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Photography QnA: Digital Photo Printers & Supplies

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Category: Best Photographic Equipment to Buy : Digital Cameras and Accessories : Digital Photo Printers & Supplies

Are you looking for professional digital photo printers? Wondering which supplies you will need to print out quality photos? Join this Q&A and get your answers.

Page 2 : 11 -19 of 19 questions

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Photography Question 
Kerrie 

member since: 4/29/2002
  11 .  Digital printing for mobile photographers
Hi
I am a professional mobile photographer using 35mm cameras and wish to venture into digital. I plan to offer portraits taken in a mobile studio in shopping centres printed on the spot.

I am hoping to get into this with out having the PC between the camera and printer! any ideas on what equipment would be suitable ....camera? Printer?....the largest I want to print on the spot would be
10" X 8" or A4.

Any suggestions are welcome thanks.
Kerrie

10/21/2002 10:25:13 PM

Jeff S. Kennedy

member since: 3/4/2002
  I'm not an expert in this area but I do know that Canon has interfaces directly between their cameras and their printers. So you might look in that direction. I have a G2 that is a very nice camera and it has that capability. If you are looking more at an SLR then you might look into a D30 or D60 but I don't know if they have the same feature.

10/22/2002 12:46:09 AM

Kerrie 

member since: 4/29/2002
  Thanks Jeff for your comment and infact I am interested in the Canons as all my 35mm gear is Canon. I have been told that I would need the PC as Photoshop is needed to enhance and correct certain images. I to have research a little on the D30 & D60 and yes these are what I would be interested in.

I need the answer to what the best combination of camera-PC-printer would be. Then I have to work out costs to see if this will be a viable venture.

Thanks again Jeff.
Kerrie

10/25/2002 4:50:27 PM

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Photography Question 
Colleen 

member since: 12/16/2001
  12 .  Printing Digital Phototgraphs
I take anitque style photographs (sepia) and have been using an 8x10 portrait camera and traditional darkroom processing for years. I'd like to move the entire operation to the digital age. Any suggestions on a photo printer that will provide supurb 8/10 prints in sepia tone? I am currently considering the Epson 1280 or Canon 900.

9/3/2002 5:21:29 PM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  The Epson 1280 is highly regarded as a photo quality printer. If you'll never need larger than 8 x 10, the Epson 890 will do just as well. No disrespect to Canon; I just don't know about them.

Watch new developments in this area. Read Shutterbug regularly. Using third-party inks with Epsons is possible, but it voids your warranty, and you must dedicate a printer to the third-party inks, and not mix them with Epson's. My guess is that Epson and others will address the needs of people who need truly professional results in the near future.

You've found a wonderful niche here. Don't give up your darkroom. Let customers know you can offer both options.

9/4/2002 9:42:53 AM

Tom Darmody

member since: 6/3/2002
  Colleen-

I'm in the same boat as you, I primarily use large format and do a lot of digital editing. I am totaly fed up with ink printers. I bought the Epson 2000p (a high end "prosumer" inkjet) it was advertized as "achival".

I had horrible color shift problems. Prints turning bright orange or green after a few weeks. The color shift problem has gotten better since the printer first came out, but it's still not 100% corrected. I started using Dicojet pigmented inks and Ilford papers and get decent results.

I an very concerned giving a client a print that may shift in a few weeks, so I only use the printer for proofing.

Epson has just introduced the 2020p inkjet that is suposed to be the "end all" of inkjets, that's what they said about the 2000p too. I'm going to wait a while and see what kind of results others get before I drop another $1000 on a junk printer.

I'm using Interneg or a photo recorder now post editing and printing in a wet darkroom.

9/4/2002 10:20:25 AM

Vincent Lowe

member since: 4/2/2000
  Have a look at Lyson 'Small Gamut' inks. They use a small amount of colour to give subtle control of the hue of monochrome images. They are not cheap but claim 'archival' permanence. I haven't used them myself so can't speak from personal experience. See http://www.lyson.com for more info.

