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Photography QnA: Photographic Field Techniques

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Category: All About Photography : Photographic Field Techniques

Ready to learn about field technique for large object photography? How about for small object photography? This Q & A covers it all. Or if you are interested in private instruction, check out Kerry Drager's Field Techniques: Light and Composition online photography course.

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Photography Question 
Susan Shepard 

member since: 5/20/2007
  91 .  Underexposure Problems
Does underexposure causes problems with Raw files? And, if so, is this further affected by a smaller digital camera?

5/20/2007 12:26:52 AM

  Underexposure can often be the source of digital noise in many digital cameras and brands. If you over-simplify this to consider the effect under-exposure has on film, you will have similar difficulties. One of the keys is to be aware of in-camera meter readings, and know when your exposures are not going to be their best. At that point you can either accept the risk, or make adjustments (e.g., using a faster lens, changing the ISO, etc.).
Underexposure is not only an issue with RAW, it will likely cause additional noise in other file formats, and in many cameras - more and less depending on the brand of camera and the extremes of exposure.
OK?

5/20/2007 5:21:52 AM

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Photography Question 
Susan Shepard 

member since: 5/20/2007
  92 .  Automatic Vs. Manual?
Should I use auto settings? In other words, will I get good results?

5/20/2007 12:25:40 AM

  Depending on your equipment, auto settings will do a fine job for normal exposures. But what is considered "normal" may be in question. If a scene is one where you are not pushing the limits of the exposures, and you are not interested in controlling depth-of-field or stopping action, then you will be happy with auto-results. However, if you want to use your equipment to control the results you get, understanding manual modes, what they affect, and how to use them will likely be to your advantage.

5/20/2007 5:26:38 AM

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Photography Question 
Donna Dunbar
BetterPhoto Member
Contact Donna
Donna's Gallery

member since: 5/6/2003
  93 .  Lighting Problem
This weekend, I did several sessions with senior portraits. The problem I had was so weird and I was wondering if anyone had ever had the same problem. I never changed the possition of the lights, and no settings on the camera were changed, yet when I took one portrait, it would be OK and the next would be completely dark. I checked the strobes to see if possibly I had one flash bulb going out, but when I checked them they seemed to go off every time. I'm completely baffled. Any help would be appreciated. Also, could it possibly have anything to do with my memory card? It's been used a lot?

5/13/2007 3:22:53 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  Bad sync cord making inconsistent strobe tripping? Shooting before recharging? Wireless remote has weak batteries? Sync cord pin doesn't connect well with the pc outlet?

5/13/2007 3:29:56 PM

  Thanks for your input, I never once thought of the sync cord and it's possible that may be the problem. I'll check it out.

5/13/2007 3:34:23 PM

Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/4/2004
  Gregory gave you all the right answers. Most times, it is just us shooting before the refill on the strobes.
This probably has nothing to do with a CF card. Also moving your lights should never lend a problem as well. I move them constantly as they are on rollers for ease of movement.
I just wanted to assure you that it is most likely something small - as Gregory said, maybe a bad sync and/or connection. Wishing you the best,
Debby

5/14/2007 7:39:40 AM

  Thanks to both of you for your input, I think I discovered the problem at least part of it, little granddaughter's hands who know better than to be in my studio must have flipped the button on my slave flash so it thought it was the main source which was causing very harsh shadows and even sometimes dark images and making the whole set up out of sync. I just did some test shots and I believe things are ok now. I hope so because I am doing 2 of the shoots again today but I think we'll get the results we want

5/14/2007 8:57:53 AM

David 

member since: 1/13/2005
  Another possibility is that you had spot metering on (if your camera supports it) and you were not in manual. Then slight movement of the camera and/or the subject could result in metering in substantially different places.

5/15/2007 5:18:27 AM

Joe Ciccone
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/7/2005
  I don't think this was your problem, but just in case...could you have been in a exposure bracket mode?

