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Photography Question 
Blake T. Lipthratt
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/30/2006
 

Sharpening!


I see so many images on here, especially portraits that have this intriguing sharpness about them that almost seems unreal. What is the key to getting crisp images? Is there a filter in PS (I have CS2) that is commonly used for this? I have read that aperture has a lot to do with sharpness but how do you decide which F stop is the most effective? Many questions here, hope someone can touch on at least a few. Thanks!


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4/8/2007 11:52:48 AM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  Tack-sharp images are the result of good technique and great optics.

"Sharpening" can only help to actualize what's already there.


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4/8/2007 12:15:52 PM

 
Thomas    The use of a TRIPOD is the best you can do to achieve sharp images!


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4/8/2007 12:30:38 PM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  That's so true Thomas...
(...part of technique.)


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4/8/2007 12:33:42 PM

 
Thomas    Also, when uploading to websites re-sharpen the image (unsharp mask) after re-sizing your image helps for better results when viewed on the web!

Best regards!


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4/8/2007 12:45:31 PM

 
William Schuette
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/8/2006
  Blake, I agree with both Bob and Thomas with regard to technique and tack sharp photos. I am not sure what photos you find "intriguing" with regard to sharpness, but I can say that I find that many, many photos are over sharpened to the point of artificiality. Sharpening is like any other technique, use it to the point it enhances your vision and not one pixel more.

Bill


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4/8/2007 1:46:11 PM

 
W.   
 
  DoF
DoF
© W.
Miscellaneous Does...
 
 

Hi Blake,

"I have read that aperture has a lot to do with sharpness but how do you decide which F stop is the most effective?

The aperture affects the 'DoF' (Depth of Field; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depth_of_field), the area in front and behind the focal point that is sharp. Basically: small aperture gives deep DoF, large aperture results in shallow DoF. But you, or your 'AF' (autofocus) system, determine(s) where the focal point IS around which the DoF is 'anchored'.
When the exposure button is halfway pressed, many camera's viewfinders show exactly at what point in the image the AF system has focused. And a number allow you to adjust that focal point using the ribbed wheels.

And if your camera has a bracketing function, you can choose later which DoF you like best from a range of exposures with different apertures. Of course the camera's point of view needs to be absolutely identical during those exposures. That requires a rock solid point of view. So most probably tripod work.


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4/8/2007 3:46:36 PM

 
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