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Photography QnA: New Questions

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Category: New Questions

In the BetterPhoto photography forum, great questions on the art and craft of photography flow in at a rapid, non-stop rate. The following are the photography questions that have been asked most recently. Browse the questions below to see which photo topics have most recently been posted in our photography forum.

Page 3211 : 32101 -32110 of 32364 questions

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Photography Question 
Fred G. Pitcher

member since: 4/18/2002
  32101 .  windows 95
Can I get by with usng Windows 95 with a Sony Mavica MVC-200 digital camera

Thanks

4/18/2002 1:24:24 PM

Robert 

member since: 12/8/2002
  You could, but it will prob get painful. Win95 isn't really set up to handle USB (despite MS's claims), is much more unstable that 98,2k, almost anything else. I've also seen it do some strange thing with the serial ports.

R.Lee

12/8/2002 5:49:55 PM

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Photography Question 
Sandy Miles

member since: 4/17/2002
  32102 .  using add-on lenses
I just purchased some add-on lenses for my Kodak DX3500,a close up and a wide angle.
I'd like more information on when and how to use them for better pictures

4/17/2002 1:08:05 PM

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Photography Question 
Fiona 

member since: 4/24/2001
  32103 .  How to shoot Lightening
On several occasions, I have attempted to 'expand my horizons' by shooting a lightening storm at night (and very unsuccesfully). I have the Nikon N90s with a 24-120mm and a 20-300mm zoom lens.I have tried using both. I set the camera to infinity and use the bulb setting but I just cannot get the camera to focus, should I be on manual focus or automatic? Is there some *magic* to getting this technique right?Is there a better lens to use and what's the fastest film recommended for this type of shot. What should I do to try this again? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Fiona

4/17/2002 10:27:31 AM

Ken Pang

member since: 7/8/2000
  Hi Fiona,

Try two things: A wider field of view, say 50mm, and a smaller aperture, say f/16.

This gives you a couple advantages:

1) More chance of catching a lightning strike, if you're wathcing more of the sky

2) An opportunity to hold the shutter open longer, since a smaller aperture means a longer time to correct exposure

3) sharper focus, because at 50mm and f/16, everything beyond 4m is "acceptably sharp" according to the depth of field calculator. Of course, if lighting strikes within 4m of you, you got bigger problems than unsharp focus.

Remember to use a tripod, use mirror lock up if you can, and use a remote to trigger the camera, so you don't send it shaking when you hit the shutter trigger.

4/19/2002 10:39:47 PM

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Photography Question 
John Swanson

member since: 7/15/2001
  32104 .  Darkroom Techniques - Dodging and Burning
I see on various Web sites terms such as dodging and burning. I'd like to know what these terms mean, and any further information on what a professional lab can do when I order an enlargement or have film developed. When I have my 120 film done, I get a contact sheet back. Can I indicate cropping on these? If so, how should I do it? Are there any books for beginners which discuss developing/printing options?

4/17/2002 9:20:04 AM

Jeff S. Kennedy

member since: 3/4/2002
  Dodging is the technique of holding back light from a specific area of your print. It is done to lighten up an area. Burning is just the opposite. In this case you are giving an area more exposure to darken it. A washed out sky for example can be burned to bring out detail.

Different labs may have different procedures for indicating custom cropping and manipulation. Check with your lab for their preferences. You should just be able to draw crop marks on your contact sheet. You can also indicate areas to dodge or burn. Your lab will probably have specific symbols for each or these actions that they prefer to use to avoid confusion.

4/17/2002 12:06:02 PM

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Photography Question 
Vee Rooney

member since: 4/17/2002
  32105 .  Teleconverter
I can't to afford to buy a 400mm lens and I shoot a lot of film on sporting events, especially baseball. Is there a compatible telecoverter for a Tamron 28-300mm f/3/5-6/3 ld aspherical with an Elan 7? (Would prefer a 1.4) - Two self-proclaimed camera experts told me I'm out of luck...can't be. Help...
Thanks!!!

4/17/2002 12:24:46 AM

Ken Pang

member since: 7/8/2000
  Vee, You're out of luck.

Even if you could find a compatible teleconverter, the effective aperture would be too low to autofocus. A 1.4 would stop you down one stop, giving you an effective aperture of about f/9.