5/15/2007 5:51:30 AM

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Photography Question 
Mac 

member since: 11/10/2005
  94 .  Photography Studio Gig
Hi. I make my living as a programmer, but would love to work as a portrait photographer. I have the opportunity to start a part-time job at a "Olan Mills" type of studio. How much of a benefit do you think this would be for me? I know it isn't the same as mentoring for an independent studio, but I think the exposure would probably be good for me. Any thoughts?

5/11/2007 5:06:33 AM

  You'll definitely gain experience, but these are cookie cutter places and have a specific look that they want, and they want it done "by the numbers." So, you'll learn their method of doing things, but there is no room for creativity. These types of organizations are fine for quick turn over and assembly line work, like high school pictures. You may find the hours worked to pay ratio a bit under what you may expect.

Editor's Note: BetterPhoto.com offers several excellent portrait photography courses, all taught by long-established working professionals:

- Portrait Lighting on Location and in the Studio
- Studio Portrait Lighting
- The Business of Photography

5/11/2007 5:28:00 AM

Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/4/2004
  I do agree with a lot of what Tony has said. But I must say, I have met a lot of those who start out on their own and it takes them 2 to 3 times longer to learn how to pose their clients, relate to their clients, learn pricing, take control of their studios and master some of the other aspects you will learn from spending ONLY a couple months in a corporate studio environment.
I have taught corporate studio photographers and developed new company training concepts for years and do know how much it can offer those really interested in studio photography. I still do both and my own studio work as well. And old- fashioned "traditional" posing is very hard to find taught anymore. I was called back to a company that tried to cut it out and go all< "new lifestyle" (styled candid) and found that their clientel wanted both! They want new and trendy, but they also want that traditional portraits that hung in the family home while they grew up. So they put it back and numbers soared.
I advise this type of learning experiance for anyone who will take the time. I hope this helps.

5/11/2007 6:42:01 AM

Michael A. Bielat
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/23/2007
  Mac, get in touch with me...
Email or Private Message me.

I too am a programmer by day but started my own business and would be more than happy to give you a rundown of my experiences.

Your programming experience is a blessing in disguise!

Talk to you soon!

6/25/2007 7:51:32 AM

  Hi Mac,
The hardest part of learning how to be a photographer for me was learning how to do business. You may learn this at the studio. But you need to decide if you can put the resources to open a studio. If you canít do that now you wonít have too much more money after you work for the studio. People donít spend enough time considering how they will make it through their first year in business. There is an article on my site about building a home studio, which might help.
Thanks, John Siskin

6/26/2007 5:51:20 PM

Michael A. Bielat
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/23/2007
  True John s.

Photographers can really make a killing in this day and age if they play their cards right.

I mean you have to be good first off. Without that, you have nothing...

Secondly, you can make due with only taking out maybe a 7-15k business loan at most... All you "really" need is a good professional DSLR, a backup of little lesser quality, a couple flash units (portable, Quantums, or Speedlights for creative lighting), and a couple pieces of GOOD glass. You would also just really need a current, fast desktop computer or a portable fast laptop / large monitor, monitor calibrator, photo editing software and workflow software and a bunch of external hard drive space for backups and archiving.

All that is reasonable and could quite honestly be paid off for in the first year of business.

I am booking jobs a year and a half in advance while only having 2 Canon EOS 30D DSLRs, a couple Canon 580EX (I & IIs) and some great glass. I also have studio lights but rarely use my home studio... That is for sports and karate school photography which I do for only like a week out of the year.

I have a Macbook Pro, a bunch of photo editing software and a desktop which I custom made myself and 2 nice Dell 22" monitors.

I saved cash by being a programmer by designing my own flash website (would have cost 7-14k for another company to do it for me) and I designed ALL my printed materials from my logo to business cards to flyers.

Be sure to get involved in the Internet. Free advertising for the most part. Also, word of mouth trumps all!