9/6/2002 4:31:35 PM

Gregg Vieregge

member since: 11/10/2000
  Junk the ink jet printers. Get the Kodak 8500 professional. ($995) This is the ultimate printer, no chemicals or ink jets cartriges. $1.75 per 8X10 on Kodak professional paper. Comes with Adobe Elements.

9/8/2002 10:19:42 AM

Amie Kyte

member since: 1/8/2002
  I HAVE AN EPSON PHOTO PRINTER WHICH HAS PERFORMED WELL UNTIL RECENTLY. I'VE HAD IT ABOUT A YEAR AND NOW I HAVE TO CLEAN THE PRINT HEADS SOMETIMES 3 OR 4 TIMES A DAY... IN ORDER TO GET RID OF THE LINES IN MY PHOTOS. THIS PROCESS USES LOTS OF INK AND IS VERY ANNOYING. I'VE RESEARCHED ON THE NET AND FOUND LOADS OF THE SAME COMPLAINT. GOOD LUCK, I WISH I HAS THE ANSWER FOR YOUR PERFECT PRINTER BUT I CAN'T SEEM TO SETTLE BETWEEN CANON AND EPSON. CANON IS SAID TO BE MUCH FASTER BUT WHO KNOWS, THERE ARE NEGATIVES FOR THEM ALSO!!!

1/18/2003 12:24:04 PM

Gregg Vieregge

member since: 11/10/2000
  Don't even consider ink jet. Get the Kodak 8500. It uses a sublimation process. (no ink or chemicals) It come with Adobe elements. Bring up an image, go to color, remove color, tab on varitions, add one click of magnenta and then one click of cyan and you have the best most consistant sepia you'd ever want. A bonus, the 8500 lays an overcoat on the matt ribbon which allows yows you to run the print under water and no domage plus it's impossible to tear the print in half, it's that strong. If you want to go to the next level of professional digital photography I strongly urge you look at the Kodak 8500.

1/18/2003 5:54:59 PM

Gregg Vieregge

member since: 11/10/2000
  Should you want a great digidtal camera to go along with the Kodak 8500 printer get the Fuji s2 Pro. You'll never go back to film, 35 or 6X7 format, it's that good!

1/18/2003 5:59:53 PM

Amie Kyte

member since: 1/8/2002
  Hey Gregg, I'm Amie K. (look above)! I love the idea of ditching ink jets. Can you give me some info? I want to know if the Kodak 8500 is expensive to use. I print 4x6 from my Canon G2 mostly for scrapbooking my child's life and occasionally an 8x10. I'm willing to pay the $999 if it's worth it. My email is amiekyte@naxs.net if you want to respond or just post here. Thanks sooo much. I don't want to blow it with another "print head clogging" machine.

1/18/2003 7:04:16 PM

Gregg Vieregge

member since: 11/10/2000
  The printer is $995. You have to buy the photo paper which is a heavy stock plus the ribbon. The printer passes the paper through four sheets/layers of the ribbon. (tellow, red, blue and the overcoat which is like a clearcoat on a cars paint finish. (It come in mat or glossy)

The paper comes in a 2-pack of 50 for 100 sheets. A full sheet is 8 1/2 X 12 but the print area is 8X10. The printer comew with abobe elements 1 but I suggest upgrading to Elements 2. The reason os both have a full selection of printing packaes but Elements 2 allows you drop different pictures on one sheet so you don't waste paper. The estimated cost of the paper and the ribbon is $1.75 per 8X10 sheet. I am a professional photographer and use the 8500 for most of my prints. There is no color shifting and the qoality is is extemely sharp.
Good Luck

For more luck go to www.kodak.com/go/ptofrddopmal. Go to printers and you can see the detail or just enter Kodak 8500 on your search engine.

1/19/2003 1:45:45 AM

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Photography Question 
Stanley Driscoll

member since: 7/26/2002
  13 .  Recommendation for good digital photo printer.
 
I have been working with HP 940 printer to learn about digital photo printing. Now that I have purchased a Nikon 5700 camera, I am ready to become more serious about photo printing. What would you recommend?