A lens like that would be near impossible to hand hold, and would need a shutter speed to slow to capture fast moving objects.

Sorry buddy, your camera expert friends are right.

4/19/2002 10:34:37 PM

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Photography Question 
Ron Hayter

member since: 4/16/2002
  32106 .  Shooting Daylight Interiors
I want to shoot interiors. I've used hot lights,(too direct); monolights at night, (too many dark corners, and dark windows); monolights--daytime, still dark corners with blown out windows or no flash--available light with sun shadows and yellow walls. If I filter out the incandescent light then the daylight will be too blue. What is the secret mixture of light to get this image?

4/16/2002 11:14:49 PM

Colin Bell

member since: 2/6/2001
  Hi Ron,
The best and easiest way I have found is to use a tripod with a dedicated flash unit. Using ambient light, exposure compensation, and second curtain shutter sync set on the flash. It sounds like a lot, but it is easy in practice.

Set the camera on the tripod, Use the aperture-priority mode on your camera, set the aperture for a good depth of field, ( F16 ), and take an ambient light reading of the room. With the camera, or a light meter. Add two stops of exposure compensation, switch on the second curtain shutter sync on the flash unit, and take the picture.

The two stops of exposure compensation stops the light from the windows over exposing the shot, the second curtain shutter sync allows the camera to capture the ambient light in the room first, before the flash goes off.

If there are no windows in the room, you won’t need the second curtain shutter sync. You might have to experiment with the amount of exposure compensation you use, in Australia where I’m from, it is almost always two stops, but our light is very intense. I do bracket down if there is not much light entering the windows. I might use one or one and one half stops of exposure compensation.

Well I hope I have helped you.
Good luck,
Colin B

4/17/2002 11:44:17 PM

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Photography Question 
Richard Jackson
BetterPhoto Member
Contact Richard
Richard's Gallery

member since: 6/8/2000
  32107 .  Type of Nikon lens!
I own a Nikon 6006, and I have a Sigma 28-200/3.5D lens to go with it. I notice that in the photo mags they list an AI-S lens. Can someone give me a discription of what this is. Thanks!

4/16/2002 6:54:26 PM

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Photography Question 
Lisa M. Brewer

member since: 4/16/2002
  32108 .  Capturing Motion of People
I am trying to capture kicks and punches being thrown during my child's karate lessons. Everytime I snap the button, the action is over before it registers the motion. What do I need to do to get the action wanted?

4/16/2002 1:22:50 AM

Jeff S. Kennedy

member since: 3/4/2002
  Sounds like a big part of your problem is timing. Good sports photographers know the sport they are shooting and learn to anticipate peak moments. I suspect you are using a digital camera and can't capture several frames in a row. If you are using a film camera with a motor drive (or a higher end digi cam) then try to fire just before the punch is thrown and let the motor drive fire off a few more frames until the completion of the punch.

4/16/2002 12:44:32 PM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  There's a low-tech possibility for you, If you don't mind buying still another camera. You want to be able to see the action while you are taking the picture.

Almost forgotten are the little rangefinder-type 35's from the 60's-70's. A Konica S3, Canonet QL 19GIII, Olympus 35 RC or Minolta Hi-Matic 7SII can be had for two figures on ebay. You can see the action through the viewfinder while you shoot, with no SLR mirror-slap blackout.

Shutter action is instantaneous. You set a 1/250 shutter speed and the camera automatically sets your aperture. The flash will work at any shutter speed, since it's a leaf-type shutter in the lens. A further bonus is that the lenses in these guys are as good as state-of-the-art lenses today. The camera industry wants us to forget that they made better stuff 30 years ago.

Only one caution: they all used the 1.3 volt mercury battery that's harder to get today. A serious camera store will sell you a Wein battery for these.

They don't have built-in flashes. Just as well, because you'll need a strong one if you're shooting inside.

If you get one of these beauties, see if it isn't the best camera you've ever owned.

Everything good does have a catch, though. The one here is that you focus these cameras yourself. In a sports situation, you focus on your little guy, or, if he's moving toward or away, pre-focus on where he's going to be.

There's no zoom lens. The lens is a 38 or 40 semi-wide angle, so you have to be fairly close.

4/16/2002 2:01:03 PM

John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/27/2001
  Several good suggestions thus far.

