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Photography Question 
Sarah L. Musselman
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/1/2007
 

Best portrait lenses for a Canon xi


I have recently broken the barrier between amateur photography and semi-professional photography. (I have a day job in marketing.) I've found that while I have an "eye" for most forms of photography, I really excel in portraiture. I want to know what lenses are best for this type of photography. (I have a Canon xti.)


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6/4/2007 9:49:03 AM

 
Leisa Allen
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/7/2007
  I have the 50mm 1.8. I love it and it is relatively cheap. It takes great portraits.


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6/4/2007 10:46:52 AM

 
Amy H. Maple
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/29/2007
  I also have the 50mm f/1.8. I love it too! keep in mind though that it is a prime lens. I love what it has done for my pictures. Good Luck.


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6/4/2007 12:27:47 PM

 
Sarah L. Musselman
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/1/2007
  Thanks! Any suggestions for a telephoto or zoom lens? Perhaps it's not necessary?


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6/4/2007 2:26:25 PM

 
Amy H. Maple
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/29/2007
  Some people swear that a prime lens will give you sharper images. I don't know b/c I have not had the opportunity to compare a prime to a zoom lens. The only reason I don't have a zoom lens is b/c of price...the one I wanted was over $2,000. I am very pleased w/ what I get w/ the 50mm, I just have to move around to get close up to my subject. And, when I am far away and can't get closer to the subject, I just have to deal w/ it. Hope this helps.


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6/4/2007 5:07:39 PM

 
Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/4/2004
 
 
 

Boy this question is coming up alot these days.
So here is a post from a previous post. Just look for thier counter parts in Canon.

I find it best to work with my 200mm
when doing portraits 100-300 is recommended, you do not want to be switching lens alot in a portrait sitting and you are working with a space that allows you little control of your background.
Typical "portrait" lenses are therefore between 90 and 135 MM long.
most professionals use 70-200/2.8 or 80-200/2.8 zooms as portrait lenses,
or better yet 100 or 105 macro.
A lot depends on where you want to start and you pocket book.
I hope this helps,
Debby Tabb
* In my reg portrait sitting camera bag I have:
Nikon D200 and Fuji S2
Nikon 24-120mm 1:3.5 Vr Lens
Tamron 28-300 AF 1:3.5 macro lens
Tamron 28-200 AF 1:3.5 macro lens
on site extras:
SB800s
Polarizes, soft focus and Centre Soft and asst. other filters depending on the job.



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6/4/2007 6:59:37 PM

 
Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/4/2004
 
 
 

Boy this question is coming up alot these days.
So here is a post from a previous post. Just look for thier counter parts in Canon.

I find it best to work with my 200mm
when doing portraits 100-300 is recommended, you do not want to be switching lens alot in a portrait sitting and you are working with a space that allows you little control of your background.
Typical "portrait" lenses are therefore between 90 and 135 MM long.
most professionals use 70-200/2.8 or 80-200/2.8 zooms as portrait lenses,
or better yet 100 or 105 macro.
A lot depends on where you want to start and you pocket book.
I hope this helps,
Debby Tabb
* In my reg portrait sitting camera bag I have:
Nikon D200 and Fuji S2
Nikon 24-120mm 1:3.5 Vr Lens
Tamron 28-300 AF 1:3.5 macro lens
Tamron 28-200 AF 1:3.5 macro lens
on site extras:
SB800s
Polarizes, soft focus and Centre Soft and asst. other filters depending on the job.



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6/4/2007 6:59:45 PM

 
Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/4/2004
 
Boy this question is coming up alot these days.
So here is a post from a previous post. Just look for thier counter parts in Canon.

I find it best to work with my 200mm
when doing portraits 100-300 is recommended, you do not want to be switching lens alot in a portrait sitting and you are working with a space that allows you little control of your background.
Typical "portrait" lenses are therefore between 90 and 135 MM long.
most professionals use 70-200/2.8 or 80-200/2.8 zooms as portrait lenses,
or better yet 100 or 105 macro.
A lot depends on where you want to start and you pocket book.
I hope this helps,
Debby Tabb
* In my reg portrait sitting camera bag I have:
Nikon D200 and Fuji S2
Nikon 24-120mm 1:3.5 Vr Lens
Tamron 28-300 AF 1:3.5 macro lens
Tamron 28-200 AF 1:3.5 macro lens
on site extras:
SB800s
Polarizes, soft focus and Centre Soft and asst. other filters depending on the job.



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6/4/2007 6:59:56 PM

 
Suzanne Colson
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/31/2006
  I have the 50mm f/1.4 and the 85mm f/1.8. I love both depending on the situation, but the 85mm always seems a little sharper. Both of these lenses, to me, offer the best quality for the price. I think sharper then some of the 'L' lenses I have tried.

I also use the 70-200mm f/4.0L IS lens as well and also love the sharpness, but am thinking about upgrading to the f/2.8 version for the beautiful bokeh it produces.

By the way, I use on a Canon 30D so the crop factor is the same as your XTi.


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6/5/2007 10:12:08 AM

 
John P. Sandstedt
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/8/2001
Contact John
John's Gallery
  Generally, the best portrait lenses have a 85 to 125 mm focal length [that's the film equivalent.] Thus, the suggestions regarding the 50 mm lenses above are right on target, but the folks didn't point out that, with the 1.6 lens factor of the XTi, you'll be shooting at ~80-85 mm. A little short, but a great way to have an inexpensive portrait lens that boasts a faster aperture.

That extra speed is worth gettin for a mere 5 mm of focal length. And, the price is really right.


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6/5/2007 12:41:09 PM

 
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