7/26/2002 3:03:47 PM

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Photography Question 
Jean-Claude Boulay

member since: 5/10/2002
  14 .  Can you recommend a best Photo Printer Under $1K?
Good Afternoon,

I plan to start a home-based digital photo business and eventually move to a business location. There are so many photo printers out there for home and business use. I need a Digital Photo Printer that generates "exceptional" photo outputs. Can you recommend a photo printer that can do this without a problem? I have an Epson Stylus C60 $120. I bought this printer because it was recommend on consumer report. But, when I printed my digital photos, they came out looking tirribly with dard spots and lines.

So, Can anyone recommend a "best" digital photo Printer that I can buy under $1,000.00. This printer should print 8 1/2 x 11 photo prints.

Also, Is there a best photo software out there. I now have Photosuite, Canon Photo ZOOM photo software, Scannner & Camera Wizard, Dell Photo software, Epson Photo Software, among others. I am confused about all these photo software and I just want to use a good one--Please help.

Please Advise
Jean-Claude

5/10/2002 5:01:39 PM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  For the professional use you want to make of imaging software, look at Adobe Elements, as a minimum. This light version of Photoshop might do all you need it to do. More importantly, the terms used for all important operations will be the same as in Photoshop. You can then make use of the tips in books and magazine articles. The problem with the freebie and cheaper imaging programs is that they're a Babel of terms, often being different for the sake of being different. You won't go wrong with Elements, for under $100. Register your Elements, and you may get a good deal to upgrade to Photoshop 7.0 some day.

I've had great luck with an Epson 870 printer (890 is the new version). I think something's wrong with the file you're feeding into the Epson C60, OR maybe there's a software conflict. Try turning off Norton Antivirus. It plays havoc with Photoshop and printing. Try running your C60 problem by Epson. I've found them quite helpful.
Sorry, I'll be out of contact via e-mail for a while.

5/15/2002 9:33:06 AM

Johnathan R. Peal

member since: 3/11/2002
  I have a HP Photosmart 1315 that I'm happy with. The photo output is excellent and see no dots to the naked eye. It's an ink jet that uses dots for the photo. It has and LCD display to preview your photo's directly from the printer and has memory slots. It's approx $399.00.

Another printer that I would consider is the Olympus P400. It's approx $800.00 and is a dye Sublimination printer. It prints 8x10's and has an LCD preview and memory slots. With Dye sublimination you get continous tones with no dots. I have never used this printer so I cannot speak as to print quality but usually dye sublimination is true photographic output. If I didn't already have the photosmart this is the printer that I would probably buy.

Here is a link to the Olympus site.
http://www.olympusamerica.com/cpg_section/cpg_product_lobbypage.asp?l=1&bc=23&p=19&product=632

5/16/2002 10:37:51 AM

Paul Smith

member since: 5/6/2003
  I use the P400 as my standard photo printer in a part time business. For the money nothing comes close, it really is outstanding. The consumables are not cheap, but the quality more than makes up for it

5/6/2003 2:13:05 AM

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Photography Question 
Debi M. Lewis

member since: 2/26/2002
  15 .  where can I buy specialty papers
I want to be able to print trading cards for my clients. I know there are pre-perforated glossy ink-jet papers outt there... but I can't find them! Do you know where I can find these papers for trading cards??? Thanks for your help!... Debi

2/26/2002 11:57:09 AM

Jean-Claude Boulay

member since: 5/10/2002
  Hello Debi,

My name is Jean-Claude Boulay (jcdboulay@yahoo.com). I am a hobbyist in the Photo Field but I plan to open a family photo studio.

To answer your question...
For volume buying , try the Internet. Search for "perforated glossy" in quotation. But for now, I would go to office depot or OfficeMax or Wolf Camera to see what they have. That way you can browse to see brand names, type, feel texture , size and price before you can place order on the Internet.

Here's Kodak web site selling these items:

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/corp/store/catalog/Category.jhtml;jsessionid=VFV3U5APPYXGLQHIO2SHWGI?CATID=10


http://www.kodak.com/US/en/corp/store/catalog/Category.jhtml;jsessionid=VFV3U5APPYXGLQHIO2SHWGI?CATID=885

Hope this helps...
P.S. I also asked a question on this site about bying a quality photo printer. Can you respond to it?

