nikon offers all the same features, but the Rebel 2000, I think was my best purchase. Another sales point of Canon is that you can rent most of their lens from many stores nation wide, so that you don't have to buy lenses that you will only use once or twice. I don't know, it will be a tough decision for you but what I did was go around you town to camera shops and ask the clerks and get more than one opinion. Good luck.

Mike T.

9/17/2001 12:19:21 PM

Jorge Diaz Kropman

member since: 6/23/2001
  Hello people.
This is just to say THANK YOU ALL for your time and assistance with this.
I came back from my honeymoon last Saturday and I have finally purchased my camera.
I really appreciate your time for helping me with your comments. I'm a beginner now but be sure I'll be ready to help you all as much as I could...
Thank you all and we talk soon...

Just for comment, I bought an N-65. In my case Nikon defeated Canon for the use I think I will with my camera. Time will say,haha...
Thank you, JOrge

10/3/2001 7:38:41 AM

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