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Photography QnA: Printing Digital Pictures

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Category: All About Photography : Digital Photographic Discussions - Imaging Basics : Printing Digital Pictures

Find the best rated printer for printing digital pictures or find tips for making your digital pictures print out better in this Q&A.

Page 9 : 81 -90 of 94 questions

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Photography Question 
Paula J. Hoyal

member since: 6/27/2003
  81 .  How Megapixels Effect Picture Size
I know that the higher the megapixels the better image quality. My question is, if I own a 6 megapixel camera, am I going to be able to print small pictures such as a 4x6 or a wallet? If I am able to, what do I do to ensure that I get a quality print.

6/27/2003 9:15:51 AM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  The answer is found in your imaging program. With your camera, or with a scanner, maybe, you must have gotten some photoshop-based software, Photoshop LE or Adobe Elements. Maybe you got a propriety software from the camera manufacturer. There will be a screen in there (Image/Image Size in the photoshop-based ones) that lets you size your image for print. I think Elements can even give you multiple small prints on a sheet of paper. If you have Elements or Photshop lE, and you are having trouble, come back.

6/27/2003 9:24:06 AM

Michael Kaplan

member since: 5/27/2003
 
 
  Bird In Flight Original
Bird In Flight Original
Full Sized Original Picture
 
  Bird in Flight
Bird in Flight
Original Picture Cropped
 
 
First to directly answer your question, Yes, you can print ANY size print. It is settings in your program you are using to view or edit the picture that will adjust the size and resolution for your print. The difference is how good a picture you will end up with. If you are reducing the size then you will get an excellent print whereas if you are making a larger print, quality will decrease with the size and viewing distance. I have printed 13x19 and know of some people that have printed 20x30 and got what they considered good quality prints.

If you were only going to print 4x6 then there would really be no need for a 6MP camera but even then there are advantages to having the extra pixels.

The extra pixels will allow you to crop the picture. Take a snippit to allow a tighter view or enlarge something still leaving enough pixels to get a great quality print (see the Full and Crop samples below).

Hope this helps.

7/1/2003 5:21:57 AM

Gregg Vieregge

member since: 11/10/2000
  I reccomend Adobe Elements 2. It's user friendly and has a gret how-to help guide.

Using the crop tool you can set the height and width of the picture. Use the largest print size for portrait packages of various sizes from one image. Make sure the image resolution is 300 dpi. You can always go to edit, image size, and resize. For internet use lower the dpi to 100 or 72 and the image size to 4X5. Also find a good lab that will print for $2 per sheet. Yhis will save you $$ as ink jet is expensive. Good luck!

7/1/2003 6:10:18 AM

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Photography Question 
Liz Na Webber

member since: 12/26/2002
  82 .  How to Resize a Digital Photo for Lab Printing
 
We are so very brand new at this! We've just bought a Canon S30, and are snapping away like maniacs. When we submit the shots we want printed to our local photo shop, our dog's ears and/or tail are cut off on a 4x6 print when they seem to be all there when viewed on the computer! We have Zoom Browser, which came with the camera, and also Adobe Photo Deluxe.

2/27/2003 4:04:45 PM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  The Canon S30 creates images in 1:1.333 aspect ratio (example 1600 pixels wide x 1200 pixels tall). The width is 1.333 times the height. A 4x6 inch print is 1:1.5 aspect ratio. To fill a 4x6 inch print, your image has to be enlarged to 4.5x6 inches, and then the extra 0.5 inch of height is cropped off.

2/28/2003 5:57:10 AM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  P.S.
The 1:1.3333 aspect ratio was chosen as it is a perfect match to most computer monitors. The thinking was to match the digital camera's images to its most likely use: Web pages and emailed photos. Unfortunately, it is not a commonly used print size.

2/28/2003 6:02:02 AM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  P.S.S. ;-)
To get a "full frame" print you need to request that the printer not fill the long side. Have them enlarge to 4x5.3333 and leave the extra 2/3 inch of the print blank.

