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Photography Question 
Shon Kroff
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/21/2005
 

Pattern issues


 
 
I was hoping someone could help with this photo. Seems the tight pattern caused some issues with some colors and patterns. Is there a semi easy way to fix this and better yet an easy way to advoid it in the future?


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11/1/2005 5:46:01 AM

 
John Rhodes
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/24/2005
  Hi Shon, I'm not very sure of exactly what you are asking. It would be easier to offer a possible solution if you supplied the metadata (EXIF). What exposure mode? Aperture and shutter settings?

The background isn't a good choice considering the blond hair--blends into the background.

John


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11/1/2005 6:00:44 AM

 
Shon Kroff
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/21/2005
  The problem I am having is the mans shirt. I got some odd colors and patterns from it......


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11/1/2005 6:08:26 AM

 
Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/18/2000
  The effect is called moire. There are methods for correcting/removing it, but I'm not experienced enough to explain them. There seem to be lots of tutorials available if one Googles "correcting moire".


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11/1/2005 7:34:22 AM

 
Christopher A. Vedros
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/14/2005
  Have you tried printing the picture?

I've seen many cases where patterns like this will show up on the screen at certain magnifications, but don't show up in prints.


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11/1/2005 7:39:27 AM

 
Shon Kroff
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/21/2005
  I have not tried printing I was assuming that it would print as I saw it, if I zoom in to actual pixel size they are a different color and the pattern runs together. I will try it though. Luckily they are all family huh?


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11/1/2005 8:15:01 AM

 
Craig m. Zacarelli
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/3/2005
 
 
 
I have had this happen to me but I think it was during the sharpening phase... not sure though!
-zacker-


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11/1/2005 10:16:14 AM

 
Craig m. Zacarelli
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/3/2005
 
 
BetterPhoto.com Editor's Pick   old farmer
old farmer
canon 350D / Canon 50MM F/1.8 at The 2005 Big E in Springfield MA.
© Craig m. Zacarelli
Canon EOS Digital ...
 
 
I have had this happen to me but I think it was during the sharpening phase... not sure though!
-zacker-


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11/1/2005 10:17:15 AM

 
Justin B. Renshaw
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/27/2005
  Digital cameras have a tough time registering plads, and close stripes. They often blend the lines together. To avoid it in the future, reccomend solids to your clients.


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11/1/2005 1:30:48 PM

 
Melissa  L. Zavadil
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/26/2005
  I have seen this but only when the files have been condensed to a smaller version. The downsizing program gets confused in the process. Did this photo come out of the camera this way? The photo seems really over exposed and the lighting seems strange--maybe this has something to do with the condensing?? Not sure?


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11/1/2005 1:39:39 PM

 
Shon Kroff
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/21/2005
  Thanks Guys for the responces No down sizing has been done other than uploading but it was like that prior. Over exposure was an issue with this shot, but it was the easiest to view the problem. I think it must be the confusion of the camera on the tight patterns and lighting. some that are shot from further out look fine without flash. I was just hoping for a fix to the problem, and advoiding theses patterns sounds the best althouhg not always possible. Thanks again.


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11/3/2005 6:15:13 AM

 
Hans Scholte   If I remember correctly the raw converter from Raw Magic did some very good moire correction. They used to do a trial version, don't know if that still applies. You could look at http://www.rawmagick.com/CT.htm

Success


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11/5/2005 6:54:07 AM

 
Shon Kroff
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/21/2005
  Thank you Hans I will look into that.


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11/7/2005 8:46:34 AM

 
anonymous A.    A bit of research suggests that the D70 is prone to this effect and their are some specific solutions at http://www.outbackphoto.com/reviews/equipment/nikon_d70/Nikon_d70.html
I also had a quick look at the Paint Shop Pro filters: moire pattern removal is under EFFECTS/NOISE REMOVAL/MOIRE. Hope that helps.


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11/7/2005 1:25:17 PM

 
John G. Clifford Jr
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/18/2005
  As others have posted, this is called moire and is caused when the sensor in the camera is trying to resolve detail near it's limit. Because conventional (Bayer, or CFA) sensors actually guess at the color at each individual pixel, fine detail with differing colors often causes them to guess wrong and moire is what you end up with. Some CFA sensor-equipped cameras show less moire than others, but this is at the expense of fine detail.

The only digital cameras that don't suffer from this effect are those equipped with Foveon sensors which, unlike conventional sensors, read the actual color at each photosite location, the Sigma SD9 and SD10, and the Polaroid x530.

That's one reason why I decided on the SD10 over the D70 even though I've owned Nikon SLR gear since the 1980s.


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11/7/2005 2:06:24 PM

 
Pete H
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/9/2005
  Man! If that's moire', it is one of the worst examples I've seen. No offense intended.
The pants do not seem to be that tight in symetry of line proximity.
This appears to me to be more of a problem of PPI resolution.
What resolution did you up or downsize to?
I've forced my D-70 into some pretty nasty moire' situations, but have never seen it this bad. Hmm?

Pete


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11/7/2005 10:09:26 PM

 
anonymous A.    Quite right, John C. These moire artifacts occur when repeating patterns are laid over one another, and since CCD sensors are made up of a repeating pattern of photo cells that is like a similar pattern in the subject, such as a weave in a shirt, moire occur where the chip has to interpolate the data. However, in the Foveon CMOS chip each pixel sandwhich captures full color with minimal interpolation, so moire is practically eliminated. It also conforms to the 4:3 standard... But moire is a fairly minor problem, and it's not hard to fix, so there need to be a lot more compelling reasons to go to the Sigma over the competition.


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11/8/2005 1:02:54 AM

 
Craig m. Zacarelli
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/3/2005
  Pete, if you mean the farmers pants in my example, Im thinking its more a sharpening issue.. I have re- done the original and used a little less sharpening and they dont look as bad, although its still there but probably 2/3 s less. It was shot in RAW mode, the pic was cropped down in PS/CS2 to 4x6, 300DPI and all I did was adjust contrast/ brightness, hue/ saturation crop and sharpen. The newer version looks alot better, soon (when I get off my but) I will replace the version above with the nerew version,
Thanks.
Craig-


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11/8/2005 4:23:10 AM

 
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