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Photography Question 
Bobby  W. Curry
 

Using a Photo Backpack for Traveling


I going on a cruise soon, and I am thinking about purchasing a backpack to carry my equipment. I am looking at the Canon Deluxe backpack 200EG and the Lowepro Micro Trekker 200. I do not want to spend a lot of money for one because it is only going to be used for the trip. Currently, I own the Canon 10EG bag. Can anyone give me some input on a backpack, and does it really hold the equipment in place? Any input would be appreciated. Thanks!


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8/17/2004 11:34:07 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Yes. It feels better to walk around with a backpack instead of something over one shoulder. The Micro Trekker should have velcro and modules to adjust how you can arrange the compartments. Except why get something new if it's only going to be used once?


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8/17/2004 11:55:25 AM

 
Nancy Grace Chen
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/18/2004
  What equipment are you going to be carrying? I'd suggest looking into Tamrac bags also, especially since they've been generous enough to be a sponsor for this site. I use one of their hip bags for traveling (I just carry a telephoto lens and then a regular zoom lens with my Digital Rebel), and it works great.


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8/18/2004 7:47:36 AM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  Unless you plan to carry a lot of gear, you can get by with a standard day pack instead of investing in a photo back-pack. I bought one at an outdoor show ten years ago for $20, and still use it today. It holds all my gear, including a compact tripod. Also, it is less conspicuous to would-be thieves than something with "Canon" or "Lowepro" written on it ... an important consideration when traveling to distant lands.


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8/18/2004 9:54:21 AM

 
Steve McCroskey   Hi Bobby! I agree with Bob: The less noticeable your equipment is the safer you are! I have carried my equipment in a diaper bag at times ... who is going to steal a diaper bag?????


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8/18/2004 10:23:05 AM

 
Diane Dupuis
BetterPhoto Member Since: 12/27/2003
  Same here - no brand names on my bag!! I use a regular no-name backpack with one strap that goes diagonally from right shoulder to left hip. Inside it is my tripod and my smaller camera case (also no-name) which is safely snuggling my camera, batteries, filters, etc... Have a great trip!


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8/24/2004 3:39:07 AM

 
Dominick Soldano   Bobby,

I use an LL Bean Day Pack.

I purchased a number of padded lens cases that I put the lenses in before putting them in the bag. I also have some padded wraps for my camera bodies.

The great thing here is that the bag can also hold a water bladder with some ice cubes in a seperate compartment. This has the added benefit of keeping my equipment and film cool on hot days or if the bag is sitting in the sun. Plus it can hold a days worth of clothes, a rain slicker, and any other items that come in handy over the course of the day.

Dominick


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8/24/2004 6:00:23 AM

 
Norbert Maile   Hi there. I used to own a Lowe Pro Mini Treker. It was great, and held all my gear, BUT, it was not convienient. I suppose it would be good if you were going through the bush, but you have to take it off to get anything out. I would much rather have a fanny, or shoulder bag, and put the not so much used stuff in a suit case.


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8/24/2004 6:53:50 AM

 
Jennifer Ralston   I have this backpack and I really do like it. It is very well padded, both for your equipment and your shoulders & back. Yes, it does hold your stuff in place...and you can fit a lot of equipment in it. I have my dSLR, an external flash, and 4 lenses in it along with batteries, filters and manuals with plenty of room to spare!!! That said...I kinda wish I had looked into the ones I've seen where you can detatch part of the bag for use when you dont need/want all of your equipment. Currently, it's the only bag I have and it's pretty big if you just want your camera with you minus all the other toys.


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8/24/2004 8:52:07 AM

 
Clay Anderson   I recently picked up a Micro Trekker 200 as well, and absolutely love it. It is terrifically well-engineered, and perfectly fits all my gear, including a DSLR, film SLR, camcorder, flash, extra lens, chargers, batteries, and cables. It can get a little bulky, but when travelling, it's nice to have everything in one, organized, protected case that can be worn as a backpack. (Though the advice others have offered about avoiding theft is wise.) Additionally, I have an over-the-shoulder Lowepro case when I just want to carry one of my SLRs without all the gadgetry.


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8/24/2004 1:19:08 PM

 
Pat    I make my own backpacks for my gear. I get a book bag from a local store or second hand shop. Be sure and get a bag that zips all the way down. I cut up one of those thin foam mats used for camping. I have also used carpet underlay. I cover this with the fabric used for the inside of car roofs as this will attract velcro. I make a bin for the back pack the size of the inside and cover it with this fabric. I then make the dividers of the foam, cover it with the fabric but leave tabs at the ends and secure the hook sections of the velcro on here. You can tailor your dividers to suit your gear. This is a very cheap solution and the beauty of it is that it does not look like a camera bag. Who would want a to steal a shabby book bag!


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8/26/2004 8:49:27 AM

 
Andy 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/28/2002
  For the daily use camera, like Pat, I used a regular backpack and those foam mats to cut into any shape I need to protect my camera. However for traveling, I will use the camera bag. It really does protect your gears.


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8/27/2004 7:37:06 AM

 
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