2/28/2003 6:05:46 AM

John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/27/2001
  Jon has described your problem well. Here are a couple more ideas. Don't know how much resolution your images have. If they can withstand enlargement to 5x7, try that size. If not, then try asking for 4x5 or 3-1/2 x 5 prints. All three of these standard print sizes are closer to the 3:4 aspect ratio of your camera than a 4x6 is. If you're using a consumer lab, they may not be able to do 4x5's, but it's worth asking. It's one of the two sizes pro labs use for medium format proofs (the other is a 5x5 square).

BTW, the 4x6 print size was created because it exactly matches the 2:3 aspect ratio of 35mm film, but it doesn't match much of anything else very well.

2/28/2003 8:16:23 PM

George E. Givens Jr

member since: 5/15/2002
  Now to throw a monkey wrench in the mix. Most smaller frames you'll find at typical department stores and consumer labs conform to the 3:2 (2:3 or 1:1.5) aspect ratio (actually this should be called resolution ratio). Then there's your 8x10 which 1:1.25. The botton line is send your film or digital prints to a pro lab that can print any size print you want. It is all too confusing. I always shoot at 3:2 when shooting digitally because I always send my digital prints to a pro lab. If you have a Cord Camera in your area they offer any size print you want.

3/5/2003 10:56:25 AM

Cheryl Meisel
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/5/2001
  I still don't understand this. I have tried everything. My camera's image size is 2560 x 1920. Now Ofoto will not crop any image that has a 1:1.25 aspect ratio, which this does not. This is for a borderless print in 8x10. I want to save as much of the photo as possible, but I can't figure out what the pixels would be to give this ratio. To make matters worse I found this on the net, and it seemed COOL but that's not going to work either as far as my figures do this to that aspect ratio.
Surely there is some way to do this rather then to cut off half your photo for a borderless print! Please check this out below and any help would be wonderful as I am so tired of trying this.
http://home.cinci.rr.com/creek/frontier_resize.htm

10/14/2003 1:09:27 PM

John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/27/2001
  Cheryl,

For maximum content on the 8x10 print (borderless), the long edge must be cropped from 2560 to 2400 pixels. Divide 1920 by four and then multiply the result by five. The print is an 8:10 aspect ratio (same as 4:5 and 1:1.125). This doesn't lose "half" the photo, only about 8% (about 1/12th).

I deal with this all the time when working with film, both 35mm small format and 645 medium format. Typically a slight amount of room along the long edge must be left in composing the photograph for the cropping necessary to get it onto a print. The one exception is from 645 to a 5x7 print that requires taking a very slight amount off of the short edge. BTW, 645 medium format is the same as most digitals, including yours, with a 3:4 aspect ratio, and cropping for standard print sizes bigger than the anomolous 4x6 (created solely for 35mm) isn't much.

10/19/2003 5:34:38 PM

Cheryl Meisel
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/5/2001
  Yes John thank you and I did know it was 2400 pixels I did the math 1000 times lol. I also know I was making it much bigger when I said half lol. But it is a good part of the photo and I just thought maybe there was another way but I guess not. Ahhhhhh well I guess I will SHOOT for that or try to in the future lol. Thanks!

10/19/2003 5:46:48 PM

Sue Cuevas

member since: 9/28/2002
  I too was frustrated with this problem. I am not good on all the math - ha ha. I have a Sony DSC-S85 4 megapixel. I use Walmart's photo lab and have been very happy with my prints. But I hate losing part of the picture in the crop! The only conclusion I came to was to make sure I was not zooming in too much when taking the picture as to not lose the top of a head or whatever. Also, If it is a really great shot that I do not want cropped off, I create a black panel from my digital software program (print shop or Adobe) behind the digital print which prints as a black border (you could use any color or design) and this way I print the full shot without losing any of the image you see on screen. The black border is somewhat shorter on one of the long edge but my whole picture is in tact. (As you can see I am very new and green so I have to be creative). My question is, if I by a digital SLR would I still lose some of my print when printing at a photo lab? I want an affordable digital SLR that does not have as much lag time too. Any suggestions anyone?

10/21/2003 8:10:39 PM

Jill M. Turnbull

member since: 10/19/2003
  What I do to overcome this problem is alter the canvas size to 4" x 6" (Using PhotoShop). This maintains the 4" x 5.33" image size and inserts a top and bottom border(approx .6)to alter the print size to 4" x 6". The borders can be cut off later.