Instead of all the in home studio deal, you could go the route I did where you simply meet the clients at a coffee shop or something. It gets them relaxed and you are buddies with them when you buy them a coffee. It makes them feel like they are chatting with one of their friends. Just sit and relax with them, bring your portfolio or laptop and show them a slideshow of your work. Find out what they want out of using your services and make them feel comfortable.

From there, recommend shooting on location somewhere or market yourself so you do more lifestyle / photojournalistic / controlled candid photos let nature be your backdrop and the sun your light...

There is something to say about owning your own studio however...

Home studios business means you essentially always have something to do or can do ( at least thats how I feel ).
You will have to spend extra cash for getting furniture and remodeling aspects of the house for people to meet in. The plus size is that the 999" (joking) flat panel plasma TV is a tax write off for showing slideshows to your clients or even the big projector!

An actual studio space is quite different. It really says a lot to client's that you are THAT serious (in a world of home studios).You go there, show up and do your 9-5 there know when to quit... You are established enough in the client's eyes that you won't close up or take their cash in a quick scam.

Their are plus and minuses to the whole thing. I am taking the cheaper route because I didn't feel like taking out a loan. All my equipment was paid off through my photography in one way or another. I am at the point where my profits need to be the most they can be(while not over selling myself or my work) so I can one day, get myself a studio of my own and quite the day job of being a programmer to do what I am passionate about...

6/27/2007 11:51:52 AM

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Photography Question 
Andrei Dan Crisan

member since: 2/4/2007
  95 .  Flash Photography: Distance to Subject?
I've had a few headaches with making pictures using the flash. Are there any minimal distances for the use of flash? Thank you.

5/7/2007 1:10:51 PM

Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/18/2000
  Yes, auto-flash exposure is limited by both a minimum and a maximum flash-to-subject distance. The limits are dependent on the ISO and lens aperture settings and the maximum power of the flash. What camera, flash, and settings are you using?

5/7/2007 1:59:39 PM

Alan N. Marcus

member since: 3/4/2006
  Your question is phrased too vague for us to be of much help. I will assume you are having problems taking close-up pictures with a digital with built-in flash.

Consider that at distances closer than 2 feet (0.6m) a high percentage of your shots will be overexposed. This is true because light from the flash at extremely close distances is too bright. You are advised to reduce the flash power by simply covering the flash lens with white transparent material such as a handkerchief folded so the light must transverse several layers of cloth. You can experiment using other translucent objects. Best is a piece of white opal glass or plastic. You can find such objects around the house. I sometimes use a plastic placemat Better yet, at the hardware store buy opal white plastic material normally used as cover lens on florescent light fixtures. You can find all manor of ceiling fixture opal glass at lighting fixture shop or go to a glass shop will have opal window glass cut to order. Use your imagination, you can do this.

Alan Marcus

5/7/2007 10:29:32 PM

Diane Dupuis-Kallos
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 12/27/2003
  Try reading the manual that came with your camera.

5/8/2007 3:31:26 AM

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Photography Question 
aileen cockburn

member since: 7/23/2002
  96 .  Mother's Day: Better Photos of Kids & Teens
What props - if any - would you use for 3 girls ages 16, 15 and 12? Thanks!

5/5/2007 2:03:05 PM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
  Have them come in their favorite outfits.

5/5/2007 9:08:35 PM

  That age group makes me think of make-up, lipstick, etc. Also you might try hats. Are you going to shoot them together or individually?

5/6/2007 4:01:11 AM

aileen cockburn

member since: 7/23/2002
  Hi: Thanks for the response. WS, I have told them to bring clothes that they want to wear and they can change as many times as they want. Carolynm I love the hat idea - I never thought of that. I will also tell them to bring lipstick, etc. I plan to do them in groups and also separately. Thanks again!

5/6/2007 11:33:25 AM

Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/4/2004
 
 
  GRANDPA AND ME
GRANDPA AND ME
FUJI S2 /200/f22 3 light system
untouched- SHOT IN A BLACK BOX I MADE-GREAT GRANDPA SHARES HIS BIRTHDAY WITH VETERNS DAY-THIS IS HIS WWII UNIFORM-AND PITURES OF HIM GOING IN AS A KID-COMING OUT AS A OLDER MAN.
 
