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Photography Question 
Mary Iacofano
MARYIACOFANO.COM
 

Wedding Cruise: Any Tips?


Hello friends,
This is not a question on settings and exposure for this assignment, rather a question on any fun ideas. This is a wedding on a 100' yacht, under cover and on the deck. Do you have any suggestions for some different shots with the bride and groom? This is a very elegant but untraditional wedding.
I have the idea of the groom lifting (to appear that he is throwing) the bride overboard. This is not a professional shoot, just doing a favor for a friend.
I would welcome any ideas - no matter how crazy they may seem. It's all in fun.
Thanks in advance!


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4/2/2010 4:29:12 PM

 
Carlton Ward
BetterPhoto Member Since: 12/13/2005
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Hello Mary,
I did a wedding shoot on a large sailboat that posed real problems and also offered cool perspectives as well. There were ropes everywhere for the sails, etc., and I had to constantly be aware of where they were and positioned people to keep the ropes out of the frame as much as possible. I did still spend time in post production - cloning out some of the ropes.
While there were some open spaces on the bow and stern areas, it would often get very crowded, which would also cause problems positioning myself to get a good point of view of a larger group. I opted to get lots of smaller group photos and also got on top of the cabin to shoot down on everyone (still having to mind where the ropes were) but this worked pretty well. They timed the wedding for late afternoon, which also presented a few lighting challenges as the fill light I used for most of the day was now needed for full illumination as it grew darker. One of my favorite shots was after the ceremony. The bride and groom were on the stern with champagne glasses and kissing with the setting sun right behind them.
Work with positioning the bride and groom and the captain to maneuver the yacht where the sun is working to your advantage if possible. Luckily, the captain was really helpful and accommodating, and this made a HUGE difference in helping me to get better lighting.
So get up high and shoot down, and use that sun to create some beautiful images.
Have fun Mary...
Love in Light,
Carlton


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4/2/2010 10:43:12 PM

 
Carlton Ward
BetterPhoto Member Since: 12/13/2005
Contact Carlton
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  Hart 1
Hart 1
© Carlton Ward
carltonwardphoto.com
Canon EOS 5D Mark ...
 
  Hart 2
Hart 2
© Carlton Ward
carltonwardphoto.com
Canon EOS 40D Digi...
 
 
Here are a couple of photos that shows the high color contrast & ropes. These are before I did my final edit where I removed the ropes and lightened/softened the saturation & skin colors a bit.
The constantly changing background color as the sun was setting is very beautiful.
Carlton


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4/2/2010 10:50:05 PM

 
Mary Iacofano
MARYIACOFANO.COM
  Carlton,
Thank you so much. Great advice. Lots of challenges for me!


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4/2/2010 11:15:10 PM

 
Roy Blinston
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/4/2005
  A yacht on the ocean can give beautiful blue skies, or cloudy turbulent ones. Shooting from high, looking down is always a good approach (but not for everything). Do the opposite also (low to high) especially with masts and flag etc. Wide angle will also give you some drama. Use a polarizer for the day shots (best with strong blue sky), and if possible set your camera to under-expose by 1 f stop, but tell your flash to over expose by one f stop (with camera on manual settings that is) - and use a monopod but tilt your camera often for drama (ie: the horizon can be boring when it is always straight).


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4/27/2010 12:24:23 PM

 
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