Thanks

5/11/2002 1:43:22 PM

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Photography Question 
Julie K

member since: 3/7/2001
  16 .  Buying a Printer for B/W Photography
Hello,
I am a darkroom photographer who has recently decided to try digital imaging. I bought a scanner and Photoshop 6, and now need a printer that can produce darkroom-quality results. As this is my first foray into this type of photography, I want a quality printer, but something that will not break the bank (the bank in this case is anything over $300.00)

I work only in b/w and my scanner has 1200 x 2400 dpi. Any advice/suggestions on buying a printer would be greatly appreciated! Thanks,

1/16/2002 2:51:18 PM

Martin Ebbesen
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/8/2001
  Hi Julie,

If you only work I B&W, I would suggest that you have a look at a laser printer, HP make great ones but also Minolta I think makes laser printers. The advantage over the inkjet printers is that the price you pay, for every page you print is smaller and you can print on any paper.

Hope this helps.

1/16/2002 4:07:48 PM

Vincent Lowe

member since: 4/2/2000
  Try 'Quad Black' inksets for Epson Photo printers. Replaces the coloured inks with three shades of grey. Results are stunning. I use Epson 1160 but I think this has now been discontinued. More info at www.lyson.com or www.marrutt.com Marrutt will supply a test print plus the original file on CD-ROM.

1/16/2002 5:35:01 PM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  George DeWolfe is a pro who uses just such a technique. See PC Photo magazine, Dec 2000. The technique he describes will work on an Epson 890 printer ($300), if you don't go over 8 x 10. Want bigger? The printer is gonna cost you more, $500 for the Epson 1280.

You may be happy printing B&W on these printers without using 3rd party inks. To do this, you print B&W using the COLOR inks. You may get an off color cast, but, you can correct that in the printer software. The special inks, though, will probably get you better images, contrastier, and a better gray scale. See www.inksupply.com for info on these inks.

BTW, Julie, you'd get better results scanning off the neg. The HP S-20 film scanner, maybe discontinued, scans B&W quite well and can be had for maybe $400. If you are serious about scanning negs, a Nikon scanner in the $800 range will serve you well, especially since you don't need the advanced color settings of more expensive scanners.

We'd love to see some of your work. Check out Galleries here and get one of your own.

1/17/2002 7:52:15 AM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  I just saw Vincent's (see his reply above) Gallery on this site: http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallByMember.asp?mem=13745

Stunning B&W! I think we'd both better listen to him.

1/17/2002 7:59:03 AM

Julie K

member since: 3/7/2001
  Thanks to all who responded! Your suggestions were a big help to me; the business of buying new technology is confusing to say the least, and your comments help "clear the mud" so to speak. Once I'm up and running, I am definetly opening a Gallery on this site, as I currently enjoy all your Member Galleries.

Thanks again,

1/17/2002 12:50:11 PM

Vincent Lowe

member since: 4/2/2000
  Thanks for the compliment Doug! I intend to try for the RPS Fellowship this year with a set of monochrome inkjet prints - I'll let you know how I get on.

1/17/2002 3:30:40 PM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  For an interesting opinion about digital B&W vs. chemical-and-paper, read the interview with Ralph Gibson in the Feb issue of Shutterbug magazine. He also has interesting comments about a lifetime of photography.

1/28/2002 8:41:48 AM

Vincent Lowe

member since: 4/2/2000
  I don't think Shutterbug is available in the UK - I've looked on their Web site and it appears to be sold only in the US, and the article isn't posted on the site. Can you give us a brief run down of his conclusions?

1/28/2002 2:08:02 PM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  Ralph Gibson doesn't like digital scanning and printing, but I'm not sure why. He does have a really elemental style of photography-very simple, stark compositions, often with high grain very visible. It seems that he values his exposure, developing and printing as a painter would his paint mixing and brush methods, and sees no advantage in digital. He talks about shooting for no one but himself, and abhors shooting for a market. He's an accomplished artist; I'm not, so what can I say? I'll copy and send it to you, if you'd like.

