BetterPhoto Q&A
Category: New Questions

Photography Question 
Ewurama Hayford
 

beginner


hi all,
so, I finally got my rebel and I love it! IM JUST WONDERING, WHAT THINGS SHOULD I SHOOT TO GET GOOD PRACTICE. I TRY TAKING PIX OF STUFF AROUND THE HOUSE, BUT I DONT HAVE THE FANCY LENS ANSD LIGHT TO DO PORTRAITS , LANDSCAPES, MACRO AND SUCH. ANY BOKS WITH PRACTICE EXCERSISES I CAN READ?? ALSO, WHEN SHD I THINK OF GETTING A TELEPHOTO/FLASH/TRIPOD. HOW WILL A LENS LIKE THE CANON 70 -300 USM HELP MY SHOOTING? WHAT KIND OF THINGS WILL I BE ABLE TO DO WITH THAT LENS THAT I CANT DO WITH MY KIT LENS. THANK YOU!!!
EWURAMA


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2/13/2006 9:50:39 PM

 
Rebecca A. Steed
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/6/2005
  Welcome to BP Ewurama! I was in your position less than a year ago, a brand new camera person, and I learned so much through this community. Two great books to read are Bryan F. Peterson's 'Understanding Exposure' and 'Learning to See Creatively.' They have exercises in them. They used to be classes here, but Bryan has moved on to start his own Web site. Lack of equipment is no reason to not shoot great photos. Compensate with creativity and learn the basics about composition. I use natural light through a window or in the shade for my portraits.
On a last note, there are some great classes here, especially for beginners at a very reasonable price. It was worth the money.
Also, if you post some of your images in a forum and ask for critiques, people can help you by telling you what you are doing right and wrong.
A 70-300 is a telephoto lens that isolates the subject. if you photograph a lion at the zoo, although you are far away, the head of the lion will probably take up the entire viewfinder. The background will also be blurry giving all the attention to the lion. Hope this helps, let me know if you have questions.
Becky


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2/13/2006 10:49:57 PM

 
Glenn E. Urquhart
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/3/2006
  Hi Ewurama - First, you do not need any "fancy" lenses to take great photos. Experiment with different subjects, lighting conditions etc. Do not be afraid to make mistakes, because this is how you will learn what makes a good photo. For books, go to your local library which has a wealth of information for free. Concerning purchasing of other lenses, I would hold off spending any type of money. You will reach a point in your photography experiances, that you will know what new lens you need to expand your creativity.
Whatever you do have fun and enjoy! Cheers, Glenn.


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2/14/2006 3:42:02 AM

 
doug Nelson   Often the way light falls on a thing or scene is more important than the object itself. Think about this when you see photos that please you.

Don't waste time or money chasing lenses. Use a 50mm, as it may well be the best (and cheapest) lens available for your camera.


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2/14/2006 6:01:39 AM

 
Ewurama Hayford   thank you so much, guys, for the input!!!! can anyone recommend the best class to take here at better photo???


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2/14/2006 7:02:50 AM

 
Rebecca A. Steed
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/6/2005
  I recommend going to the courses link and sorting by skill level. There are many classes geared toward each skill level, from bare bones and getting started, to making money for advanced. I started with Understanding Exposure, but that is no longer available. However, there are several classes in that same genre that can teach you all you'd need to know to get on the fast track.
I completely agree w/ the others on this thread. I would wait a little to buy another lens. And as Doug said, the 50mm lens is great. I love my 50mm lens and use it plenty.


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2/14/2006 7:14:24 AM

 
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