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Photography Question 
Kathy Walsh
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/20/2006
 

Greeting cards


I've been making cards for friends and family with some of my photographs, and have been pasting the picture on the front a blank, folded note card. I've thought about trying to sell some in a friends bookstore, but I don't think they look "polished" enough. I am wondering if anyone has any ideas on how to make the cards look a little more professional. I love the look of the Photographers Edge cards, but like most people here have stated, they are too expensive. Any ideas would be appreciate. Thanks.


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12/15/2006 10:09:24 PM

 
Carolyn  M. Fletcher
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/6/2001
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  Photographer's Edge is quite accomodating in that you can "buddy" up with other people on your order and considerably reduce your price that way. They will split up the shipment however you tell them to.


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12/16/2006 2:20:10 AM

 
Kathy Walsh
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/20/2006
  Thanks for the advice about Photographers Edge. That's definately an option, but I would still rather make my own. Any other suggestions would be great but in the meantime, I'll continue to try and refine the look of my cards:)


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12/16/2006 9:58:26 PM

 
Michael H. Cothran   Do you have your own inkjet printer? Do you have post editing software, such as Photoshop? If so, it's very easy to print your own note cards. And very inexpensive to boot. You can use standard inkjet paper such as Epson's Heavyweight matte in 8x10 or letter size, and cut down to 7x10, or check out third party papers especially made for note cards from Red River.
A trip to a local paper company will give you matching white A7 envelopes, and a call to Impact Images will give you packaging envelopes. Note - Impact Images or Red River can also provide A7 envelopes.
You can design your own card layout in PS, one horizontal, and one vertical, and print whatever text information you would like on the back. Add a pintstripe and drop shadow around the image, and you're flying first class.
Save your master file with all layers intact, and you can simply delete one image, and add another at will. You can then save a separate flattened version of each note card image in order to save time each time you want to print one, and also save on hard drive space. Nothing to it. Good luck.
Michael H. Cothran


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12/18/2006 7:08:27 PM

 
Michael H. Cothran   One other point - Some papers specially made for note cards come pre-scored. If you choose to use less expensive 8x10 or letter size paper, you will need to score it yourself. No problem - I use a dull awl, but any kind of blunt instrument with a rounded bottom will work. Just don't apply too much pressure when scoring - a very slight crease is all you need.
Michael H. Cothran


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12/18/2006 7:13:58 PM

 
Kathy Walsh
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/20/2006
  Michael,

Thanks so much for your response. You described exactly what I'm looking for. I've been looking at buying Photoshop Elements instead of the more expensive one since it looks like it is capable of everything I need. My one last question, I promise:), is how do your pictures look printed on cardstock type paper instead of photo paper? The ones I've printed seem a little dull, but maybe adding the pinstripe, etc. in photoshop makes all of the difference. I'll give it a try and thanks again for your help.


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12/20/2006 7:44:28 AM

 
Michael H. Cothran   I've never used note card stock paper. I have always printed on 8x10 Epson Heavyweight paper, and cut it down to 7x10.
I would imagine that your dull ink problem is due to an inappropriate printing profile. You might check with the manufacturer of your card stock to see if they have a profile specifically designed for your printer and ink combination.
One caution about PSE, as compared to CS2 - You really do need the guide lines that are available with CS2 in order to design and place your image and pinstripe in the exact location on your paper. I don't believe that PSE comes with guideline capability, unless it was added in PSE4. Perhaps someone else could address that issue with more authority, but I would personally not attempt to do any graphic designing, note card layouts included, without the use of guidelines.
Please feel free to ask any questions you might have. If you desire, you can also contact me via email.
Michael H. Cothran


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12/20/2006 3:25:33 PM

 
Kathy Walsh
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/20/2006
  Thanks for all of your advice Michael. I'll definately look to see if PSE has the guideline capabilities before I go out and buy it. In the meantime, I'll occupy myself with getting out and taking some pictures:) Looks like we're finally getting some snow here in the Sierras!! Thanks again.
Kathy


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12/21/2006 8:08:13 PM

 
Inspirations by Kristy 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/15/2005
  Kathy,

I use Lumapix and whcc (white House Custum Colour) They make them for you and you just upload them in the Roes program. They have folded and flat and they are on card stock. In lumapix you can design them yourself.

Very fast and affordable.

Kristy


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12/27/2006 10:37:04 PM

 
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