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Category: New Questions

Photography Question 
Kari J. Wickstrom
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/13/2007
 

aperture


I've only recently begun shooting in manual mode, and I've been trying to adjust my aperture. I can't seem to get it to go higher than f8.0. I use an Olympus Evolt 500. Is that just how it's done? Or is there a trick I haven't learned yet? I'm also curious about ISO and what it's all about. :-) Thanks


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2/13/2007 8:18:40 PM

 
Craig m. Zacarelli
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/3/2005
  in M mode you cant go to f11 or 16??? what lens is it you use? ...Hmmm this seems funny.. even in AV mode it wont go past f8 up to 11 or 16 or above?


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2/14/2007 5:22:30 AM

 
Kari J. Wickstrom
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/13/2007
  Ok I really must be an idiot. I just tried it, in M mode, and it went to f22. I must have been in a different mode. I'm trying to learn this camera, and all the different shooting modes. I've always only used a point and shoot.


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2/14/2007 6:18:38 AM

 
Alan N. Marcus   Hi Kari,

You are asking about the camera controls and how and how to manipulate them. This is what I call “the exposure problem”. This problem can be looked at in the same way as the act of filling a glass at the kitchen sink.

Allow me to explain.

Are you thirsty? Let’s get a glass of water.

You grab a glass from the cupboard. Is the glass big or small? Big means it will hold a lot of water thus it will take time to fill. Thus a big glass approximates a low sensitivity or slow film and is assigned a tiny ISO value like 100. A small glass fills in a short time approximating a high or fast ISO like 800.

Many years ago the industry standardized how film speed (sensitivity) was measured. The International Standards Organization to the rescue. The ISO established uniform test methods. Later when digital cameras came along, the same standards were adopted.

The amount of light that reaches the chip is dependent on a combination of the lens aperture (lens size) and the length of time light is allowed to play (shutter speed) on the chip.

Now to fill the glass at the kitchen faucet we open the valve wide and water flows quick and fast. This setting acts just like lens aperture. You flip the handle on then off, this action times the event (shutter speed). If a flow duration of 1/60 (one-sixtieth) second fills a glass then it will take 1/30 (one-thirtieth) of a second to fill the same glass if the faucet is only half open.

This was a meager attempt to explain the exposure problem.


Luck to you,

Alan Marcus
ammarcus@earthlik.net


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2/14/2007 6:30:28 AM

 
Irene Troy
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/27/2004
  Hi Kari and welcome to BP!

If I may make a suggestion; grab the manual that came with your camera, your camera and every lens that you own (if it’s more than one). Tonight, while you sit in front of the TV (or whatever you listen/watch) and go through the manual step by step, trying every setting with every lens, until you have a good grasp on the way in which the camera feels and operates. There is so much to learn when you get a new camera, particularly if the camera is very different from anything you used before. I know that reading the manual can be dull and I have often ignored the advice I am offering to you and lived to regret it. It will make things much easier if you slowly go through the manual while you have time and try every setting combination. It sure beats standing outside trying to capture that “once in a lifetime” shot and having the camera not function as expected solely because you do not fully understand how to use the camera. This has happened to me, so, please don’t be insulted and think that I am questioning your ability in any way! Good luck and come back with some images for us to see.

Irene


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2/14/2007 6:34:30 AM

 
Craig m. Zacarelli
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/3/2005
  Oh great Alan.... Now Im thirsty.. thanks alot!
lol


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2/14/2007 6:45:12 AM

 
Kari J. Wickstrom
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/13/2007
  thanks everyone! I started reading the manual last night. A lot of what it talks about I don't get just yet. Like, how do you know when to adjust the ISO? I did take some 'test' shots with different settings (ISO 200, F8.0, +2 and -2 etc) and I kind of saw how the different settings changes the way the picture looks. I'll keep at it. I've got 10 years to become a good photographer (lol that's when my youngest becomes an adult). I am considering taking an intro to dig. photography course at the local college. I have some pictures on here, but they were all taken in auto mode. Thanks again for all your help!!


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2/14/2007 6:50:48 AM

 
Craig m. Zacarelli
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/3/2005
  you should be able to tell the ISO fron the LCD or top LCD screens. The manual should say.. look in the front or look up ISO its prolly under "Exposure"

There is an awesome book out called understanding exposure.. I reccomend it.. I have been shooting for some time now and still found it very interesting.
your best bet is to shoot, shoot, shoot and shoot some more.. see what each setting does and how it works!
good luck!


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2/14/2007 6:54:38 AM

 
Kari J. Wickstrom
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/13/2007
 
 
  practice
practice
f5/6 ISO 100 +1.0
© Kari J. Wickstrom
Olympus Evolt E500...
 
  practice2
practice2
f8.0 ISO 200 -1.0
© Kari J. Wickstrom
Olympus Evolt E500...
 
 
Ok I'm going to try to upload 2 pictures I did late last night. I was playing with the different settings, and I was suprised how they turned out. It's just a close up on some leaves from one of my plants...but... the first one (forgive me if I say this wrong) was set to: f5.6 ISO 100 +1.0, and the other one was, f8.0 ISO 200 -1.0.


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2/14/2007 7:05:42 AM

 
Mike Rubin
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/15/2004
  The responses and suggestions so far have been great, and can't be improved on, but here is another explaination on ISO :

A high ISO is used when you cannot use the shutter speed that you want, along with a low ISO (100). If you are in low light and cannot get a good exposure with the shutter speed selected, you can raise the ISO. That would allow you to use a faster shutter speed. Ex: You are indoors at night with low light and do not want to use a flash. You already know that with the focal length you choose, you may end up with a blurred photo due to camera shake at a slow shutter speed so to be able to raise the shutter speed and still get a proper exposure, you raise the ISO to 400 or higher. This also works when you need to freeze motion in a low light situation, it will allow the faster shutter speed you need to freeze the movement of people such as a dancer. This makes the film (camera sensor) more sensitive to light. It will be able to “see in the dark” better. Therefore you can use a higher shutter speed. The tradeoff is that while you can now use a faster shutter speed, there will be noise in the image. It appears as small flecks in the image. This is the same look that film gives under the same situation. With film, it is the film grain that becomes visible.


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2/14/2007 8:58:54 AM

 
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