10/22/2003 12:44:29 AM

Cheryl Meisel
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/5/2001
  Yes Jill this was what I was referring to. I had heard others doing this. hummmmmm this sounds good to me, I will have to try it. Thanks Cheryl

10/22/2003 4:42:30 AM

Cheryl Meisel
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/5/2001
  You might look into the Canon 300d Sue!

10/22/2003 4:45:47 AM

Sue Cuevas

member since: 9/28/2002
  Jill - I thought I tried this in Photoshop Elements and still had the same problem. But I will try again. (I certainly could have done something wrong!)

And Cheryl...thanks for the recommendation...I will look into this model. With an SLR is there still the problem with the cropping or do these cameras help preserve the whole image whe printed at a photo lab?

10/22/2003 5:16:51 PM

Cheryl Meisel
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/5/2001
  LOL Sue from what I hear it still is the same ball park there but you do have a larger pic to work with. 6mp so that might help! Cheryl

10/23/2003 5:01:29 AM

Sue Cuevas

member since: 9/28/2002
  I'm sorry if I sound ignorant about some of this...I am learning on my own - ha ha!. Anyway..reason I asked this is because I visited a professional photographer who owns a photo lab here in my town and he stated my problem was I needed a digital SLR because my Sony was a point and shoot camera and what I was seeing through the viewfinder is not really what I will get in my picture. Does that make sense? He said the SLR's are closer to a real 35mm camera and what you see is what you get. Is that true or am I totally out in left field???? I appreciate your patience and willingess to respond. :)

10/23/2003 5:13:33 PM

Piper Lehman
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/20/2001
  Hi Sue. This is partly true. You are actually looking "through the lens" with an SLR camera, hence the TTL acronym for focusing, metering, etc.

However, there is no digital SLR available at the moment that has a full, 100% viewfinder (not to my knowledge, anyway). ONly this really would be the opposite of your cropping problem since there will be slightly more image on the file than you saw in the viewfinder when snapping the shot. How much more varies with each camera and brand of system. I haven't found this to be an "unfixable" problem yet, but a lot of pros don't like not having the full deal. I'm sure it must become an issue with certain types of photography.

Hope this helps.

10/23/2003 6:53:34 PM

Piper Lehman
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/20/2001
  Cheryl,
Not sure what problem you're having with Ofoto. I always uncheck the 'zoom & crop' option over there because my digital photos lose info when they print for framing. I have learned the hard way to remember to compensate for this issue when shooting! Pay for enough 20x30 poster-sized prints with chopped tops, and you'll definitely remember to think about it beforehand! :) ARGH! I hate to waste money!

10/23/2003 6:58:00 PM

Sue Cuevas

member since: 9/28/2002
  Thanks so much Piper. I appreciate any and all info. I am learning to compensate according to the capability of my camera as well. I hate to waste money too. I ordered prints from DotPhoto and accidently ordered glossy instead of Matte. I'm hoping they correct the order! :)

10/23/2003 7:41:06 PM

Cheryl Meisel
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/5/2001
  Hi Piper! My problem was lol I DO UNCHECK the zoom and trim lol. But you have to have the EXACT size if you do that for borderless prints. The exact size is of course a CROP. I was just wanting to know ways to get around cropping off my photo get me? I have heard some give borders to their photo etc thus leaving little crop to the orig pic. That's what I meant laughing. I guess too I better start shooting more for that when I shoot. I hope you understand me now. I think I am going to try the add to canvas border thing. Sounds neat! Thanks again everyone. Cheryl

10/24/2003 9:29:53 AM

Cheryl Meisel
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/5/2001
  Sue the sony 707 and the 717 both have good view finders that is pretty darn close to what you see is what you get! They say the LCD screen is even better but I never use that myself. But really the sony's I speak of that's pretty much the same exact pic there you get when you look at it and shoot it. You just have to THINK I guess before you shoot the picture and THINK of the crop THEN by leaving room around your subject. Something I have to get use to doing here because I loved to fill the frame a lot lol. Or then we can try these things they told us here too! Up to you! Cheryl

