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Photography Question 
Rajesh Vaccha
 

Can I use Kodak T400 CN instead of Tri-X?


Hello,

I am currently in Cambodia/Thailand and have run out of my rolls of Kodak 400 Tri-X.

I am a intro to Photography student in Philadelphia, and until now have just processed Tri X using the 9 3/4 minute Kodak developer, 68 degrees temperature, fix etc. to process the negatives.

Does anyone know if I can use Kodak T400CN as a substitute and still develop it in a similar manner?

Unless...someone knows of a shop in Siem Reap or Bangkok where I can get Tri X or other more appropriate film?

Finally, can anyone please explain if I can use Kodak 125 Plus X in non motion, bright light (daylight), as I will be taking photos in the day of statues and temples (all outdoors).

Thanks a lot friends, I am loving shooting, thats why I ran out of film!

RJ


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3/4/2007 5:31:58 AM

 
Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/18/2000
  Kodak T400CN is black & white, but it requires C-41 (color print film) processing. It cannot be developed using traditional B&W developing chemicals. Yes, you can use 125 Plus X in the conditions you describe.


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3/4/2007 6:02:40 AM

 
Alan N. Marcus   Hi Rajesh,

Jon, as always is right on target.
Just expanding on C-41.

Kodak T400CN is a black & white film designed to be processed at your neighborhood one-hour lab. You can expose this film and then trust it to any local shop.

All photofinishing operations, across the world, develop and print color negative film. These shops have standardized world wide using chemicals compatible with the Kodak C-41 process.

Shops wishing to offer B&W services must maintain a separate developing machine. This is true because conventional B&W products will be damaged by the C-41 process. Due to cost and space limitations most shops will not offer B&W services on the premises.

Knowing a void exists, many film makers market a B&W product know as a chromogenic. This material is processed in any standard C-41 film developing machine. The film yields a suitable black & white negative. However it is substandard when compared to the conventional B&W product.

Best regards,
Alan Marcus


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3/4/2007 8:52:09 AM

 
John H. Siskin
BetterPhoto Member
John-Siskin.com
John's Photo Courses:
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  Hi Rajesh,
To expand on the expansion. The chromogenic film from Ilford prints well in a traditional enlarger with Polycontrast or Multigrade filters and papers. The Kodak product does NOT. Although it can be printed in a regular darkroom it is harder to print. It prints very well in a one hour type machine on color paper.
Thanks, John Siskin


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3/4/2007 9:54:05 AM

 
Rajesh Vaccha   Hi Friends,

Thanks for the messages, sorry to ask so many silly questions....I am really keen on learning and my instructor is not available too often.

Ok, so after a lot of searching, I have found Fuji NEOPAN 400 135-36. Is that ok? I have been using and only processed Kodak TRI-X 400 so far...

Can I use Neopan 400 and develop it in a similar fashion (I presume I will need to adjust development times) as I would develop Kodak TRI-X?

Finally, how does Neopan 400 compare with Kodak Tri-X 400? I presume it is better than using the Kodak B+W Chromogenic film.

I will be visiting my last Temple of the trip in 8 hours (I just found the film this evening) and want to do some daylight portraits of children in the village...will Neopan 400 be ok?

I used the Kodak Plus X 125 today as I had no other option and had 2 rolls of Plus X and it was really difficult to shoot although there was decent daylight...

Thanks a lot for all your time, trust me I really appreciate it.

AK


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3/5/2007 8:42:13 AM

 
John H. Siskin
BetterPhoto Member
John-Siskin.com
John's Photo Courses:
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  Wat Thai Temple, North Hills, California
Wat Thai Temple, North Hills, California
© John H. Siskin
4-Week Short Course: An Introduction to Photographic Lighting
 
 
The Neopan will process in a similar manner to TRI-X. Kodak has times and temps on their website for their XTOL developer. I don't know about times and temps for other developers, you might try the Fuji site. Good shooting! Thanks, John


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3/5/2007 10:07:52 AM

 
Rajesh Vaccha   Thanks a lot for your help Mr. Siskin, and to everyone else on this forum who keep contributing to my posts and many others!

RJ


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3/5/2007 10:16:00 AM

 
John H. Siskin
BetterPhoto Member
John-Siskin.com
John's Photo Courses:
4-Week Short Course: An Introduction to Photographic Lighting
  No problem, good luck! John Siskin


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3/5/2007 10:55:50 AM

 
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