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Photography Question 
Ellen Devenny
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/8/2004
 

water damaged lens


I'm asking this question on behalf of my son in law. While he was out
photographing waterfalls today, his camera bag which had a 75-300mm lens
and a camcorder, fell into the water. The camera bag was closed so the
contents remained inside. It took a while but he retrieved the bag after
falling in himself. Thankfully he is OK, but he concerned about how to
dry out his equipment. Can you advise me on what to tell him??????
Thanks for any help you can offer. And thank you for this incredible
website that has been one of the best learning tools for me!!! Ellen


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11/28/2005 3:57:13 PM

 
Brendan Knell
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/17/2005
  I'm sorry to say, but the camcorder is most likely history. If the lens is an older one(non-electronic), it may survive. Just letting it air dry would probably be the best, because the heat from a hair dryer, for example, probably wouldn't be very good on the camcorders electronics.


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11/28/2005 4:12:12 PM

 
Ellen Devenny
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/8/2004
  What about the 75-300 telephoto lens? It goes with his Canon DSLR. What are the chances of being able to use it again?


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11/28/2005 4:26:38 PM

 
Brendan Knell
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/17/2005
  Like I said, if it is an older one(non-electronic), then it should be ok. If it is a newer one, then some of the electronic features(maybe the autofocus for example) might not work. But the overall lens should still work. Unless, when it fell in, something broke. To check, you may be able to just look through the lens(without the camera), and if it looks ok it should work.


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11/28/2005 4:52:11 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Try over night in the oven at the lowest temp, 150-200. Worked for somebody who's camera went into a pond. Platics or rubberised parts like the grip on the barrel may need to be kept off of metal somehow.


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11/28/2005 6:54:19 PM

 
Brendan Knell
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/17/2005
  A hotpad might work to keep the plastic off the metal.


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11/28/2005 7:36:49 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  True that. Or baking dish filled with rice. Or sand. Lots of stuff.
There was an answer on the other thread about taking it to a shop, which of course makes sense, but a 75-300 really is cheap price wise, relatively, so eventhough that's an obvious choice, saving without doing that may be your best choice.
The price of taking the entire lens apart and cleaning, and taking the entire thing apart is what they'll do, may be more than a new lens.


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11/28/2005 8:04:43 PM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  Fresh water is not as damaging as salt water but you would definitely be wise to have them checked out by a professional.
Having worked in and around water a lot, I've suffered a few similar mis-haps and have come out OK.


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11/29/2005 12:59:30 AM

 
Craig m. Zacarelli
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/3/2005
  let them air dry in a warm dry place for about a week... dont rush it, water and electricity do not mix well... you have to remember, its hard for air to get into the lens barrel and the camcorders body so it will take some time for the moisture to get out too.
Craig-


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11/29/2005 9:54:02 AM

 
Will Turner   The 150-degree oven idea probably isn't too smart. There are rubber, plastic and synthetic components in most of today's electronic cameras that will deform or melt well short of 150 degrees. Certainly plastic aspheric lens elements can deform at such temperatures. Ovens or dry boxes (wood box with a electric lightbulb) that can be heated to only slightly warm and dehydrate the air, could serve as a useful dry box for several days to dry out the camcorder and lens if the batteries are removed, the lens and camera are partially disassembled and the camera hasn't already been powered on, which inevitably fries the electronics.

Repair techs always hate 'swimmers', in part because someone has usually activated the camera and fried the circuits, and even when they don't, the survival rate (full functionality) is less than 50%.


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11/29/2005 1:32:32 PM

 
Craig m. Zacarelli
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/3/2005
  smart answer will... why would anyone stick a lens or camera in the oven anyhow??
craig-


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11/29/2005 1:57:26 PM

 
Ellen Devenny
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/8/2004
  I don't think I would advise the oven at all..........

I appreciate all your replys and will pass this information on. Hopefully something will work.


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11/29/2005 2:51:46 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  I know it dosen't sound to good but it's what somebody did to dry out his point and shoot. Went in the water when he was doing some aeiral pictures with a kite.


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11/29/2005 8:19:03 PM

 
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