10/24/2003 9:35:43 AM

George E. Givens Jr

member since: 5/15/2002
  Actually Cheryl, your so called professional photographer friend is only partially correct. He said "Anyway..reason I asked this is because I visited a professional photographer who owns a photo lab here in my town and he stated my problem was I needed a digital SLR because my Sony was a point and shoot camera and what I was seeing through the viewfinder is not really what I will get in my picture. Does that make sense? He said the SLR's are closer to a real 35mm camera and what you see is what you get." Actually, there are very few 35mm slr cameras with a 100% viewfinder and even only 1 dslr with 100% viewfinder and I think it is a Canon mode but I could be wrong about that.
Cameras that are non ttl are called rangefinders. When you look through the viewfinder you don't see exactly what the lens sees. You usually see less than what the lens see unless you are at close range in which case there is a phenomenon called parallax that enters the equation. I'll let you look up what parallax means. There a lots of really great cameras that are rangefinders including the Leicas' and many, many others. I would be very careful about taking what others say, including me. I would suggest a getting a really good book about photography like the book by Barbara London and John Upton titled "Photography". I believe it is in its 6th or 7th edition and is an excellent resource.

11/10/2003 7:55:53 PM

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Photography Question 
Susan Keith

member since: 1/24/2003
  83 .  Digital Layouts - Small Prints Not Clear
I have a Canon D60 and use PSP 7. I have designed a lot of great layouts for Senior portraits for 8x10's of serveral different poses, but when I size down my shots and then print, the smaller photos are not clear. Any help with this would be great!

2/19/2003 7:47:21 AM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  Two possibilities that I know of: If by "sizing down", you mean changing the dimensions only (Resample turned off), then you're doing the right thing. When you decrease the image size, the resolution SHOULD go up, because you're squeezing the same pixels into a smaller space.

If you are making a collage or placing pictures onto a blank page, the resolution of your page should be the same as the res of the pictures you're placing on it. If you're printing on an inkjet, these photos and the page onto which you're placing them ought to be at least 240 ppi GOING INTO the printer. 300 is fine, more may be overkill, but doesn't hurt anything.
If you're making edits to these pics and saving several times in JPEG mode, you might be degrading them. Do all this work in TIF.

2/19/2003 1:00:25 PM

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Photography Question 
Jamie Putnam
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/22/2002
  84 .  Good digital labs
I am going digital and would like to find a good online developer. I enjoy printing shots with my Epson 780, but for the really spectacular ones I would prefer a lab. I know alot of pros shoot digitally now and was curious to know what they do for prints.

7/22/2002 6:27:30 PM

Damian P. Gadal
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 4/22/2002
  I don't know what the pros are doing, but I've been very happy with Imagestation.com. There prices are resonable and the qualty is very good. I've ordered digital prints upto 20' X 30' for framing and have been pleased with the results.

hth

10/6/2002 2:52:25 PM

Damian P. Gadal
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 4/22/2002
  Make the their prices....

10/6/2002 2:53:10 PM

Giao N.

member since: 11/11/2002
  I'm not a pro either, but I like www.dotphoto.com. They advertise in Photo magazine and they seem to have the best values of all.

11/14/2002 4:18:31 PM

Denise N

member since: 4/15/2003
  I have been using Photoworks for years now and they have the BEST value. When I first got my digital camera, I searched the websites trying to find a "better" deal - so trust me, I've seen them all. Photoworks charges you 29 cents per 4x6 photo you have printed AND stores them on the internet for you for FREE for as long as you are a customer (meaning, you must purchase something from them - like photo developing - at least once per year). Their service is outstanding and I've NEVER had any problems with them at all. Plus, shipping is only $1.95 per digital print order - which is TERRIFIC! Try them out....

4/17/2003 9:27:20 AM

  I'm not sure if you have Wal-Greens in your area, but in the Atlanta area they are charging .29/print for 4x6's. It's on fugi paper which doesn't thrill me, but for the 4x6 album prints the price is right. Luckily my son has a professional color lab and in the last year has bought a digital lab to add to the film equipment. The price is really good there...lol!

5/4/2003 3:50:29 PM

Damian P. Gadal
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 4/22/2002
  Is there a catch with www.dotphoto.com?

How is the quality of their prints?

I need someone that does 16X20 prints....

5/4/2003 4:25:17 PM

Damian P. Gadal
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 4/22/2002
  I'd also be interested in custom sizes...

