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Photography Question 
Jane Holestine
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/26/2005
 

Digital cameras in very cold weather


I am going to be doing some all day snowmobiling in Yellowstone in February. Obviously, I want to have camera in tow.(Nikon D70) How do I protect it against the cold? Will keeping it in a backpack when not being used be enough? I need advice on this, please.


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1/28/2006 8:51:20 AM

 
Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/18/2000
  Keep the batteries warm. When not shooting, remove the batteries from the camera and keep them warm in an inside pocket. per p. 197 of the manual: Use a spare battery (or two) and exchange them as necessary. Once warmed, a cold battery may recover some of its charge.

The D70 is spec'd to operate in the temperature range of 0-40C (32-104F). At lower temperatures the LCD display is likely to get sluggish and fail. Not sure about other functions.


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1/28/2006 9:18:55 AM

 
George Anderson   Batteries are the main concern for digital cameras. If you can get a remote battery pack for the D70, this can really help in keeping the batteries warm. Try to avoid using power-hungry functions on the camera.

The other problem in extreme cold is CF cards. Climbers and other extreme cold enthusisasts regularly encounter error messages regarding cards and corruption of storage media, with occasional loss of images, so take a spare or two.

Film users also have problems with their storage media in that film becomes brittle and can break easily if not treated with care.

The ultimate in cold-weather cameras is still probably a full-mechanical 35mm SLR. Nikons of this type (F, F2, FM2n) hold the record for cold-weather performance, mostly due to very close tolerance design and friction-reducing bearings.


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1/28/2006 9:34:08 AM

 
Jane Holestine
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/26/2005
  Thank you both for your help.


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1/28/2006 9:49:56 AM

 
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