 
Aileen,
Wicker chairs are great, and stools of course. A mirror effect is always a WOW shot! Pose the oldest with two youngest in mirror or youngest playing with make-up and pearls, etc., with older girls behind with "Oh NO" faces or a bit angry expressions - like they just caught her in their stuff. Mom, will love them!
Debby

5/7/2007 6:14:34 AM

aileen cockburn

member since: 7/23/2002
  Thanks debby great idea I will give it ago can I ask a silly question how do I focas the shot is it mainly on the mirror or the person or can I manage to get it all in focus. I think I will practice with my daughter first to make sure I can do it.
Aileen

5/7/2007 9:39:07 AM

Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/4/2004
  You focus on the Mirror.

5/7/2007 11:20:38 AM

aileen cockburn

member since: 7/23/2002
  thanks debby I will give it ago and let you see the results if that ok
Aileen

5/7/2007 12:39:49 PM

Melinda Hambrick
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 11/19/2005
  I have taught all three age groups in school, and I have a thought to share. I think there is the potential that a twelve year old will resent being posed as if make-up and all are too grown up for her. Believe it or not, many of them wear it regularly. I would ask the girls how they feel about that idea beforehand, and see if it's a fit for their personalities. It may be, and they may love the idea. But if I were doing the shoot, I'd go for something more natural and casual - have them wear jeans and white shirts, and group them together outside in a really pretty spot. Much like I would for three adult sisters. It will draw the focus to their similar features, and the bond they share, and will be a more "timeless" shot in the long run. Teenage girls are young women, and want to feel as adult as possible, and the hat and make-up thing just makes me think of 5 year olds playing dress up. Go for a shot that puts them on equal footing and highlights their lifelong bond as sisters.

Just my thoughts... hope they help.

Melinda

5/8/2007 6:46:36 AM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
"Teenage girls are young women, and want to feel as adult as possible, and the hat and make-up thing just makes me think of 5 year olds playing dress up."

Isn't that what ALL women of ALL ages LOVE to do all their lives long: playing dress up.....?

5/8/2007 6:55:59 AM

Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/4/2004
 
 
 
really!
I agree, I do this all day every day and have not found to upsat a kid yet.
and a great sitting should have all of these not just a single shot series.
The more you provide the happier mom will be.
And if I am still correct no matter the age, Mom brings them in and Pays for it ,because SHE wants portraits.
I know with my Teenage boys, I make them, 16 & 15 or not,lol.

5/8/2007 7:40:34 AM

Anne Harb Photography
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/23/2006
  I agree, girls wanta have fun! Here are some more ideas...Cell phones & laptops, and funky patterned pillows,a bed! Bedroom stuff, lamps, old bears..a table full of cookie baking stuff and bring it outdoors! Go to get ice cream, coffee or big giant cookies.
Lots art supplies spread all over the place or go outdoors with an easel with some past piece of art on display and one girl pretending to paint/draw...Shoes,shoes, & more shoes... favorite books and if they own a series like Harry Potter..stack them up to sit on, flowers...picking or smelling even just standing in a row showing the size of each child with simular flowers draped across arms.

5/8/2007 10:31:21 AM

Mary E. Heinz
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/23/2005
  First, I think you have an awesome opportunity to do the photography with
all three....I did some teens recently and they were so much fun....I took them outside and used my backdrop ...
I had to "hang" it from the side of my explorer and then out on the grass/ it worked...or taped it to the brick building nearby....

Now,,,I even took a magazine and had
them "read"...etc....

samples...at http://www.pics-ties.com
under TEEN gallery 2007

I love candid photos...and you can
"set" up candids...ex. in my gallery
above...

When I read this I thought about some
really neat Senior shots I've seen/
on location...wading in the water, etc.