5/4/2003 4:26:47 PM

Jamie Putnam
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/22/2002
  Thanks for the responses everyone! Since I posted this question, I found a site I like. It is photoaccess.com and they seem to be very consistant and also very good. I like the fact that they have digital sizes and offer matte finishing. They are worth a try for anyone looking for a good digital developer! -Jamie

5/5/2003 6:41:11 AM

Amy M. Parish
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/25/2003
  I just sent an order in to Photoaccess...are you still happy with them, Jamie? Just curious. Was using Snapfish, like the prices and was mostly happy with quality. Lately, though, they consistency has been a problem between my smaller prints and enlargements--they don't match. Not a good thing whne selling prints to people. Any suggestions for best quality conisistency? Thanks

7/3/2003 10:47:53 PM

Amy M. Parish
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/25/2003
  Damian---I don't know if you have tried Dotphoto yet, I had and found that there quality was not all that great.

7/3/2003 10:49:15 PM

Jamie Putnam
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/22/2002
  Amy,
I still use Photoaccess. They do tend to be a little on the cool side, but if you are calibrated to their site they are very consistent. I find little difference if any, between my wallets and larger prints.
Let me know what you think of them.

7/13/2003 10:17:10 PM

Christopher Higdon

member since: 2/11/2001
  Please check out www.ezprints.com they offer these services, but they also have a www.ezprints.com/pro where you can set the prices of your photos after you have uploaded them, and send a link for the buyer. i.e. wedding photos.

9/2/2003 12:41:35 AM

Amy M. Parish
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/25/2003
  I responded to this over a year ago, but now am using www.MPIX.com and LOVE THEM! Also, Winkflash is new, and offers 4x6 prints for 16 cents. Just thought I would send this update.

3/6/2005 2:56:53 PM

Stephanie Sherwood

member since: 4/28/2004
  How is Mpix.com, I have been looking into them I like their prices, but is what you pay for what you get? is their shipping reasonable and fast? I love the print shop I work with that is local but I would also like to cut down on my costs. With mpix I havent seen it yet but can you do white border printing, and glossy finish. Also can you see your image before it is printed. to check for cropping and such.

3/8/2005 8:40:42 AM

Amy M. Parish
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/25/2003
  I LOVE Mpix! Their quality is really good, print texture is good and dig. pictures are nice and smooth if you submit good res files. They don't do color adjustments for you, so you have to make sure that is done ahead of time. If I were you I would get some samples and see how they stand up to what you have had printed before and also compare them to your monitor color. They don't do white border printing, if you are interested in that Winkflash does but I don't recommend them for pro prints. You don't get the option of glossy at Mpix either, but they do offer metallic finish prints which are cool. Other good things they do, mounting services, die cut wallets, easy to use upload and cropping pages, free black and white or sepia tone in the same order as color prints (their sepia is a really nice tone, not too yellow). Shipping is always $5 no matter how much or how little you order, and you ALWAYS get them back 4 business days after you upload. The paper they use is Kodak endura pro paper, and has the copyright imprint on the back. Try them, they are really good.

3/8/2005 9:07:28 AM

Chris J. Browne

member since: 3/11/2005
  I use Lifepics for digital prints. The are printed at an independent lab that uses a noritsu 3212 DLS printer for sharp images. You can request that they do NO corrections so you can send the same image 6 months later and it will be exactly the same - just what we expect from digital.

The lab is Art's 2001 Photo and is just one town away, but they also mail for low cost. They use Kodak Royal paper which has a thicker base and good quality.

The do redos when it is obvious that something is wrong. . .other places weren't so kind.

Chris Browne

3/11/2005 8:36:38 PM

Diane Dupuis-Kallos
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 12/27/2003
  I use Shuttefly.com and love them! Large sizes, regular sizes, and many novelty items are all fantastic! The photobooks make for great gifts! Be sure to check them out!

3/12/2005 6:11:43 AM

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Photography Question 
Freda F. Link

member since: 10/24/2001
  85 .  Printing software for photo package printing
Hi,I would love to buy the Packagizerlite program by Plug-In Systems,but it is a little to high for mr right now,Do you know of any other good program for printing customized photo packages? Do you know of any place that sells the packagizerlite for less than 200.00? Thanks.

