BetterPhoto Q&A
Category: New Questions

Photography Question 
Tami Rook
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/26/2006
 

Portrait ??


 
  Black eyes?
Black eyes?
© Tami Rook
Olympus Evolt E300...
 
 
Well 2nd go around Some people clearly photo graph better then others LOL Why do black eyes
Capture the light?


To love this question, log in above
10/10/2006 5:19:50 AM

 
W.    1) that little boy has brown eyes, with black pupils.
3) EVERYbody has black pupils.
2) brown eyes don't capture light any more than blue or green eyes do.


To love this comment, log in above
10/10/2006 5:32:30 AM

 
Tami Rook
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/26/2006
  per the mother they are black.. brown perhaps then very very dark brown.

however thx for the education...

The mothers eyes did not capture the light where they are both in the photo?


To love this comment, log in above
10/10/2006 5:44:04 AM

 
W.    Then the mother needs new glasses: NO human being has black eyes (= black irises). They don't exist.

"The mothers eyes did not capture the light where they are both in the photo?"
They're called catchlights, so apparently the mothers' eyes didn't catch the light . . .

But if you want catchlights in the mothers' eyes: you could fake 'm in PP.


To love this comment, log in above
10/10/2006 6:18:05 AM

 
Tami Rook
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/26/2006
  I did state "perhaps very very dark brown" however if you like to push...


read: There are three known human eye color genes named: EYCL1 (gey), the Green/blue eye color gene, located on chromosome 19. EYCL2 (bey1), the central brown eye color gene, possibly located on chromosome 15. EYCL3 (bey2), the Brown/blue eye color gene located on chromosome 15. A role has also been suggested for the Melanocortin Receptor Gene (MCIR) on chromosome 16. A second gene for green has also been postulated. Other eye colors including black, grey, and hazel are not yet explained. We do not yet know what these genes make (except MCIR), or how they produce eye colors. The two gene model (EYCL1 and EYCL3) used here clearly does not explain more than a portion of human eye color inheritance.

This is from a leading genotype medical facility Thank you


To love this comment, log in above
10/10/2006 7:51:09 AM

 
Jagadeesh Andrew Owens   Sounds like W. needs to get out with his camera if all he has to do is argue the varying shades of eye color... ;>O He may also want to spend some time with a book on manners... oh - on the argument of light being caught differently by different colors of eyes, if the same color rules hold true for eyeballs and irises as they do for the rest of the color world, then darker eyes would indeed absorb (capture) more light. I'm out.

Sipho Eish
Artistic & Photographic Monolith


To love this comment, log in above
10/10/2006 11:17:38 AM

 
Tami Rook
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/26/2006
  Sipho Thank you that does make sense, Black does seem to take in the light.
So ???? how do you fix that with lighting, since the complexion is darker if I back the lights we loose definition that sets the personality

LOL stated the facts once it was clear that he just wanted to argue, I said thank you for the education he still seemed to want to argue ??? why he should have checked the facts OK 1 shame on me. Sorry


To love this comment, log in above
10/10/2006 1:42:11 PM

 
Jagadeesh Andrew Owens   I'm not exactly sure if I'm understanding what you want. The one thing that W correctly stated is that those white spots are called catchlights - and you want them! They're a good thing! I don't understand or use studio lighting, so I can't help you there. I can say that the photo has great catchlights.


To love this comment, log in above
10/10/2006 1:46:30 PM

 
Mark Feldstein
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/17/2005
  The greater the opacity, the higher it's reflective value. Pupils don't "capture" anything. They reflect. The reflection is more apparent the darker the pupil. Lighter pupils still produce catchlights.

The most effective lighting set-up produces a catchlight at either the 10:00 or 2:00 position of the eye. A single light in each eye, not two or more, is most like what's referred to as "Rembrandt Lighting". Named after the famous photographer Sidney Milton Rembrandt of Comoniwannashootya, Ontario, Canada.
Take it light.
Mark
============================
Ok, NOW I'm lying. ;)


To love this comment, log in above
10/10/2006 3:59:47 PM

 
Tami Rook
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/26/2006
  LOL ok now you can see just how new I am to this….. here I did it right and I am trying to figure out how to stop getting that 1 light…. Darn it !!! now that I know this I probably will not be able to capture it again….

Thank you Guys for all the help
I wish you guys were closer.... I think a weekend out with the two of you would help me hahaha you can carry the big stick and hit me on the back of the head each time I do it wrong.... and then hit me again when I do it right to lock it in LMAO


To love this comment, log in above
10/10/2006 4:37:41 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Pupils are just an opening. The reflection comes off the wet surface. And it's just easier to see with dark eyes. That's what is meant by capture, not capture as absorbtion. Glossy black GTO, easy to see all the reflecions. Glossy white '51 Chevy Deluxe 2 door sedan, looks nice but the reflections are as prevalent.


To love this comment, log in above
10/10/2006 11:16:04 PM

 
Tami Rook
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/26/2006
  Thank you Gregory, That makes Sense in a big way... Thank you again


To love this comment, log in above
10/11/2006 7:33:32 AM

 
Samuel Smith
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/21/2004
  tami,
my neck is starting to hurt,or did my monitor fall over?
sam


To love this comment, log in above
10/13/2006 8:11:44 PM

 
Samuel Smith
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/21/2004
  oh I forgot,that's hilarious.


To love this comment, log in above
10/13/2006 8:13:06 PM

 
Tami Rook
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/26/2006
  LOL Sorry Sam, just wanted to see who might notice LMAO... ok no no can I turn it after it has been uploaded?


To love this comment, log in above
10/15/2006 7:24:41 AM

 
Log in to respond or ask your own question.