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Photography Question 
Likah Rue
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/9/2005
 

How to Correctly Expose2 different White Balances?


 
 
I am coming across this problem more and more. There a puddle in the road showing the reflection of the clouds and sky and there's the sky in the background. Each are different white balances and exposures, how can I expose them both correctly without compromising? Same problem with a beautiful sunset with a field of hay in the foreground, expose the sun, and the hay is dark. And exposing the hay overexposes the sun.


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10/6/2006 8:51:08 AM

 
Jagadeesh Andrew Owens   Are you shooting raw?


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10/6/2006 8:58:45 AM

 
Likah Rue
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/9/2005
  No, these are large jpegs.


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10/6/2006 9:07:26 AM

 
Jagadeesh Andrew Owens   Can you shoot raw?


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10/6/2006 9:08:18 AM

 
Likah Rue
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/9/2005
  Yes, I can.


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10/6/2006 9:09:29 AM

 
Jagadeesh Andrew Owens   Ok. So shoot raw and then do a "Merge to HDR" in PSCS2. If you don't have that, then make a copy of your raw file so that you have two. Then, open up the first copy and adjust for the actual sky. Then, open the other one and adjust for the sky's reflection in the puddle. After that, open both and drag one image over to the other so they are layers in one file. Whatever your top layer is, add a mask. Paint over the areas you don't want to show with a black, very soft brush (on the mask)exposing the correctly exposed puddle or sky on the bottom-most layer. So, if the layer on top has been exposed correctly for the puddle reflection, mask that layer and then with the brush I mentioned, mask out all the image except for the puddle. It takes some practice, but once you get it, you've got a great new method under your belt.


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10/6/2006 9:14:29 AM

 
Likah Rue
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/9/2005
  Wow~ thanks so much. It looks like you're a PS expert by the artwork on your site.
So there is no way to expose it correctly with the camera in your hands?
Thanks for the input.


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10/6/2006 9:17:21 AM

 
Jagadeesh Andrew Owens   Not that I now of. The D100 can't do multiple exposures in camera, and that's the only way I can think of. Wait - you could do it if you invested in a Graduated Neutral Density filter.


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10/6/2006 9:21:19 AM

 
Likah Rue
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/9/2005
  Wow, what is that? and how would that help?


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10/6/2006 9:24:05 AM

 
Kerry L. Walker   "Are you shooting raw?"

Last time I shot in the raw was on a beach. People keep pushing me into the water. They thought Moby Dick (the great white whale) had been beached.


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10/6/2006 9:26:37 AM

 
Jagadeesh Andrew Owens   Do a google on "Graduated Neutral Density filter" and you'll see. I'd rather you see it than try to explain, because you'll understand immediately when you see.

LOL @ Kerry!!! I'm glad I thought about that GND and put it in so you analog guys couldn't show me up!!!


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10/6/2006 9:29:24 AM

 
Likah Rue
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/9/2005
  Yeah, I thought it might get a little compex there. I'll google for it. Thanks for the imput. I really appreciate it.


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10/6/2006 9:33:53 AM

 
Kerry L. Walker   Don't think a GND would have helped too much, not with the trees splitting the horizon. A polarizer might have helped a little.


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10/6/2006 9:37:31 AM

 
Jagadeesh Andrew Owens   In comparison, it actually looks like she used a circpol on the bottom one. She'd still have to use a mask to bring detail back in post production. (Or dodge the non-sky/puddle areas if it were a wet darkroom). You think?


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10/6/2006 9:42:19 AM

 
Kerry L. Walker   With the loss of detail in the bottom one, due to the bottom half being unexposed, I see no evidence of a polarizer. The sky does look like it though. Your suggestion on how to fix this is a good one. Or, she could have used a roll of film and taken advantage of the greater latitude. LOL


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10/6/2006 10:11:05 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Print film. Slide film would have the same problem. Because print film, any goof ball can come close to getting a picture looking correctly exposed.
And she dosen't have to use raw. Jpeps will work just fine.


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10/6/2006 4:10:49 PM

 
Likah Rue
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/9/2005
  What grade of Neutral Density Filter should I get. They sell .03, .06, & .09? Is there a a best?
Thanks again guys.


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10/9/2006 3:40:44 PM

 
Craig m. Zacarelli
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/3/2005
  it all depends on you, will a 2 stop be good enough? or will you need a four stop...lol fun choice, I got a 3 and some times its great, other times its not so great but it always helps...at least some.. but for what I paid for it (sing-ray) its gonna be my only one..lol


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10/11/2006 9:33:35 AM

 
Likah Rue
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/9/2005
  Thanks for writing Craig. Would you mind posting some pictures you used your filter with? Thank you!


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10/11/2006 1:16:34 PM

 
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