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Photography Question 
Jessica  Wright
 

blownout background


Hi I have a picture of a couple and the picture was taken in front of sliding glass windows. The picture had a lot of blown out highlights. How do I avoid this for future photos? Thanks.


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11/2/2007 7:13:06 PM

 
Jessica  Wright   I forgot to add to my question that the couple was my parents. Again thanks for any help.


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11/2/2007 7:17:11 PM

 
Pete H
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/9/2005
  Hello Jessica,

Are the people blown out or the sliding glass doors?

If just the glass doors, then this is quite normal. It's called back lighting..In other words, the background is considerably brighter than the subjects.

There are workarounds for this, but we'll wait for more info from you.


all the best,

Pete


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11/3/2007 6:06:12 AM

 
Jessica  Wright   Hi its the light coming thru the sliding glass doors that are blown out. The coloring of the people is normal. Should I have used a fill flash and any filters.? Again thank you so much for your help.


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11/3/2007 2:10:03 PM

 
Jessica  Wright   I also forgot to add the picture was taken with a point and shoot camera amd most of the settings were auto.


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11/3/2007 3:50:36 PM

 
Karla J. Cox
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/15/2006
  If just the doors are blown out, you need to add more light to the people and adjust exposure...in other words match the exposure of the background and the exposure of the people. Or Photoshop it!


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11/3/2007 5:08:35 PM

 
Pete H
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/9/2005
  Jessica,

Fill flash is a way to do it, but now you will probably have the problem of the flash reflecting off the glass doors..Not a pretty sight. LOL

When (any) background is unusually bright, I can not think of a way to capture the outdoor image AND the people in the photo with one shot. You will either have to photoshop it or wait until the background light is of a similar exposure value to your main subject.
I'll try to find an example that might help.

all the best,

Pete


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11/3/2007 6:31:02 PM

 
Pete H
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/9/2005
 
 
 
Here ya' go Jessica.
This is a untouched snapshot I took.

The outside is well enough exposed that you can tell it is tree foliage. It is NOT exposed perfectly.

The shot was late afternoon so the outdoor portion of the photo is not entirely blown out...The upper left hand corner is..Oh well, that was NOT my interest in this snap.
I did have to think a little about reflections from the glass behind the subject..No big deal..all I did was adjust my shooting angle so the on camera flash was in line with the curtain and NOT shooting into glass. Voila'!..No reflection.

Yes..This is a form of fill flash somewhat balanced with the light outside.
If you post a photo of your situation, I;m sure we could analyze it a little better.

Pete


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11/3/2007 6:45:58 PM

 
Jessica  Wright  
 
 
Thanks for your helpful tips.
Here is the picture .


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11/4/2007 5:16:22 AM

 
Jessica  Wright  
 
 
sorry about not sending the pic last time. here it is again. again thanks for all the help.


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11/4/2007 5:22:09 AM

 
Pete H
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/9/2005
  Thanks for posting the pic.

Yep, this is a simple back lit situation. Use your flash.

Pete


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11/4/2007 5:31:51 AM

 
Jessica  Wright   Thanks for all your help.


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11/4/2007 6:25:18 PM

 
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