4/11/2002 11:52:57 PM

Denise Montgomery

member since: 10/6/2001
  I use Qimage pro. It's a great program and if I remember right it has a free trial and purchase price is only $35.00. Great support also. Check it out at http://www.ddisoftware.com/qimage

7/21/2002 6:20:08 PM

Daryl P. Parcher

member since: 10/23/2002
  I found some software....Fotoslate. It was like 30.00. It allows you to create your own templates. It also has a large catalog of templates.

10/23/2002 4:33:30 PM

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Photography Question 
Lee Bogner

member since: 10/13/2001
  86 .  Printing in E-Book Format
Good day! Does anyone know how I would print an MS PowerPoint slide handput page, 2 slides per page on to a pre-formatted photo paper, specifically 5x7 size Kodak Premium Picture Paper? Software from the Kodak site, PicturePage, appears to allow me to print two different photographs on one sheet of paper - but I cannot figure out how to format the PowerPoint Hand outs - 2 slides per page - to print on this paper, 5x7 size Kodak Premium Picture Paper with 2 photos per page. Any input is appreciated!

2/11/2002 10:42:31 AM

James Miotke
BetterPhoto Member
BetterPhotoJim.com
Owner, BetterPhoto.com, Inc.
  I don't have any answer for you on this one, Lee. Maybe some pro PowerPoint user will come by and help us out.

2/14/2002 10:53:15 AM

George Corbin

member since: 1/26/2002
  Lee -- not sure I completely follow, but let me give it a shot:

* I'll print 2 shots to a page on regular 8.5 X 11 photo paper (not sure if you're saying that your single sheet is actually 5X7, and you're trying to print 2 images to it?).

* To print (powerpoint) 2 shots to an 8.5 X 11 page, click: file --> print --> in the Print pop-up screen, lower left, there's a box that says "Print what". This is a pull down menu. Select "handouts". Then, immediately to the right, there's a new pull-down for "slides per page". Select "2". This will print two consecutive slides on one 8.5 X 11 sheet, at about 5X7 in size each. Good luck!

2/23/2002 1:09:11 AM

Lee Bogner

member since: 10/13/2001
  Hi George, thanks for your quick response. I have the "handouts" 2 per page working from Power Point. And through Kodak software I can get two different photos per page - two 5x7s or two 4x6s (# cat881 7066) which then peel off like stamps from the Kodak 8x11 Picture paper. The trick is to both together. I am working to figure out how to get the PowerPoint hardouts to align with the Kodak paper. I am still investigating.
Regards, Lee

2/26/2002 1:40:56 PM

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Photography Question 
Lee Bogner

member since: 10/13/2001
  87 .  Picture Frames for 8.5 in. x 11 in. Digital Prints
Hi, I am printing some nice 8.5" x 11" shots on my Epson Photo 780 printer. I cannot find inexpensive frames or frames at all for that matter at local shops (Long Island, NY). I only find 8x10 which are too small and I do not have a good method to cut these photos without risk to the image. Any suggestions for brick and mortar or online stores? Your assistance is appreciated.

11/19/2001 2:26:41 PM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  If you do a lot of this, you might think about buying a mat (matte?) cutter. If this is a one shot deal, you can tell the people at a framing shop exactly what dimensions to cut the mat and what color you want. These could look great in an 11" x 14" frame.

11/19/2001 3:34:18 PM

Russell Cowger

member since: 7/26/2001
  In Oklahoma City I go to my local Wal-mart (no endorsement intended) and get really nice "Document Frames." There is not much of a selection-two or three styles but they are very nice frames. If not the correct color they could be sprayed, antiqued, etc. These are not the thin metal cheapies that stores sometimes have. In Oklahoma City, they run between 6 and 10 dollars. I hope that helps. Sincerely,

11/21/2001 12:39:54 AM

  Hi Lee,

I order all my frames through Graphik Dimensions Ltd. They have all styles from simple to fancy in all price ranges. They will cut to any size you need.

11/21/2001 2:03:15 AM

Kevin Cexton

member since: 6/1/2001
  I buy 11 x 14 frames and cut my matte out at 8 x 10.