I disagree though with running a digital or film camera in "continuous" or "sequence" mode. This does not work that well. With a film camera it burns film very rapidly and with a digital it eats the memory equally fast, if not faster. 4-5 frames at a whack swallows an entire 36-exp roll with 7-9 sequence shots.

The pro photographers who use this method (not that many do), use a top-end pro camera body set up with a special 250 frame film back, and bulk load their film in a dark-room from 100 foot reels of film. Their top-end pro motor drives (not built in to the camera) run 10 frames per second, versus the typical 3-5 frames per second found on most consumer 35mm SLR's, or 0.2-0.3 seconds between frames. That's a lot of time between frames when shooting fast action, and a lot can happen *between* frames.

Sports and racing photographers did extremely well before motor drives and 250 frame bulk loaded film backs. Their secret was timing. They became very familiar with the type of action they were photographing and would watch for cues that occur just before some action of interest does. In boxing, they often watched the boxers' feet, which would become firmly planted just before making a decisively hard punch. There are probably similar "cues" and "tells" in karate that a close observer can watch for.

To catch the action when it happens requires anticipation of it and timing shutter release *before* it occurs. An SLR does not react instantaneously, even a manual focus one. The lens must stop down and mirror flip up before the shutter can travel. Autofocus SLR's and Point&Shoots have an even longer delay to allow the auto-focus system to set lens focus before lens stop-down and mirror travel.

I recommend watching several matches very closely, without the camera. Look at feet, knees, waists and shoulders, and try correlating their position and movement with kicks and punches that follow. With a little observation you should be able to see some patterns that predict kicks and punches just before they happen. Then practice a few times using these cues for timing a slight lead in your shutter release. Knowing you need a slight lead is half the battle. Knowing the cues and some practice is the other half. Most find the skill is not that difficult to learn and after a while it becomes automatic.

I sometimes use a motor winder when photographing fast action, but it's *always* on single-shot mode. It's used to automatically wind on to the next frame without having to do it manually, and allows better concentration on the action. However, it's not an essential device for me, only a convenience.

-- John

4/16/2002 10:05:04 PM

Lisa M. Brewer

member since: 4/16/2002
  I am totally thankful for all the responses that I have gotten for my question, but... the responses seem to be geared to regular cameras, and I am using a Olympus Camedia C-3020 Zoom digital camera. I just need to know what the setting should be, and in what menu category, in order to capture the movement in mid-form. I should have been more specific in my question, and for that I apologize. It is my first time ever using such a site on the internet. I again apologize, and will appreciate any response now given.

4/18/2002 4:09:21 AM

doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com

member since: 6/14/2001
  You're not gonna like this, Lisa, but you may be asking a digicam to do the impossible. Every one I've ever used has a lag time between the instant you press the shutter and when the actual exposure is made. You will get lucky sometimes and anticipate the action just right. In general, you must use a fast shutter speed. Your Camedia, which I understand to be a decent digicam, must have an action mode or they may actually call it a shutter. Anyone out there have one of these?

4/18/2002 7:49:51 AM

John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/27/2001
  Lisa,
Even a digital has a slight delay between the time you push the shutter release button and when the image is actually "recorded."

I was not clear on this in my first posting. There is more lag than just the camera's; there is your reaction time also. If you wait until you see what you want in the viewfinder, it's too late, even if the camera could react instantaneously. It's why I recommended observing closely to learn how to anticipate when things will happen before they do, and then practicing at the timing. In making action photographs I had to learn how to react a split-second just before the "decisive moment" and press the shutter release then. It's one of the reasons Doug mentioned the old rangefinder cameras as you can see it occur, hear the shutter travel simultaneously and know if you got the shot. With an SLR, I know if I *see* the decisive moment through the viewfinder I *know* I didn't get it as it's blacked out with the mirror up while the shutter is traveling.

-- John

4/19/2002 11:48:41 PM

  Hi, Lisa,

I use an Olympus C-3020Z, too. I haven't yet done a whole lot of action shots, but I've done enough of them to experience the frustration caused by the shutter lag problem. I think that one part good timing, one part good anticipation, and several parts good luck are what we need to take good action shots with cameras like the C-3020Z. As for the settings, I find the Sports setting in the Scene mode is good is there's quite a bit of light available. Program also seems to work reasonably well with good light, but works best, for me anyway, with relatively close subjects. I'm sorry I can't be more help, but I'm still quite new to action shots.