Good luck/ let us see what you get !
I did 2 girls and a boy/ sister/ brother/ and cousin.

5/8/2007 12:28:27 PM

Mary E. Heinz
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/23/2005
  I would just do at least a set/ try to
get them enjoying themselves together/
like I said, candids...those are the
most "expressive" to me. Find out what
THEY enjoy doing.

5/8/2007 12:31:28 PM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
Hi Mary,

"candids" are photos of subjects who are NOT aware that they are being photographed. The photos you describe, however, are set up, directed photos, where the subjects are very MUCH aware that they are being photographed.
Your descriptions paint "Life magazine cover" style photos, so they can be great.
But "candid" they are NOT.

Have fun!

5/8/2007 4:12:45 PM

  Hi Aileen,

http://supermodels.com/profile.php?id=17776

You might look at this portfolio online. It of a young lady Keshia (age 12) that I shoot on occassion. It has different works by different photographers in the portfolio. Click on view photos.

You can also click through on the site to her One Model Place site. Click on the portrait with her name on it by Bruce Smith.

There are all different kind of ideas in the two portfolios that can be obtained by looking at them for shooting teens.

Kerby

5/8/2007 5:53:58 PM

Betty L. Saunders

member since: 3/13/2007
  Aileen,
Have the teens bring some of their favorite music CDs that they can play and hear on your CD player. This puts them at ease and releases their shy-before-the-camera attitude. Helps them move a bit, too!
Betty

5/9/2007 7:00:49 PM

Denise A. Zabor

member since: 4/30/2007
  For little girls you can use teddy bears or other stuffed animals, hats, flower bouquet, a single rose, white lacy parasol umbrellas like you would use at a wedding shower, ballons,large plastic crayon banks you can find at most dollar stores. For the older girls teddybears hats and flowers still apply. China town sells beautiful Chineese umbrellas with colorful designs that make beautiful backdrops, pillows, colored tulle to create a draped effect, cardboard stars painted with silver metalic paint. The list goes on.

5/11/2007 9:01:22 AM

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Photography Question 
Heather 

member since: 11/23/2006
  97 .  Portrait Photography: Tips on Posing
Hey, I was wondering how to pose for portrait photos? I would love to learn some different ways! So if anyone has any ideas, please let me know. Also, what are some ideas for props? Thanks.

4/27/2007 8:34:06 PM

Heather 

member since: 11/23/2006
  Also, what are some ideas for props?

4/27/2007 9:24:43 PM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
Try some photo portrait magazines, Heather.

4/28/2007 3:58:12 AM

  Hi Heather,
Good question! Photo magazines are always excellent resources for studying different types of photography. Here at BetterPhoto, there are many options: Check BP's contest finalists for outstanding pics in a number of categories, including People. For portrait shots you particularly admire, simply click on the photographer's gallery to see more images!

In addition, we have an excellent 4-week online course on the subject: Posing and Portraiture Techniques with Ibarionex Perello Plus, you'll find some great ideas in Ibarionex's BP article: Portrait Photography: Lighting and Background

Hope this helps!
Kerry

4/30/2007 10:08:15 AM

Who Me? 
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/19/2007
  try practicing in front of the mirror.

Keep it bright.

4/30/2007 11:32:16 PM

Marius Liebenberg
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 11/21/2005
  Our photography club has portrait nights with studio lights and strobes for the members to use and volunteer models come along to pose and in return they get free photos. I have found that to be a good way of getting experience in posing techniques and communicating with the model which is essential for good photos. Some models are natural at it and some not.

5/1/2007 2:02:32 AM

Who Me? 
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/19/2007
  don't be a poser

5/1/2007 3:45:07 AM

Catherine Johns

member since: 6/22/2004
  Hello Healther,

Don't laugh, but I watch America's Next Top Model.

The photos are incredible and I find the suggestions that are given to the models help me guide people into posing who dont' know how to pose. Plus I learn from the novice model's common mistakes. I've also learned which poses are better depending on the model's facial features and structure.