7/1/2002 2:17:33 AM

Damian P. Gadal
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 4/22/2002
  I think you can get 8.5 X 11 certificate frames at Staples...

hth

10/6/2002 2:59:28 PM

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Photography Question 
James P. Hildebrandt
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/29/2001
  88 .  Digital to Slides
I was just wondering if it was possible to create slides from digital images. I know the new printing machines that they have for digital cameras actually exposes the image onto photographic paper that then gets developed. I was just wondering if they had one that exposed it onto a 35mm slide?

Thanks for the great website!!!

11/8/2001 8:22:08 PM

Jeff S. Kennedy

member since: 3/4/2002
  Yes it is quite possible to output a digital file to a transparency.

11/9/2001 3:30:18 AM

James P. Hildebrandt
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/29/2001
  Just to make sure, by transparency you mean a slide that will work in a slide projector? Any idea of how much and who would be able to do it?

Thanks again,

11/9/2001 8:01:50 PM

James Miotke
BetterPhoto Member
BetterPhotoJim.com
Owner, BetterPhoto.com, Inc.
  Yes - Jeff is referring to the kind of transparencies you are talking about.

Many photo labs use an imagesetter to make slides from digital files. One that I used to work with asked for 14MB TIFF files. Call around your local pro photo shops and see who offers this service and what kind of file size they need for quality slide output.

11/13/2001 2:14:24 PM

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Photography Question 
Duane D

member since: 10/25/2001
  89 .  Protective Spray on Prints Worthwhile?
On my earlier ink jet prints I used the old time photo spray, which at least kept every drop of water from ruining the image. It lengthened the life of image. Would this still be a helpful thing to do with the more durable prints now available on Epson and others?

10/31/2001 6:26:32 AM

Brian Arsenault

member since: 11/7/2001
  Duane...

I use a protective spray on all my inkjet prints for two reasons. First, it does prevent any water drops from damaging the print. Second, the spray that I use (Lumijet ImageShield) also has a UV protectant. I spray on 3 to 4 very light coats, alternating the direction (North/South then East/West) to get an even coat.

Good luck!

11/15/2001 8:41:21 PM

Lynette Anderson

member since: 1/11/2002
  Where can I get this protective spray? Also, Konica makes a waterproof photo paper. Would you recommend the spray or the paper? Thank you.

2/25/2002 10:57:13 AM

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Photography Question 
Lu 

member since: 10/8/2001
  90 .  Sony Camera + HP PhotoSmart Printer = Unclear Pics
I use a Sony digital camera (uses floppy disks) and HP Photosmart 1000 printer. Pics look great on PC but when I print them out, they are not as clear as they should be. I am using high gloss Kodak paper. Would changing to HP high gloss paper make a difference? Also for taking pics of people, what settings should I be using on camera and on printer. Something is NOT RIGHT and I am wasting photo paper. Please help. (My husband bought this camera but wants ME to learn how to use it).

10/8/2001 12:45:39 PM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  You're caught up in a common problem caused by the manufacturers' failure to teach us how to use digital equipment. There's nothing wrong with your camera or your printer.

Digital pics look great on screen. To get good prints, you should use the camera's highest quality and resolution settings. Look under JPEG compression and use the highest quality (the least compression) you can. Better still, if the camera captures in the TIF mode, use that. At these settings, you won't get as many images on a floppy. Just get more floppies. That's the price of having resolution sufficient for printing.

Digital images should go to the printer by way of your imaging software. Here you can size your image. Do nothing here that changes the file size (total number of pixels) of your image. For your purpose here, adjust the image so that the resolution reads 150 pixels per inch (ppi). This may not be an 8 x 10, but will be a decent print size. You can also adjust the brightness/ contrast, and fix dust spots.

Set your printer at a good quality setting. I doubt that a camera that stores images on floppies will give you a big enough file size to print at the full resolution capability of this printer. You want a printer setting that will give you a decent print with about a 150 PPI image file going INTO the printer. That setting may be about 600 dpi. I think you'll be surprised at the nice prints you can get from your set-up.

Try these tips and come back to us if you have a problem. Now give your husband a hug. He knew you were smart enough to go to the right place for answers.

