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Photography Question 
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BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/29/2005
 

How to Clean Lenses


I just cleaned my macro lens with anti-fog lens cleaner and a microfiber cloth. I cleaned it like I always do but this time it left streaks across the lens ... is there any way to remove them???


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11/17/2005 10:41:37 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Use lens cleaner to get spots/finger prints off. Fog it with your breath to get the lens cleaner streaks off. It's what I do. Independent lab testing proved it. Your results may vary.


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11/17/2005 10:49:07 AM

 
Michael H. Cothran   This is a subject for which I am very emphatic. I do not recommend any type of "micro" cloths or liquids to clean your lens. Back in the 1970s, I discovered some small chamois cloths available from Porter's Camera. I still use them to this day, and my lenses are as clean as possible. To my knowledge, Porter's still sells them.
Michael H. Cothran


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11/17/2005 10:57:27 AM

 
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BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/29/2005
  never heard of porters... I tried fogging it with my breath :-/


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11/17/2005 11:19:02 AM

 
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BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/29/2005
  no metter what I do... reclean it fog it. nothing if I wipe it the streaks just move they will not come off I jsut got the damn thing too wtff.


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11/17/2005 11:20:38 AM

 
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BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/29/2005
  oh and it's actually a filter.. so its not such a huge huge problem... but still its a 60 dollar filter and I have to wait ot get the money.

plus I dunno if you'd do something different for a filter or not.


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11/17/2005 11:32:02 AM

 
Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/18/2000
  Hoya coated/multicoated? These are notoriously hard to clean without streaking. The anti-fog cleaner actually leaves a film on the lens instead of wiping completely clean (hence the "anti-fog"). Multicoating tends to show this more than uncoated filters, so unless you see an effect in your photos, you've probably cleaned it good enough.
Generally, one cleans filters the same as a lens, though filter coatings tend not to be as hard or resilient as those on a lens and could be damaged/removed if one's cleaning method is too vigorous. I second/third the suggestion for fogging with breath and wiping with a very clean (or new/unused) cloth in circular motion, from center out. When cleaning the cleaning cloths (whether microfiber, chamois, or T-shirt), make sure final rinse is with clean, preferable filtered, water with no fabric softeners or scented rinses.


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11/17/2005 12:16:44 PM

 
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BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/29/2005
  woul dwindex mess it up more?


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11/17/2005 12:20:01 PM

 
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BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/29/2005
  this is the description of my filter

Haze(UV) filters are wise initial investments. They help protect your valuable investment from dust, moisture and scratches, which can lead to costly repairs. If desired they can be left on the lens at all times for protection. Haze filters provide additional benefits of correction for Ultraviolet(UV) light which can register on film and videotape as a bluish cast and can obscure distant details. Ultraviolet filters allow you to correct for the UV effect to varying degrees.

The UV-Haze filter is helpful when photographing mountain and marine scenes, where increased haze threatens to make your photographs indistinct in color and clarity. Nikon's integrated multicoating minimizes reflection at the filter surfaces which reduces flare and ghosting.


its a nikon


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11/17/2005 12:21:19 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Don't use Windex, or any house glass cleaner. Some lens cleaners streak less than others, like Zeiss. Used to get that at Wolf, until they got bought by Ritz. Now it's Ritz brand. I don't get lenses that dirty, so I've been able to make the Zeiss last a long time.
Anyway, use a new thing to get rid of the streaks, not the same you used to clean it. I'd put that in bold if I knew how. You can use white toilet paper if there's nothing else. More lint but still works. Just use white because of the dyes in colored paper.


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11/17/2005 2:01:56 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  I now know how to be BIG AND BOLD!!!


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11/17/2005 2:03:16 PM

 
Terry  R. Hatfield
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/4/2003
  When They Get That Bad Screw It Off The Lens And Use Warm Water And Joy On It, Works Great!Let It Air Dry And Then
Toss That Dirty Cloth Your Using And Get A New One For The Final Touch Up:-)


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11/17/2005 3:47:08 PM

 
Gary Riedel
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/22/2005
  Never, ever, ever, use toilet paper, paper towels, etc. They contain wood particles that will scratch glass everytime and will show in a very short period of time. That is why micro fabrics are more expensive. Use them! No windex or other harsh cleansers either.Breath is best.


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11/22/2005 8:38:13 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  must have tried using oak toilet paper.


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11/22/2005 5:11:06 PM

 
Gary Riedel
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/22/2005
  Very funny Gregory. If you would like to use that kind of paper on your lens, please do. With all the money you save, you could keep buying new lenses and/or filters.


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11/22/2005 5:27:34 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Wouldn't recommend all types of toilet paper, cause some are stiff. But with the soft stuff, never had a problem yet. But anything can be bad if you aren't gentle with it.


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11/22/2005 11:20:35 PM

 
Bryan Bailey   Hi guys. I don't really do forums but I have to say that Gary is 100% right about using toilet paper or any kind other than actual lens paper which doesn't really work well. I learned about toilet paper the hard way over a period of use on optics other than cameras. Over time the glass will develop very very tiny swirled scratches that in certain lighting can really screw the quality of your exposure.
Before wiping with ANYTHING, blow off any specs or remove them with static so they don't get ground in. If you have to remove heavy streaks or "stickies" use clean water and your finger tips. For routine cleaning, Spontex and 3M sell some superb microfibre cloths for far less than the cost of one cheap filter. Never be without your good cleaning cloth!


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11/23/2005 1:44:58 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Starting towonder how hard you're pushing down on your lens.


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11/23/2005 3:52:52 PM

 
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