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Photography Question 
Adrie Uys
 

Copying Of Colour Slides and Old Photos


I have a flatbed scanner, Proline Scanmate 310p. I want to load a lot of old photos and colour slides onto my computer. What equipment is available, what do you recommend, and what are the prices? Nobody can help me to recommend something to get my slides onto my computer. Please help.


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7/2/2002 3:38:16 PM

 
doug Nelson   You can scan your prints on your flatbed. You will need some sort of imaging program to scan into. Elements by Adobe comes to mind.

For your slides you can buy a film scanner, OR take them to a shop that will put them on Kodak Photo CD for you. Choose only your best slides for this, or you'll spend enough to buy a film scanner. Check out the articles on my web page for some specifics about scanning.


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7/4/2002 7:44:20 PM

 
T Lee  
 
  Contest Winner
Contest Winner
Notice the dust and jagginess in the image . Scanned by a lab from Print
© T Lee
 
  Precious
Precious
More dust, and that scratch wasn't there previously either.Scanned by a lab from neg
© T Lee
 
  Santa Baby
Santa Baby
Believe it or not, none of the marks are reflections, not even the big one to the right of center. Scanned by a lab from neg
© T Lee
 
  Weed
Weed
Not a very good shot, but it does show the scanner's capabilities. Delta 400, slightly over-processed.
© T Lee
 
 
Hi Adrie,

I was unable to find much when I did a search on the internet for your scanner, so I haven't any information on doing a scan from neg or slide on your particular scanner. One thing that I can suggest though, is instead of a dedicated film scanner, perhaps it is time to upgrade your scanner to a more practical one for your purposes.

I have an Epson Perfection 1250. (1200x2400dpi and 48bit color) There is also a 1650 (1600*??? dpi), but I've never even used the full resolution of the 1250, so couldn't justify the extra money for that one. I generally scan at 300dpi and 24bit color, so the need for 1600xwhatever dpi seems unlikely. I bought the one with the Photo scanner attachment, and it cost me $200Cdn total. I believe that translates to about $135USD.

When I bought it... I didn't expect much out of it. I thought, "really... $200 how good can it be?" It knocked my socks off. It has more than paid for itself since I bought it. I shoot mainly black and white, and learned after the first time that I paid to have it developed, that I didn't want to go that route again. I now develop the film in my basement, and make contact prints. If time does not permit for the contact prints, or if it's too darn cold in the basement ( like in the winter in my uninsulated basement.) and I'm feeling like a wimp, then I sit down and scan the pics onto the computer. The quality of the scans far far outperforms my expectations. I use Delta 400 as my primary film, and have recently been playing with Delta 100, even the grain from the 400 isn't terribly noticable until I scan at HUGE resolutions. I have even scanned Delta 3200, and found that the scans were no more noticably grainy than an 8x10 print.

The other reason that I mention this scanner, is that I have a PhotoCD that was made for me at a lab. It's got dust in it, and poor quality images, even though I supplied them images. I was burnt, and will never go back to that method. (Especially now that I have a scanner that does way better than they did. :) )

Stormi


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7/13/2002 5:42:02 PM

 
Adrie Uys   Hi Doug and Stormi

Thanks a lot for your advice. Thanks Doug for the valuable facts on your web page. It really gave me a better insight. Keep up the good work. Thanks Stormi, I will definately buy me a better scanner. Adrie Uys.


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7/14/2002 5:07:16 AM

 
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