10/9/2001 9:04:34 AM

Lisa Young

member since: 9/1/2001
  When I tried to use Kodak paper for my HP 952c, the colors ran. I told someone about it and they told me that HP has some sort of chemical process in their inks that makes you use their photo paper because it works best with HP photo paper. I tried it and they were right, no more smears and made some great photos up to 8x10 on it with the dpi set at 300. I run out of temporary memory if I set it any higher. By the way I have a Sony MVC FD-95 with 2.1 mp and use memory sticks for my photos. Good luck!

10/9/2001 7:33:47 PM

Valena Sturdivant

member since: 9/30/2001
  I believe the two responses before mine are correct. I had the same problem and the first thing I had to fix was my printer settings. Make sure you set your printer to photoenhance or the like for your printer. But MAKE SURE you set it back when printing text material or you will use more ink than necessary on your text material. Second I have an Epson printer and tried HP Photo paper and Kodak paper and it just won't work. You are better off using the same kind of paper as your printer. Another hint is that Photo Paper is a higher grade than Photo Quality Paper. The glossy, matte, or semi-glossy doesn't matter but try to always use Photo Paper made by the same company as your printer. Good luck!

10/9/2001 10:13:16 PM

  Lu, you didn't give us much information about your Sony camera. Having owned 5 diffrent Sony digitals, I have a bit of experience printing from them. If you have a camera with numbers from FD 71 through FD 91 even on the fine setting you will only get files around 150K. Not nearly enough to print 8x10. They do a good job on 3x5 and occasionally 5x7 The FD 95 averages about 350K and does a much better job. The FD 97 averages 850K and does a very respectable job on 8x10. The posts above about balancing your printer and paper are right on. I have had some success with Red River paper in both HP and Epson printers.

10/9/2001 10:38:13 PM

James Miotke
BetterPhoto Member
BetterPhotoJim.com
Owner, BetterPhoto.com, Inc.
  These are all right answers, complete with a lot of great tips, but I wanted to second Doug's last response in particular. Many of the floppy disk Sony Mavica cameras just cannot hold a big enough image on that little bit of storage. They are convenient and work excellent for onscreen images (which can be a tiny fraction of the size required for print).

What can you do? Try taking one picture at the highest possible resolution and quality. I say one because that is probably all that will fit on the floppy. Print it out and see how it looks. Before printing, try to make sure that the image resolution is no smaller than 150 ppi (and no bigger than 300 ppi). If it looks better, you're in business.

To get more than one image at a time, you MIGHT be able to utilize the Super Floppy disks. I think 3M makes them and they hold 120MBs, if memory serves. Check to make sure your camera can use it but if it does, you will get a lot more use out of your current camera.

Hope this helps.

10/10/2001 1:13:34 AM

Lisa Young

member since: 9/1/2001
  My Sony MVC FD-95 takes floppies and for the standard floppy at the highest image quality I can get four on it. So rather than constantly changing out floppies I bought the memory stick adaptor and a 64mb memory stick can hold 180 shots at the highest resolution for this camera. It takes 20 seconds between shots for downloads, but who knows how many seconds it would take to change out floppies. So that might also be an option for your Sony. Good luck!

10/10/2001 1:24:31 AM

Robert Allen

member since: 7/31/2001
  I use an Epson printer and print on Kodak paper with great results and only occasionaly adjust the printer settings. I am still learning as well.

10/13/2001 8:43:55 AM

Richard A. Etts

member since: 4/5/2002
 
 
  Burlington
Burlington
Photo Glossy Heavyweight
 
  Jet Print
Jet Print
Premium Photo
 
 
Lu, I own the HP 952C and I don't use HP paper (too expensive). I get Burlington's Heavyweight Photo Glossy (with the baby pic) and Jet Print Photo's Premium Photo Paper (with the barn scene) for all my printing. A 1000+ prints later I have none I didn't like. Both these papers are available at most any department store or office supply store. In your print settings chose HP Premium Plus Photo Paper to print. Hope this helps.

4/5/2002 10:01:05 AM

James Fuqua

member since: 6/11/2003
  I just started photography with a Canon PowwerShot A20. Not a very expensive camera but I get good prints up to 8X10 using my Canon S820D Printer. I have also tried all brands of paper and I get the best quality prints on HP paper. Maybe a little more expensive but I prefer it over Kodak or some of the other brands.

James Fuqua

6/11/2003 4:54:31 PM

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