If you are looking for unique poses, I get a lot of ideas from this show.

Cathy Johns

5/1/2007 5:46:42 AM

Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/4/2004
  Hi Heather,
you can also learn alot on the Studio Photography Threads.
from Babies to Seniors
here is The link to thread #1 there are 23 of them:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/QnAdetail.asp?threadID=17534

I do hope this helps,
Debby Tabb

5/1/2007 8:14:06 AM

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Photography Question 
Heather 

member since: 11/23/2006
  98 .  Make Your Own Backdrop or Background Stand
I was wondering: Has anyone tried making their own background stand or backdrop? If so, how did they turn out? I want to make both a backdrop and a background stand, but I'm on a budget! Plus, I'm a beginner ... so if anyone has any info, please let me know. Thanks!

4/24/2007 5:57:08 PM

Sobia Chishti
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/13/2002
  Hi Heather,
To make your own backdrops, please go to this BetterPhoto link. I've found the article very helpful and, in fact, have made two of my own backdrops: How to Make Your Own Backdrop
For the background stand, a couple of years ago, my husband made a stand for me from PVC pipes. You can find it in any home improvement store. You can get the pipes in any length and than join them with the joints available in the same aisle. Once the background and the stand is done, you can clip or pin up the background with the stand or you can sew a sleeve in one end of the backdrop and use it to put your pipe in it. I've found the PVC pipes flimsy, though.
Another thing that I did was to hammer two nails in the wall of my garage since that was my first trial studio, and I fastened a rope from one nail to another. I then attached my backdrop with cloth pins. If you find nails and rope ugly, think of putting up a curtain rod, but it will cost you more than mere rope and nails.
You can start with these or you may want to think about spending $100 on the background stand. I hope it helps.

4/24/2007 6:28:43 PM

Ashley 

member since: 7/12/2004
  I recently received two homemade backdrop stands, both made out of PVC pipe. One was all solid but the other was split into 2 foot sections so that I could make it different heights and witdths. If there is someonwhere I can post pictures, I can try to do that. I love how they turned out.

To make the base, you take a 2 T splitters. You would just need 4 short pieces of PVC pipe to put in the T splitters to make it stand. Then how ever tall you want it. Elbow a the top and another piece across. On the top piece, I have curtin rings to hold my backdrops.

Like I said, you could make it as fancy or simple as you want. :) I love mine!

5/1/2007 12:33:27 PM

Jo Jones

member since: 9/19/2005
  I too have one made with PVC. I use 1/2" conduit for my rods to hang the backdrops on. I made the stand so the pole was about 4 ft long with another pole that slid down the center with a hole drilled though the top of the outside section and holes at different levels on the inside sections so it is adjustable for different heights. I use a pin that I got at the hardware store that has a wire hook attached to secure it so the pin can't slip out of the hole. I have a T that slips over the top of the pole, with 2 elbows that stick up. This allows me to hang about 4 backdrops and easily just drop one to the floor to use the next one. It works great and is easy to transport.

Good luck!

5/1/2007 12:59:50 PM

Alan N. Marcus

member since: 3/4/2006
  All sound advice and deserves a tip of the hat. Consider fiber glass curtin materila at the Home Improvement store. This is fireproof and a good choice if hot lights are employed.

Alan Marcus
ammarcus@earthlink.net

5/1/2007 1:25:22 PM

Shirley Fairley

member since: 3/18/2005
  You can use two lightstands, a pice of wood dowling from the local hardware store and some clamps. The good thing about this is you can use the lightstands for their appropriate use too!
Shirley

5/1/2007 2:18:30 PM

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Photography Question 
Girish Vaghela
BetterPhoto Member
Contact Girish
Girish's Gallery

member since: 4/29/2005
  99 .  High Key Photography
What is a "High Key" image?

4/10/2007 3:17:12 PM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
  That's an image with lots and lots of light. Often the "color" white dominates in those images.