4/27/2002 3:45:25 AM

Eddie King

member since: 4/21/2002
  Hi Lisa. I have been trying to get action shots with my Olympus digital too. I have the most success with the settings on manual focus and aperture priority set to allow for the fastest shutter speed possible (you have to experiment before the shot in whatever light you are in). If you are close enough to use flash, even better. These settings seem to decrease the camera's response time versus auto focus and program mode. Of course it's vital to anticipate the action, pre-focus, and take a lot of shots. I enjoyed reading the replies to your question.

4/27/2002 7:07:16 AM

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Photography Question 
Aruna  

member since: 2/3/2002
  32109 .  Camera accessories price list
Where can I find the prize list for all the camera accessories specifically
for filters and filter hood/holder.
I need the information quite urgently.

Thanx in advance,
Aruna

4/16/2002 12:32:07 AM

Jeff S. Kennedy

member since: 3/4/2002
  Have you checked B&H online?

4/16/2002 12:45:15 PM

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Photography Question 
Patrick A. Hunton

member since: 4/15/2002
  32110 .  How to shoot a band at a concert?
How do you shoot a band at a concert with low lighting? If you leave the shutter open longer the images tend to be blurry if the band moves around alot. So, how on earth do you get good pictures of bands in low light situations when the are rocking the house???

4/16/2002 12:01:50 AM

Jeff S. Kennedy

member since: 3/4/2002
  Fast lens, fast film, monopod if you can, and don't be afraid of motion blur. It can look pretty cool. Otherwise, wait for a relatively still moment to shoot.

4/16/2002 12:46:48 PM

Colin Bell

member since: 2/6/2001
 
 
  Brozman
Brozman
Slow Shutter Speed
 
  Dutch T
Dutch T
With F4, 300mm Lens
 
  Finnen
Finnen
No Flash Blues
 
  Pete
Pete
Pushed 1600 t0 3200
 
  Zydeco
Zydeco
Pushed colour film
 
 
Hi Patrick
I do a lot of Low light work with live bands. If you use professional film and “Push” the film, you can get excellent results. If you do not know about “Pushing and Pulling” film, I’m sure there is a detailed section on this website that explains it.

Basically, you expose the film you have at a different film speed than it is rated for. Example: you used 1600 speed colour film. You would rate it at 3200 (or 6400 depending on the film) and when you are getting it processed - go to a professional lab - and tell them that it was pushed to 3200. They then process that type of film at 3200.

That’s “Pushing”, it increases the amount of light that gets to the film. That way you can use the available natural light. This will add atmosphere to your photos. Pushing can increase the grain in your photos, but with modern film it isn’t as bad (or good) as it used to be and in some cases there is no grain at all.
When you are taking an available light picture, expose it to the lightest part of the scene. This will generally be the face. I shall include some of my pictures as examples.

You can find out how much a film can be pushed or pulled by reading the manufacturer’s instructions. They are usually on the inside of the film box. Manufacturer’s website’s are also good sources.

I usually go to a job with four or five different types of professional film, to cover all the different shots that I am after.

I use Fuji colour films and push them as far as they can go for available low light shots. I use Fuji rated at normal or just above for straight flash shots and also for available light and second curtain sync shots (a bit of movement in the picture).
For B&W, I use Ilford Delta 3200 (at 6400 it can go to 25000) and develop it in Ilford Ilfotec DD-X. This combination of film and developer is brilliant for there is basically no grain. I use T-Max 400 when there is a lot of light.

Well, I hope I have been of some help to you. The best advice that I can give you is take more pictures and don’t be afraid to experiment.

Regards,
Colin Bell

4/19/2002 12:40:43 PM

Patrick A. Hunton

member since: 4/15/2002
  Wow... thanks for all that info... right now I don't know CRUD about photography! All my experience is rested in Digital on a Sony Cybershot... and now i'm making the move to a 35mm SLR and i'm even taking one of the workshops for beginners on this site! But I appreciate all your information! I've heard about using 2nd Curtain Syncing or whatever, and am really intrigued by that too, but I think i'll wait till I know some more, and maybe get some better equipment! Thanks again!

4/19/2002 3:41:11 PM

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