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Photography Question 
Shawnette L. Cardenas
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/21/2005
 

How to remove glowing eyes in pets?


I have several photos of dogs and cats that I have severe Glow and some are more than the pupil area. Any suggestions on how to fix these without getting a "painted" look.. Is there a one click option like there is for human red eye?

Please help! :)


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12/1/2005 12:46:02 PM

 
Donna K. Kilcher
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/5/2004
  I wish I could help, but will be watching for someone to let you know how.


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12/1/2005 3:37:29 PM

 
Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/4/2004
  Shawnette,
my son is here and he does all that type of thing if I ever get it and one time he stole eyes from another shot and now he says he once used the cloning tool to just add some black.
he says just steal some black color from another object in the picture or the nose of the dog and then magnify the eyes until you can add the color where needed.
I do hope this helps,
Debby


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12/1/2005 5:48:24 PM

 
Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/4/2004
 
 
 
oh and if your using studio lighting your less apt to get it if you are using softboxes or shooting the light through a white unbrella.


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12/1/2005 5:50:08 PM

 
Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/4/2004
 
 
  ready for my bath
ready for my bath
© Debby A. Tabb
Nikon D70 Digital ...
 
 
oh and if your using studio lighting your less apt to get it if you are using softboxes or shooting the light through a white unbrella.


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12/1/2005 5:51:14 PM

 
Shawnette L. Cardenas
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/21/2005
  Debbie, Thank you so much for your reply. I am currently trying to use that teqnique. Its frusterating because the photo with the good eye is looking in a different direction. Its close but Im having to spend a lot of time trying to make it look real. Im pretty new at using the software so hopefully I will get the hang of it and will do what I can to avoid the glowing eyes when taking the photos.. lessons learned.

Im suprised that the digital darkroom software programs do not have an easier fix... seems to me this is as common as red eye in humans..

Hopefully there will be a one click fix sooner rather than later :) ... I do appreciate your offering some help... :)


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12/2/2005 8:15:58 PM

 
Sharon  Day
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/27/2004
  What I do is select the eye and use the hue/saturation in Photoshop to change the color of the eye. That way you don't lose the catch lights or details but can make the color more natural looking.


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12/2/2005 9:35:27 PM

 
Peggy J. Sells
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/4/2004
peggysellsphotography.com
  Hi Shawnette,
I am currently taking a photoshop class with Lewis Kemper (fantastic class) and I had the same problem with the glowing eyes in some of my pet portraits. If you are familiar with photoshop here is what he said to try. "Peggy try this. Make Black the foreground color. Choose a brush and up in the tool options (at the top) set the Brush Blend Mode to Soft Light. Then make the brush the size of the pupils and paint.

Don't forget to put the Brush Blend Mode to Normal when you are done!

Let me know if that helped." It worked so well and looked very natural because you are not changing the shape just darkening up the glow. Hope this helps.


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12/3/2005 8:03:33 AM

 
Bill Merlavage
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/25/2005
  http://www.atncentral.com/download.htm#Editing - download the Demon-Eye removal action.


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12/3/2005 12:22:29 PM

 
Shawnette L. Cardenas
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/21/2005
  THANK YOU to everyone that reached out to help me.

It is just simply amazing that there isn't a "quick" fix to this common problem.

I struggled with the painting/brush techniques (Actually didn't get Bills message until today but I will try it when I get home)

My photos had to be repaired and sent to my friend over the weekend. What I ended up doing was cutting the good eyes from another photo and pasting/blending them into the one I wanted. It was a struggle but most of them came out GREAT. NOT easy, when you are learning the programs. I have several software programs including photoshop (need a class for that and I will look into the one you mentioned so THANKS for that tip as well!

When I get home, I will upload the before and after photos for you to check out.. I really appreciate your advice and look forward to more helpful hints. :)
Shawnette Cardenas


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12/5/2005 4:25:29 PM

 
Sharon  Day
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/27/2004
  I'm glad you resolved your problem, Shawnette. I tried Peggy's suggestion and that works great for me. Learn something new every day here!


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12/5/2005 4:46:34 PM

 
Aingeal M. Puirs   Bill ,
I downloaded the tool you provided a link for PS CS, where in Photoshop does the tool show up at? Thanks.


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12/23/2005 7:37:37 PM

 
Shawnette L. Cardenas
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/21/2005
  Boy time flys.. Christmas is now over and Ive finally checked my Email. Thanks again for all the replies to my issues and I promise to download my before and after pictures for you all to check out (hope to do that this week, but another Holiday around the corner may cause a delay)

Ive also started an online class for photoshop CS2 - Im learning a lot and thanks to that class and ALL of you...!My brain keeps getting bigger and bigger everyday!! ha ha


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12/28/2005 3:45:26 PM

 
Stan Lubach
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/1/2005
  Shawnette, just to add a little deeper understanding to this problem, the reason for the glowing eyes in animals is that their retinas are reflective to help the eyes collect light, and therefore give them better night vision. In humans, the flash is reflecting off the blood vessels in the retina. Red-eye reduction in cameras for human eyes uses pre-flashes to 'stop-down' the irises. This doesn't work with animals because the reflective properties of the eyes are different and, at least in the case of my cats, the iris return to full-open too quickly. The best way to avoid the problem at the camera is to not flash light directly at the eyes.


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12/28/2005 5:17:28 PM

 
Mary E. Heinz
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/23/2005
  Yes, I read that...not to use flash
with dogs...but the flash with the
cats seemed o.k...guess I used the
"indirect" flash ...method...


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11/20/2006 1:50:33 AM

 
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