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Photography Question 
Suzanna Yun
 

canon 70-200mm f2.8L IS


Hello, I just got the 24-70mm L lens and wanted to get the 70-200mm f2.8L IS lens, but I am only 5'2" and wanted a lighter smaller lens without compromising the quality. I would use this for weddings and have to be able to carry it around for several hours. Any suggestions?


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4/5/2005 12:46:11 PM

 
Karma Wilson
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/27/2004
  Yikes, that's a tough one. To get a good fast zoom lens it really is just heavy! I have a 70-200 Sigma 2.8 and it's a huge beast and supposed to be lighter than the canon with IS (not by much). I can't think of any good solution. I'm 5' 7.5" and lift weights regularly and it's really very heavy for me to carry around. I think they make stabalizers that you can rig on yourself that help hold your lens/camera up and steady it. Maybe something like that would help? Also, a monopod can help support some of that weight and be a little easier to maneauver than a tripod in fast paced situations. Good luck,

Karma


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4/5/2005 1:08:15 PM

 
Suzanna Yun   hey thanks a lot, I may get a monopod I guess. =)


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4/5/2005 1:53:37 PM

 
Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/18/2000
  Smaller, and 1/2 the weight, and 1/3 the cost with no loss in optical quality is the EF 70-200 f/4L USM. If you feel you must have f/2.8, then other lighter with equal (or even better) optical quality alternatives include the EF 200 f/2.8L II USM, EF 135mm f/2L USM, and EF 135 f/2.8 Soft Focus.

In fact, if using an APS-C sized digital (D60/10D/20D or 300D/350D) then 135 is pretty much as long as one would typically need for weddings.


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4/5/2005 2:11:24 PM

 
Michael H. Cothran   Allow me to second Jon C. The f4 version has the same quality reputation as the 2.8, and as long as you don't need the faster f-stop, the f4 should do fine.
I would not recommend a third party lens like the Sigma, Tamron, etc if you do not want to compromise quality.
Be advised of this - quality lenses are seldom light weight, especially wide aperture lenses. So be prepared to develope your triceps and biceps if you want a fast, quality lens.
And I would forget about a monopod. It will help take the weight off your arms, but it will not contribute to any steadier holding. Monopods have never become popular simply because they don't do much.
Michael H. Cothran
www.mhcphoto.net


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4/5/2005 5:39:04 PM

 
Karma Wilson
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/27/2004
  Wait a minute! There are plenty of GOOD third party lenses. That blanket statement is not going unchallenged! You don't judge a lens by it's name because frankly there are plenty of awful Canon lenses! Every lens should be judged by that len's particular performance. You judge a lens by reading reviews, viewing samples and testing it on the lens. You DON'T judge it by seeing if it's white and it's name starts with a "c". Many Sigma EX lenses are benchmarked equal or better than L-glass. My Sigma EX 70-200 2.8 was recommended to me by professional photographers. It's sharp, contrasty and fast. I agree, some of Sigma's consumer grade is junk. But there is a good share of third party lenses that are excellent quality and produce fine images.

As for Monopods, they CAN make your shot steadier if you know how to use them, which most people don't. Anybody who thinks using a monopod is about placing the camera on and shooting it isn't bright. You need to use a monopod by steadying it against your feet and legs and getting your stance correct--essentially making yourself a tripod. And if you do it RIGHT you can save you between two and four stops. Monopods are very popular with particular photographers, sports and wildlife photographers come to mind. No, it's not great for macro work. But for wedding work with somebody who has a hard time supporting heavy equipment it could be helpful, especially if she takes the time to research and learn how to use it.

Karma


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4/5/2005 7:27:23 PM

 
Suzanna Yun   Hello again. Thank you all for your responses. I am in love with the sharpness that this lens produces and will probably test one out for a while to see if I can possibly manage a whole day shooting with it and not have aching arms the next day. I have looked at the reviews for the canon 70-200 f4 and they are not as good as the reviews for this particular lens. I think that my best bet is to work out my arms and triceps and buff up. =)

Hey Karma how heavy are your weights, I will try to out lift you. haha just kidding


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4/5/2005 9:53:51 PM

 
Karma Wilson
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/27/2004
  I think you're wise Suzanna. It's good to do your own investigating when buying a lens. That 2.8 aperture will come in handy during your low lighting at weddings. You can do it! If you find it's too much for you later you can try the F4.

I manage my Sigma okay (about the same size and weight as your L), but the monopod DOES help. Look up articles about how to use them properly if you get one. There is a method to it, just like anything else in photography.

I don't lift heavy weights, so I'm sure you can whip me! LOL

Karma


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4/5/2005 9:58:42 PM

 
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