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Photography Question 
Carin Griffith
 

Photographing Babies/Toddlers Using Natural Light


 
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Nikon D70 Digital ...
 
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Brady & Taylor
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Sleeping
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What settings are recommended for photographing babies/toddlers using natural light? (Equipment: Nikon D70 with Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8 lens) I set my priority to shutter at 1/60 because I REALLY don't want to use a tripod... I'm moving constantly, and many of my candid shots wouldn't be caught if I were struggling with a tripod. (I also like very unique angles, and wouldn't be able to do them with a tripod.) I shoot in my living room with a very large window -- seems to give good light. My f-stop usually sets itself to 2.8 at 1/60 ss. How are photographers getting good photos -- with minimal subject movement -- with natural light? If I up my shutter speed to eliminate (or just decrease) subject motion blur, then it's way too dark! EEKKK! I understand shutter/aperture and how it all works... I can't seem to find a way for it all to work with natural light. I also feel like I have more issues with focusing because of the lower light. Any suggestions would be VERY much appreciated!


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3/26/2007 9:10:32 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Buy or make a big white reflector to prop up outside to reflect more light thru the window.





Later


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3/27/2007 1:09:57 AM

 
Anna N. Spruill
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/2/2006
aspruillphotography.com
  A reflector will help. You could try increasing your iso along with your shutter speed. This will let in more natural light, but help decrease blur. The downfall is you may have some minimal noise. If so there are many programs (some free) that can help reduce noise.
Good Luck!


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3/27/2007 3:55:22 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Iso is just a sensitivity increase, not a light level.


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3/27/2007 9:18:18 AM

 
Anna N. Spruill
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/2/2006
aspruillphotography.com
  Sorry if my terms need to be corrected. Though I think most understood my point.

Anyway a revised answer:
You stated your photos were dark when increasing your shutter speed -so a simple solution would be to also increase your iso.
The higher the ISO, the more sensitive the image sensor and therefore makes it possible to take photos in low-light situations.
In other words less blur and more light!!!
Hope this helps, Good Luck!


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3/27/2007 10:08:49 AM

 
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