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Jamie J. Lange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/27/2007
 

Color Correction on Outside Photos


 
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Canon EOS 5D Digit...
 
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I am having a problem with all of my images looking too blue after I take them on an outdoor setting. I am using a Canon 5D. I however do not know much about using a gray card and correcting before I take a bunch of photos ... therefore, I am decreasing blue and bringing back natural color tones one by one in Photoshop Elements. Help!


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11/11/2008 10:50:49 PM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  Set your white balance to Auto and see if that helps.


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11/11/2008 10:59:24 PM

 
Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/18/2000
  In the sample pic, the subject is outdoors, but in shade. The light in open shade or cloudy overcast is bluer (higher color temp) than direct sunlight. The 5D has separate WB settings for each of these conditions. Or you can simply set AUTO WB. Even so, the actual color temperature may not match that of the presets, so just correct in post-processing.


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11/12/2008 5:21:57 AM

 
john forrant
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/27/2008
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  You could also try shooting the image at several diffeent white balances and see which one you think is best


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11/18/2008 7:12:25 PM

 
Pete H
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/9/2005
  Jamie,

When the shot counts and you have the time such as in portraiture, manually white balance in the outdoor setting.

Some will argue if you shoot in RAW, you can adjust this later; agreed.
Why bother?..Get it right the 1st time and avoid that step.

Some are down right sticklers about WB, I am not one to cry or even notice if I am off by -1 or -2 mired.


Pete


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11/18/2008 7:25:47 PM

 
Jamie J. Lange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/27/2007
  Thanks so much to everyone! I found some infomation videos on white balance and Canon 5D on YouTube. It was so helpful because I want to get it right the first time instead of fixing every photo. Thanks again!


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11/18/2008 8:44:58 PM

 
Bunny Snow
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/16/2004
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  Whenever I can, I set Custom White Balance in my camera which is quintessential for saving time in the long run and creating good color.

Take an image using any mode. Often I start with AWB.

Next, place a gray card in the same lighting as your subject, filling the spot metering area with the gray card. That is, move the gray card either close to your lens, or move your lens close to the gray card. Remember, the card must be in the same lighting as your subject.

Take a picture of the gray card, switching to manual focus if you have problems with autofocusing.

Scroll down the menu and SET Custom White Balance in your camera. This will tell the camera that your subject is the gray card. Press the SET button again to confirm.

Next, scroll to the custom white balance setting on your camera. And press the SET button on the camera to confirm you decision.

This will remain active as long as the light remains the same for your subject.

The 2nd way, if you are shooting RAW, is to correct the color in Adobe Camera Raw. If you don't know how to work with ACR, Charlotte Lowrie has an excellent course: "Camera Raw From Capture to Finished Photo"

The 3rd way is to correct your image in Photoshop/Element...And, perhaps, you may need to do this as well as the other methods after you finish correcting and enhancing your image.

I'm currently taking:
Correct and Enhance Your Images with Richard Lynch, which is a very enlightening course.

Hope this helps.



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11/22/2008 11:44:52 PM

 
Bunny Snow
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/16/2004
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  BTW, If you want sharper images, use a sturdy tripod or have one where the camera lens is square over the center of the tripod. I also use a one gallon ballast of water, which makes a light weight carbon fiber tripod far more sturdy. ~Bunny


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11/22/2008 11:50:38 PM

 
Bunny Snow
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/16/2004
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  The gray card I use is the so-called 18% gray card available at larger photo stores, such as:
http://tinyurl.com/5uqfzt

It works for me in setting custom white balance.


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11/23/2008 10:57:50 AM

 
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