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Autumn Abstract

  Autumn Abstract
Autumn Abstract
© Brenda Tharp
Canon EOS 1N 35mm ...
 
 
 
GRNsiva      This is really extraordinary.


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1/2/2004 4:57:43 AM

 
Brenda Tharp
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/9/2003
 

Thanks so much!


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1/2/2004 10:02:19 PM

 
Jim Miotke
BetterPhoto Member
BetterPhotoJim.com
Owner, BetterPhoto.com, Inc.
 

Yes, I agree. I find your water and reflection abstracts very appealing. Can you tell us... do you look for anything in particular when shooting this kind of photo? Do you use a particular lens and/or filter? And how about a tripod with such "soft" subject matter... is it still a good idea?


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1/5/2004 11:45:51 PM

 
Brenda Tharp
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/9/2003
 

Thanks, Jim! I do look for strong colors in my watery abstracts, and complimentary or contrasting colors, too. One of the things that makes images like this example work is to wait for light wind to ripple the surface. I was going for theh stain-glass effect, and it's really a matter of experimenting to get the one you like! I usually use an 80-200mm lens, so I can pick out the section of the reflection that I want, but other lenses can work, too. I have some where I even used a 300mm lens, and others where my 28-135mm lens did the job. As to filters, I often use a warming filter (81B to warm up the colors, but each situation requires a decision. A polarizer can eliminate the reflections so you have to look through it and see if it helps or not. Sometimes it can be a benefit.! One key thing in getting the reflection is to have the surface of the water in shade, but the objects reflecting in the water in sunlight. And tripods are a requirement - because you need as much depth of field as possible to get the reflecting objects to be sharp. I was set around f/16 at 1/60 for this image above. Even with moving water images, you don't want camera shake. Your shutter speeds are often around 1/4 to 2 seconds long to capture the blur of moving water. Hope this all helps! Brenda


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1/6/2004 8:58:56 PM

 
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