1/29/2002 7:40:23 AM

Vincent Lowe

member since: 4/2/2000
  Thanks for the offer but I think I see where he's coming from (damn, I swore I'd never use that cliche). I can understand his 'purist' outlook but personally I've found that digital has opened up a whole new branch of photography which has presented a new set of challenges. Similarly, I supply to a couple of picture libraries and have found that some of the things on their 'wants' lists have again offered subject challenges that I wouldn't otherwise have thought of (I'm often amazed at some of the stuff they ask for, e.g. "Aircraft ejector seat, preferably being used". Yeah, right). Ralph Gibson is lucky if he is able to make a living purely from 'fine art' photography but there are not many who can, certainly on this side of the pond. But I seem to be getting away from the initial point of this thread so I'll shut up.

Vince

1/29/2002 2:05:26 PM

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Photography Question 
Duane D

member since: 10/25/2001
  17 .  Protective Spray on Prints Worthwhile?
On my earlier ink jet prints I used the old time photo spray, which at least kept every drop of water from ruining the image. It lengthened the life of image. Would this still be a helpful thing to do with the more durable prints now available on Epson and others?

10/31/2001 6:26:32 AM

Brian Arsenault

member since: 11/7/2001
  Duane...

I use a protective spray on all my inkjet prints for two reasons. First, it does prevent any water drops from damaging the print. Second, the spray that I use (Lumijet ImageShield) also has a UV protectant. I spray on 3 to 4 very light coats, alternating the direction (North/South then East/West) to get an even coat.

Good luck!

11/15/2001 8:41:21 PM

Lynette Anderson

member since: 1/11/2002
  Where can I get this protective spray? Also, Konica makes a waterproof photo paper. Would you recommend the spray or the paper? Thank you.

2/25/2002 10:57:13 AM

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Photography Question 
John Sandstedt
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/8/2001
  18 .  Has Anyone Compared Epson and Canon Printers?
I want to buy a color printer that will produce archival images, yet serve as a text printer. All of the literature I've read focuses on image quality to the degree that it's unclear whether the unit can be used for text printing.

Also, there are a lot of commercial photo shops using Epson printers. However, the promo prints from the new Canon S600 and S800 [on high print quality paper, not photo paper] seem as good or better. Any experiences with these units would be appreciated.

8/20/2001 8:51:41 AM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  Inkjet printers these days all give decent text quality, especially the major brands you mentioned. If you run a business, an office, or are an educator who needs a lot of high quality text printing, get a laser printer for that purpose. Otherwise, your Epson or Canon will serve you well enough. The current Consumer Reports has an article comparing printers.

I bought an Epson 870, partly based on a promo print. Although I am thoroughly satisfied with the Epson, I cannot reproduce the print quality of the promo print in the 8 x 10 they showed. This is probably because I can't scan 35mm at the resolution needed for 480 ppi going into the printer to get 2880 dpi output. The companies aren't lying to us; the promo print WAS done on their printer. The digital image being printed, however, may not have been prepared with equipment easily affordable for you and me.

8/21/2001 9:13:00 AM

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Photography Question 
Dennis 

member since: 7/17/2001
  19 .  Equipment to Scan and Print
I'm a keen amateur with about 30 years of slides, prints, negatives (mostly 35mm), etc. Thousands of images in all sorts of film but mainly Kodak. Old prints include hand-me-downs from generations but also prints in glossy and matte, different sizes, and so on.

I want to organise it to archive most of it and to print some of it for albums for my kids. I want to ultimately make most of the prints 6 X 4s.

Here are the questions:

1. What's the best way to scan these? I've been thinking about the HP S20 but I note in the specs that it only scans to 300 dpi optical for prints but 2400 for slides and negatives. Is the 300 dpi enough for printing. What does the optical mean?

2. What printer should I use? (I've never used a colour printer before.) What advantage does the HP Photosmart printer have over a colour deskjet? I've got brochures on Photosmart 1000, 1215, and 1218, but I can't evaluate the important differences (other than price).

