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Mr. Happy Meets Ernest Withers
  Mr. Happy Meets Ernest Withers
Mr. Happy Meets Ernest Withers
Ernest Withers was born in Memphis Tennesse to a postal worker father and exhibited interest in photography. His images captured America for nearly 60 years, preserving the good and the bad, in particular, racism. He traveled with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during his public life. Withers' coverage of the Emmett Till murder trial brought national attention to the racial violence taking place during the l950s in Mississippi, among other places. He died October 15, 2007 at age 85. Notice his headstone is shiny black and shaped like a camera.
© Joyce S. Court
Canon EOS 40D Digi...
 
 
 
Wm Nosal
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    Great Spot For Mr Happy To Visit
Cool Shot, Joyce!

11/27/2011 3:23:09 PM

 
Karen Kessler
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member since: 7/10/2008
 

How cool is this! Which cemetary is Mr. Withers buried in? I don't recognize it.

11/28/2011 8:23:27 PM

 
Joyce S. Court
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Mr. Happy was reluctant to enter the cemetery but I assured him that it would be well worth his time and, of course, as you can see he was quite impressed with Mr. Withers.

Elmwood is a historic cemetery with available lots that provides a beautiful final resting place to families as it shares its history, art and nature with the community; this is our mission statement.
Fifty Memphis gentlemen committed $500 each to purchase land and establish a new cemetery 2.5 miles from town in 1852. Originally consisting of 40 acres, it was expanded after the Civil War to 80 acres.

In the 1870s the original corporation was dissolved and Elmwood became one of the oldest nonprofits in Tennessee. Since then, Elmwood Cemetery has become the final resting place to over 75,000 inhabitants including mayors, governors, madams, blues singers, suffragists, martyrs, generals, civil rights leaders, holy men and women, outlaws and millionaires.

Elmwood was established as part of the Rural Cemetery Movement which swept the nation in the early to mid 1800s. It is a classic example of a garden cemetery with its park-like setting, sweeping vistas, shady knolls, large stands of ancient trees, and magnificent monuments.

During the Victorian Era, the popular view of death became romanticized; death was now represented by symbols including angels, flowers, and plants. These ideas are reflected in the many magnificent monuments, mausoleums and life-sized figures.

Elmwood is the final resting place of those who created Memphis history and has emerged today as Memphis' finest and oldest active cemetery.

The grounds of Elmwood Cemetery were entered on the National Register of Historic Places as project number #02000233 on March 20, 2002.

12/1/2011 5:14:57 AM

 
Lisa J. Boulden
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Such an appropriate spot to visit.
Mr. Happy is certainly a well-travelled little fella!
Wonderful image and narrative, Joyce!
~♥~Lisa

12/2/2011 10:55:59 AM

 
Joyce S. Court
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Thank you Lisa. Mr. Happy and I had such fun when he visited.

12/2/2011 12:12:49 PM

 
Laura E. Swan
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This was so INTERESTING. I loved reading every word. WOW. Mr. Happy had no idea, at first, how famous a place and people he was visiting. Cemetaries are usually not HAPPY places so I can sure understand why he might have wanted to roll back to the car in the beginning...Joyce, you have cultured him. And us. This was terrific!!!

-Laura :)

12/19/2011 1:29:07 PM

 
Douglas Perry
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Thank you Mr Withers. The ugly needed and needs to be documented too.

12/26/2011 6:48:24 AM

 
Joyce S. Court
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Yes it does. The documentation of both the good and the ugly is the way our culture records history. Makes one wonder what is out there that needs to be photographed to continue the historical thread.

12/26/2011 7:02:33 AM

 
Laura E. Swan
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member since: 1/22/2008
 

For sure!

12/26/2011 11:59:14 AM

 
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