The weekly newsletter on the art of photography from
 
Monday, February 06, 2012
IN THIS ISSUE
Featured Gallery
Welcome Note
This Week's Tip
Updates From BetterPhoto
Q&A 1: How to Shoot Insi...


TESTIMONIAL OF THE WEEK
"This is by far the best Lightroom course I have experienced. Concise, up to the point, accurate without unneeded detail. Practical, wise and just great. Thank you!" -Katarzyna Lis, student in Rob Sheppard's A Darkroom Called Lightroom





THIS WEEK'S TIP
Photo Composition: Tilted Horizons
By Susan and Neil Silverman

If you are photographing water, a street, or a building, do try to make certain that your lines are truly perpendicular and straight across the image, if they are horizontal. This may seem like a small detail, but in the overall impact of an image, it is really important to have things level and straight, not tipped horizons or buildings.

If you are working on a tripod, it is much easier to pay attention to this, but it is equally important if you are hand holding the camera. The response to a photo of water, where the ocean "feels" as though it is running off the page in a tipped manner is not nearly as strong as an image where the ocean is straight across the scene. And working with buildings or walls that are straight should be photographed as straight as possible to create as much impact as you can. Now, if you want to tilt your image intentionally, then by all means go ahead. However, make sure that it is enough of a tilt that the viewer's response is one of knowing it was a creative decision on your part.

Everyone gets caught up in the moment and thinking of straight and level photos is not always something that comes to mind.



   
Featured Gallery
Mandarin Oriental
© - Janet Fikar

Welcome to the 563rd issue of SnapShot!
Hello,

Are you ready to take your photography up a notch? If so, you're ready to take advantage of one of BetterPhoto's outstanding online courses. And good news: Our next 4-week school session kicks off this Wednesday (Feb. 8th). See the school schedule... ... Here's how these online courses work: Each week, you receive an inspiring lesson and motivating assignment; then you get expert feedback, while interacting with pro instructor and classmates. Now, how cool is that?!? ... In this issue of SnapShot, don't miss these articles by BetterPhoto instructors: "Take Advantage of Raw Capture Mode" by Peter Burian, "Digital Camera Exposure: Taking Creative Control" by Lynne Eodice, and "Photo Composition: Tilted Horizons" by Susan and Neil Silverman. ... That's it for now. Have fun with your photography!    Kerry Drager    Newsletter Editor

Jim Miotke
Where Is Jim?

Updates From BetterPhoto

http://insights.betterphoto.com/2012/02/digital-camera-tip-take-advantage-of-raw-capture-mode-11.html If your camera provides Raw capture as an option, you'll want to use it for your most important photos. Read instructor Peter Burian's excellent on the subject. Aperture vs. Shutter Priority modes: Which should you choose? Instructor Lynne Eodice shares her expertise in this article. Check out the awesome Master Photographer Training Program!

Photo Q&A

1: How to Shoot Inside a Gym?
I have been asked to photograph cheerleaders (25 girls dancing during halftime)in a gym during basketball games. I am having problems with this low-light situation. I have a canon 60D with a 17mm-55mm lens as well as a 85mm prime. I tried shooting in manual, f1.8 1/250 at 3200 ISO. The images were very grainy. I switched lenses to the 17mm-55mm and the same thing happened. I was told I should be using a 70mm-200mm instead.
I also have to shoot group "prom" pictures outside with next to no light - again, a problem!
- Elizabeth WilmoreSee Sample Photo - cheerleaders


ANSWER 1:
The f1.8 prime is faster than the 70-200. But still, that's not the only issue. It's overall light. There is only so much for the lens opening to let in. By forcing the high shutter speed, ISO has to be high and noise is the result. You can clean up noise somewhat in programs like Lightroom.
Can you use flash - i.e., hotshoe mounted speedlight (not built-in)? Then you could operate at the camera's flash sync shutter speed (usually 1/250 or 1/200), using the F1.8 lens and ISO of 500 or so.
- Michael T. Cooper
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

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