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Photography Question 
Jim Miotke
BetterPhoto Member
BetterPhotoJim.com
Owner, BetterPhoto.com, Inc.
 

Portraiture Tips


What tips can you give your fellow photographers?


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8/20/2000

 
Romen Vargas   Whenever I take portraits I always try to get the subject relaxed around me, this could take some time. Methods on getting them to relax is to have them talk to you or strike up a conversation. After my first venture of taking portraits of my friend and his girlfriend, several have asked me to do some of them, too. I generally ask them how they met, and what their best/romantic time was. It puts a nice natural smile on their face when they talk like that.

If its just one person you can ask them about the best holiday they had, or what their dream holiday would be, what their soulmate would be like, etc. Try and find some place where they also feel relaxed, to me portraits indoors and outdoors are just as great. If outdoors, go for a shaded area so there are no harsh shadows. If indoors, sit them near a window. Try not to shoot them with their shoulder square to the camera, turn them to the side a little. Get to know your subject and try to bring out their character (shy, playful, teasy, cutesy, etc). I hope that babble helped...8-)


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8/20/2000

 
John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/27/2001
  Another method for doing this in an informal portrait is to work around them while they are doing something they normally do, especially a hobby or avocation. While working, you can ask questions beforehand to explain what they do, and while working you can ask details . . . in between shooting frames while moving to a different perspective. Look at the works of some of the great portrait photographers. They not only contain technical excellence in composition, focus and exposure, they also capture a piece of the person's character and what they do, typically where they work and/or live.


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8/28/2000

 
John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/27/2001
  When doing a portrait, divide your subject into thirds. Many portrait photographers will refer to portraits as full, 2/3 or 1/3. The 1/3 is from just below the bustline to the head. The 2/3 is from about half-way up the thigh to the head, and a full includes the feet.

It nearly always better to cut an image off between body joints, and in a 1/3, either go above or below the bustline. If you don't include the shoulders I recommend getting very tight on the face alone. Cutting one off at the bustline or at a joint, especially the waist, can look unnatural unless the pose is highly unusual.

If you do a full body portrait remember that the face will be small in comparison to the entire image. These are generally used for very large enlargements.


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8/28/2000

 
Bonnie    I'm not sure what the question is--so I'm not sure what the answer is..sorry


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6/4/2002 5:20:19 PM

 
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