4/10/2007 3:53:02 PM

Michael A. Bielat
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/23/2007
  Think model head shots: Clean, white and not a lot (if any) shadows.

4/10/2007 8:51:27 PM

Alan N. Marcus

member since: 3/4/2006
  Hi Girish,
High Key:
A style whereby the resulting image is comprised mainly of white and near-white tones. Mid-range tones are permissible but the scene is devoid of black and near-black tones. Lighting and background set the mood, which is light and airy. It works best if the subject is light-toned as well. Thus, the background is pure or nearly pure white. The set-up requires more light on the background than on the subject. The background is generally quite evenly illuminated, and the background light is set to illuminate with twice or better the intensity as compared to the strength of the main at the subject plane.
The final image consists mainly of white and light gray tones. Some shadows are required, or else depth perception is lost. To achieve, shadows are well filled by a lamp positioned close to the camera lens. This fill lamp is adjusted so light energy from it arrives at the subject plane at 1/2 the brilliance produced by the main light. This achieves a 3:1 lighting ratio, which is the maximum ratio that retains the high-key effect. Additionally the high-key effect is best achieved by positioning the main light near to and above the camera (frontal lighting).
If the lighting is flat 2:1 ratio, shadows are too well filled and depth perception is lost. If the fill and main arrive at the subject plane with the same brilliance, the result is a 2:1 ratio.

Alan Marcus

4/10/2007 11:08:31 PM

  Thank you W. S., Michael, and Alan.
Do you have examples where I can look?

4/11/2007 6:28:08 AM

W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
 
  HKNP
HKNP
 
 

Norman Phillips wrote a book about it, Girish. But there are dozens more.

4/11/2007 6:39:05 AM

Who Me? 
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/19/2007
  opposite of "low key"

4/11/2007 8:09:40 AM

dennis w. mcclain

member since: 8/2/2004
  i have a really thin while muslin backdrop. I place my strobe behind the backdrop, directly behind the subject, and aim it back towards the camera. you have to play with the intensity. I use my 430ex and a gf lightsphere, for fill lighting. makes for a pretty cool effect, and no shadows behind the subject.

4/14/2007 1:18:27 PM

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Photography Question 
Khurram Khalid

member since: 4/5/2007
  100 .  Products Shooting?
I'm new in photography and looking for help about product shooting for printing catalogue and Web sites. The products I want to shoot are medical/surgical instruments made of stainless steel, soccer balls, leather garments, leather and textile gloves, etc. I have a Nikon D80 with 18mm-135mm AF-S Dx Lens. what other accessories do I need for setting up a small studio?

4/5/2007 2:33:01 PM

  Hi Khurram,
You need lights, preferably strobes. A couple of strobes with about 300 watt-seconds would probably do. You should also build a couple of light panels or buy them. There is an article here about making Light Panels, the article under Resources. The tripod is also very important; Manfrotto makes some very good ones. You may want a lighting tent, but I usually get along without one.
Thanks,
John

4/5/2007 4:08:00 PM

Khurram Khalid

member since: 4/5/2007
  Hi,
Thank you, John, for your advice. Please suggest any online tutorial for my specific photo shooting requirements. I mean how to manage aperture/lighting/shutter speed, etc., for still products shooting. Thanks!

4/5/2007 4:43:24 PM

  Hi Khurram,
I teach an online course right here at BetterPhoto: Introduction to Product Photography. If you are interested, you can still join the current session.
Thanks,
John Siskin

4/5/2007 6:32:07 PM

Khurram Khalid

member since: 4/5/2007
  Hi,

could you please tell me detail outline of this course and also could you provide any visuals in you course

4/7/2007 10:03:03 AM

  www.betterphoto.com/courseOverview.asp?cspID=69

Or, go to the "courses" button at the top of this page, select "4 week", you'll find it in there... :-)

Bob

4/7/2007 10:41:39 AM

  Thanks Bob. That's were all the details are! John Siskin

4/7/2007 11:15:20 AM

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