3. To put prints into an album and protected with cellophane, is photopaper necessary or would a good quality paper be OK?

I hope someone can assist.

Thanks.

Dennis

7/17/2001 12:57:30 AM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  Dennis
The HP S20 is the only film scanner I know of that will scan prints (up to 4 x 6) as well as negatives and slides. 300 pixels per inch is fine for prints, unless you want to greatly enlarge them. Scantips.com can tell you more about the resolution for scanning for different purposes. I'd scan the slides and negatives at the full 2400 ppi.

A scanner's (or digital camera's) optical resolution is the true resolution that's being scanned. Anything else is interpolated resolution, in which the software adds pixels to fake a higher resolution. The HP scans a true 2400 ppi for film.

Try the color deskjet with the company's best photo grade paper, and see if the result is acceptable. HP and Epson, maybe others as well, make excellent photo quality inkjet printers. See sphoto.com for a review of a Photosmart printer. See luminous-landscape.com for information on the Epsons. The Epson 870 can be had from Epson's web site at an amazing $150. I can attest to the quality of their prints. Always use the manufacturer's best paper. Epson has a glossy and a matte finish. It's amazing how many retailers try to sell printers based on how they print on typing paper.

Nikon's film scanners have an edge over HP in terms of shadow detail with dense slides, but the Nikon won't scan a print, as does the HP. I'm pickier than most people. Many people find the HP's performance just fine. Sphoto.com can tell you more. HP's product support is exemplary, as is Nikon's.

7/17/2001 9:18:37 AM

Dennis 

member since: 7/17/2001
  Wow, Doug. Such a quick response and so helpful. Your answers have helped me heaps. I will take an image to the merchants and get them to try out different printers for me, using photo quality paper.

Appreciatively,

Dennis

7/17/2001 10:23:55 PM

William Snyder

member since: 11/11/2000
  I would go with a Nikon film scanner such as LS2000 and, if you can afford it, buy a seperate flatbed scanner for the prints. You will want more than 300ppi if you are going to enlarge the prints at all. I had a hp s20 and it was ok for a while, I have since upgraded to a Nikon and I am much happier with my final print output. The hp 990 is an excellent photo printer. Good luck
Bill

7/26/2001 4:06:08 PM

Johnathan R. Peal

member since: 3/11/2002
  I use the HP Photosmart 1315 printer and I would highly recommend this printer. It accepts Compact Flash Cards, Smart Media, Memory stick and IBM Microdrive right on the printer. It has it's own LCD display so that you don't need a computer to size, print and do some basic editing/color correction etc... directly from the printer. It has a tray for 4X6 paper which is nice. You can also use the memory slots to download pics to your computer from the printer. The quality of the photo's on either HP or even Epson glossy photo paper is awesome. I cannot tell the difference from studio developed prints. HP recommends HP paper for best results. It comes with great software that easily lets you size your photos and print them out. It also comes with ACDSee software which is really nice for color correction and basic editing. I use the supplied software and Adobe PhotoDeluxe for advanced editing, brushes, etc. It's a bit pricey but worth every penny $399.00 retail I believe. Hope this helps.

3/12/2002 8:55:50 PM

Dennis 

member since: 7/17/2001
  Thanks Johnathan,

As it happens, I've made my choices and bought a Nikon Cooscan ED IV which I'm very pleased with. I also got an Epson 895 printer and it is superb, although thirsty for ink. I've decided to use it mainly to check printed colour and "one-off" prints. Part of the reason is cost and experience but also, the only paper I can get here (Singapore) is sized A$ which cuts into four 4.15" X 5.85" prints. It's a fag deciding on the relative dimensions of the print before scanning.

What I do now is scan my images for 6 x 4 and burn them onto a CD. I usually make two scans - one for printing and one for the monitor. I know I can resize the TIFF image to JPEG but I seem to get a smaller file at adequate resolution when I rescan.

Thanks for your thoughts.

Dennis

3/12/2002 9:04:06 PM

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