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Photography Question 
Vinod K. Menon
BetterPhoto Member Since: 12/9/2006
 

Wildlife


 
  Wild Instinct
Wild Instinct

Exposure time 1/500 s
F-number f/3.5
Exposure program Portrait mode
ISO speed ratings ISO 80

Exposure bias value -1.30 eV

Metering mode Pattern

White balance Auto white balance
Scene capture type Portrait

Portrait Mode was used since I was under the impression that Potrait mode would be ideal for animals just like Humans.

© Vinod K. Menon
Sony Cyber-shot DS...
 
  Yawning
Yawning
Camera - Sony DSC H2

Exposure time 1/200 s
F-number f/3.5
Exposure program Portrait mode
ISO speed ratings ISO 80

Exposure bias value -1.30 eV

Metering mode Pattern


White balance Auto white balance
Scene capture type Portrait

© Vinod K. Menon
Sony Cyber-shot DS...
 
 
Hi

Just wanted to know the areas of improvement - Photo taken in wild. using my point and shoot sony dsc h2

Thanks


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4/6/2008 9:06:15 AM

 
W.   
I'm not sure if or how Portrait Mode applies to scenes shot at 432mm focal length (35mm eq.). A focal length that really requires a tripod, of course. The 'yawning' image doesn't look like it has the DoF of F/3.5.

I wouldn't worry too much about the technical aspects, Vinod, but rather concentrate on composition, light angles, and capturing exactly the right moment. Again and again and again.


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4/6/2008 5:29:23 PM

 
Pete H
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/9/2005
  Vinod,

"Portrait mode" or scene modes wrest all control from the photographer.

May I suggest for the image you posted to close down the f/stop to at least f/8
for better depth of field AND a sharper image in general.

"Portrait mode" forces the camera into a wide open f/stop to do nothing but blur the background.

all the best,

Pete


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4/6/2008 9:51:49 PM

 
Samuel Smith
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/21/2004
  i grow weary vinod.in the wild?
you post such data as to confuse us.
it's possible I am wrong about ws,and you with your arrogance and knowledge.
with your stream of shutter speeds and apertures,and that time of day eludes you,well.
that if I owe an apology,not to you,but to someone else I have accused,i will.
sam


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4/7/2008 11:45:02 PM

 
Vinod K. Menon
BetterPhoto Member Since: 12/9/2006
  Thanks for the tips Will & Pete.
Sam did'nt get what you wanted to convey - data given is basic exif - it helps to provide those so people know how the shot was taken & without that it would be guess work- would'nt it ?


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4/22/2008 1:00:27 PM

 
Samuel Smith
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/21/2004
  are you at a zoo?or are you out in the wild learning the habits of the tiger and captured this?
light changes so fast that your not helping.overall your idea is right,but even slight variations make a difference.
if you want to instruct you must know the students.


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4/22/2008 7:08:08 PM

 
Vinod K. Menon
BetterPhoto Member Since: 12/9/2006
  Sam the photos are shot in wild - what would you reccomend so that I could do a better job next time.
Thanks


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4/23/2008 11:36:24 AM

 
W.   
"the photos are shot in wild"

Must've been from the back of an elephant! I can't see any other way you could have gotten these with a Sony DSC H2 and live to tell the tale.


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4/23/2008 12:06:47 PM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  Vinod,
Perhaps you should define "shot in the wild" before anyone can offer constructive advice.


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4/23/2008 3:25:03 PM

 
W.   
That seems to be a problem, Bob...


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4/25/2008 5:14:20 AM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  "In the wild", to most of us entails a specific list of criteria:

A) The animal has free will to appear (or not) and exhibit natural behavior within its own environs.

B) The animal is not caged, confined, tethered or controlled by humans in any way.

C) No food or other attractant was utilized to coerce the animal into shooting range.

Given these parameters, photographs taken at wildlife preserves, National Parks and other protected venues where wildlife/humankind encounters are more frequent CAN be considered "in the wild". (...But only if the animal is free to leave whenever it wishes.)


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4/25/2008 6:32:09 PM

 
W.   
"(...But only if the animal is free to leave whenever it wishes.)"

OR "only if the animal is free to attack whenever it wishes"...


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4/26/2008 2:55:42 AM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  This is true!
(Thankfully, the animals I normally seek out don't like Italian food. :)


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4/26/2008 4:32:29 PM

 
Vinod K. Menon
BetterPhoto Member Since: 12/9/2006
  Will- the shot was taken from inside the forest jeep ( how I wish I could have taken it from an elephants back - could have got some better photos )

Bob- the shot was taken in a South Indian Wildlife sanctuary - where the tiger was free to roam & as Will said free to attack ( reason why we had to coup up in a safari jeep) ;-)


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4/27/2008 1:04:14 PM

 
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