The weekly newsletter on the art of photography from
 
Monday, March 28, 2011
IN THIS ISSUE
Featured Gallery
Welcome Note
This Week's Tip
Updates From BetterPhoto
Q&A 1: Best Lens for Gra...


TESTIMONIAL OF THE WEEK
"Paul Gero is a great teacher. He is sensitive to each student's needs and is willing to adjust accordingly. This course has helped to move me significantly up the learning curve for flash photography. ... I recommend this course and Paul Gero highly!" -Bill J. Brennan, student in Introduction to Your Canon Flash




GET CERTIFIED BY BETTERPHOTO!
Receive credit and credentials from the worldwide leader in online photography education! Learn about photography certification here...

HUGE SAVINGS: MVBP REWARDS!
BetterPhoto has a "frequent flier" program for courses! For every five online photo classes you take, you receive a 50% discount on your next course. Learn more about MVBP Rewards...
ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS IN SNAPSHOT
Get word of your product or service out to a rapidly growing list of over 102596 serious photographers.
Learn More...

THIS WEEK'S TIP
What about Vignetting?
By Susan and Neil Silverman
There are good and bad vignettes. Bad is when the filter or lens hood of the camera is in the frame of the image and there are dark hard edges in the photo. Good vignetting is accomplished by a photo editing program, and softly and gradually shades or darkens the edges of the photo. This is very subtle and holds the viewers eyes within the image and keeps the attention on the subject.
Oftentimes, we might suggest that this be done to an image, as it can be really a fine tuning to make an image all the stronger. It was a style often used with old portraits. A good vignette will not be detected by the viewer; but it will just be one of those finishing touches that very often makes a photo jump right out.
Editor's Note: For more details on BetterPhoto's expert instructor team, check out their Pro BetterPholio website.



   
Featured Gallery
Snowy Reflections
© - Ed Heaton

Welcome to the 518th issue of SnapShot!
Hello,

In a BetterPhoto online photography course, you'll have fun and learn a lot - without the expense of an on-location workshop! These visual adventures are affordable and fit right into your busy schedule. The next 4-week school session kicks off next week (April 6th), but if you enroll now, you can get started today! ... Too soon? Then check out our 8-week online photo classes, which launch on May 4th. ... In this issue of SnapShot, we have outstanding work by top BetterPhoto instructors: an article ("DSLR cameras: Do we need 5 frames per second or faster?") by Peter K. Burian, and a Photo Tip ("What about Vignetting?") by Susan and Neil Silverman. ... That's it for now. Have fun with your photography!    Kerry Drager   Newsletter Editor    Where is Jim Miotke? Follow BetterPhoto's founder and president on Twitter - BetterPhotoJim

Jim Miotke
Where Is Jim?

Updates From BetterPhoto

http://insights.betterphoto.com/2011/03/dslr-cameras-do-we-need-5-frames-per-second-or-faster.html There is real value in a DSLR's fast drive mode, says BetterPhoto instructor Peter K. Burian, "because it increases the odds of getting one photo that's perfect in all aspects." Read his excellent article on the subject! here are many awesome reasons to jump into a BetterPhoto online course. Check them out! As a Masterpiece member, you'll receive monthly assignments, private newsletters, and be eligible for rewards not offered with a basic membership. How cool is that!?!

Photo Q&A

1: Best Lens for Grand Canyon for Pans?
I'm planning on a trip to the Grand Canyon in August. I will bring my Canon 5DII, and I want to know what lens should I take for panoramas. I have a Canon 14-70mm wide angle, but I want to get a new wide angle - the Canon EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM Autofocus lens. I also have a 4L 70-200 with an extender that I could do panoramics with, then stitch. Any advice?
- Nancy Marie Ricketts
ANSWER 1:
Hi Nancy,
My first choice would be the Canon 14mm L lens but it is an expensive lens. The 16-35mm and the 24-70mm will also work well. More than the glass is the angles, time of day and where the shadows are falling. A tripod and using as much DOF as your lens allows are essential, and possibly a ND or circular polarizer may help as well. It's all about the light and as Ernst Haas once said - "The most important lens you have is your legs".
my .02,
- Carlton Ward
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

Answer this question:

Unsubscribe | Change Email Address | SnapShot Archives | Recommend to a Friend

If you use a Challenge-Response system for email, please make certain that you can receive our email by adding www.betterphoto.com to your Allow List.
The sender of this email is the BetterPhoto.comŽ, Inc., 16544 NE 79th St., Redmond, WA 98052

Copyright 2011 BetterPhoto.comŽ - All Rights Reserved.
No part of this newsletter may be copied or published without prior permission.
BetterPhoto is a trademark of BetterPhoto.comŽ, Inc.