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Photography Question 
Angie M. Nemanic
 

PHOTOGRAPHING SOMEONE'S PET


I just photographed a friend's pets, but I don't feel the photos turned out very well. I still shoot film and out of two rolls of film I only liked 12 shots. Not good odds.

First problem, one dog was running constantly never really would sit for a the photograph. I bascially tried to get the dog whenever it was still, but you can tell that's just what I did. The other dog was fine and I got good shots of him. Are there any tricks to taking a pet's photo especially when it won't sit still?

Technical question...I took the photos in the afternoon around 4 so the I used a flash fill to add a little pop to the photos whiched looked fine. Then as the sun was going down the dog looked fine but the background was pretty blown out. I typically shoot on manual but I'm wondering if I should have shot on program or even aperature or shutter priority. I shot most of the photos with a larger f-stop so I would blur the back ground so the dog would be the main attraction.

Also, if I'm sitting closer to the subject I risk losing a depth of field, right? Some shots seemed a little soft, so I'm wondering if I was sitting too close to my subject.

Anyway, any suggestion related to photographing pets would be helpful.

Thanks!!


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10/11/2005 5:57:24 PM

 
Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/4/2004
 
 
 
Angie,
I have experiance photographing pets and have written a Cd book on the subject -and here is what I suggest:
use a posing table or grooming table to pose the pet on, also use "holding props " such as baskets, slieghs, open pumkins, boxes , tubs ect. these are all holding props. you can place the pet inside an dgive them a slight feeling of containment.
also , someone from the animals family should be there next to the table to hold the pet-not call them or talk to them_that would be your job-but just be there for safetys sake.
then using things like a toy, car keys or last resort a treat to get eyes and ears to attention.
I do hope this helps,
here are a couple examples of holding props.


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10/11/2005 8:49:01 PM

 
Angie M. Nemanic   Your portraits are great. Actually, I prefer to photograph them outside, whether permitting. However, in photographing outside, I run the risk of the dog not cooperating even more.

Thanks for the information!!


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10/12/2005 6:29:58 AM

 
Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/4/2004
 
 
 
Table and suggested props still work out side as well as in.
We do a lot of pet stores and grooming shops-so what you see is a lot of indoor shots,ohhh- Greg will kill me but here is a quick shot taken of his princess outdoors


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10/12/2005 7:18:07 AM

 
Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/4/2004
 
 
 
Table and suggested props still work out side as well as in.
We do a lot of pet stores and grooming shops-so what you see is a lot of indoor shots,ohhh- Greg will kill me but here is a quick shot taken of his princess outdoors


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10/12/2005 7:18:50 AM

 
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