The weekly newsletter on the art of photography from
 
Monday, March 21, 2011
IN THIS ISSUE
Featured Gallery
Welcome Note
This Week's Tip
Updates From BetterPhoto
Q&A 1: Concerning Nois...


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THIS WEEK'S TIP
The Best Subject Placement
By Susan and Neil Silverman
The more that the subject is NOT placed in the center or the "bull's eye" area of the photo, the stronger the image will be. It is really easy to have the subject in the center because most of the cameras have the focus sensor in the center. But if you press your shutter button halfway down to focus on your subject and then WITHOUT releasing the shutter button, move your composition to have your subject out of the center and then complete the pressing of the shutter, your subject will be focused and out of the center.
Placing your subject off-center adds more energy and dynamics to a photo. This is not to say that it should always be this way; there are times when having the subject in the center works the best. But to help liven up your images and create some diversity and energy, then it's usually best to go off-center.
Editor's Note: For more details on the Silvermans, check out their Pro BetterPholio website.




   
Featured Gallery

Welcome to the 517th issue of SnapShot!
Hello,

Great news! We have an exciting new 4-week online course: Pro Tips for Great Exposure. This class is designed for beginners and anyone else who would like a refresher course on the fundamentals of exposure. You’ll learn why it’s important to take control of your exposures, how to decipher your camera’s metering modes, and how to deal with challenging exposure situations. Enroll now and get started today with an early lesson! ... In this issue of SnapShot, BetterPhoto instructors BetterPhoto instructor Peter K. Burian shares his expertise ("DSLR cameras: Do you need to buy the newest model?"), as does our popular instructor team of Susan and Neil Silverman ("This Week's Tip: The Best Subject Placement"). ... That's it for now. Have fun with your photography!    Kerry Drager   Newsletter Editor    Where is Jim Miotke? Follow BetterPhoto's founder and president on Twitter - BetterPhotoJim

Jim Miotke
Where Is Jim?

Updates From BetterPhoto

Now here's a great question! And there's probably no one better to answer it than BetterPhoto instructor Peter K. Burian, a pro photographer who regularly tests and reviews cameras, lenses, etc. http://insights.betterphoto.com/2011/03/should-i-buy-the-very-latest-dslr-camera.html Treat yourself to an easy gift-buying experience, while also giving your favorite photographer something really special! Check out our very beautiful and motivating ebooks: Inspirations, Seascapes, and Cute Babies.

Photo Q&A

1: Concerning Noise with Canon 7D

Hello,
A year ago, I bought the Canon EOS 7D. In general, I'm happy with the performance, technical aspects of this camera. But I noticed also that this camera adds quite some "noise" , even under low ISO values, to my pictures. I shoot nearly 100 percent in RAW. I saw that quite a few people on BetterPhoto have a similar camera so I would like to hear from them if they have noticed similar problems.
Thank you for your input.
Alex
- alexander decoster

ANSWER 1:
I have read of the same problem. According to them, most of the noise is in the shadow area. It seems to happen more with the older non-L zoom lenses that the pictures are really underexposed.
The cure was to either purchase L lenses or add some exposure compensation. It seems to disappear at ISO 400 with the older lenses. Most of the complaints were with the 28-135mm lens. Something in the telemetry isn't quite correct for the older lenses.

- Lynn R. Powers

ANSWER 2:
Thank you. Indeed it seems more in the shadow areas, although not always. And even with a prime lens it can happen depending on the light conditions.
Alex

- alexander decoster

ANSWER 3:
Well, I tested the EOS 7D and certainly did not notice that problem, Alex. Of course I was using newer lenses.

Canon published this item recently about an Autofocus issue with some older lenses.

http://www.photographybay.com/2011/02/26/some-older-canon-lenses-have-af-limitations-with-7d-60d-50d-and-40d/

But that does not indicate any issues with digital noise. In fact, the EOS 7D is one of Canon's best cameras re: minimal digital noise.

Cheers! Peter www.peterkburian.com

- Peter K. Burian

See Peter Burian's Basic BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/mg.asp?id=69365

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Peter Burian:
4-Week Short Course: Mastering the Canon EOS Digital Rebels
Mastering the Digital Camera and Photography

ANSWER 4:
Hi Alex,
I cannot recall how many level options you have for high ISO Noise Reduction.
I would not use the highest level with any camera. The default level is ideal in my experience ... when shooting JPEG.
The higher the NR level you set the more blurring the processor will produce. That blurs the digital noise but it also blurs intricate detail.
Of course, if you shoot in RAW mode, you can set any desired Noise Reduction level later. Not sure which software you use, but Canon Photo Pro has an excellent, versatile Noise Reduction levels tool.
While watching the effect, you can set different NR levels and then stop when you find the one that provides the best effect: adequate smoothness but without much blurring of intricate detail.

- Peter K. Burian

See Peter Burian's Basic BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/mg.asp?id=69365

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Peter Burian:
4-Week Short Course: Mastering the Canon EOS Digital Rebels
Mastering the Digital Camera and Photography

ANSWER 5:
Peter,
Thanks for your further recommendations. I'm shooting in RAW mode most of the time. Would you disable noise reduction also in this case? We can apply noice reduction tools afterwards as you said. I process ( convert and some adjustments mainly) my photos in Lightroom 3. Indeed, the software that came with the canon camera is very good. But by looking again at some of the pictures with noise, I suppose it was more a question of underexposure and then the darker areas really show problems. But I cannot blame my 7D for that, only myself.
Alex


- alexander decoster

ANSWER 6:
When you use RAW mode, Alex, the camera records the settings you made (for Noise Reduction, Color Saturation, Sharpening level, etc. etc.). But it does not lock them in.
So, you can change them in the RAW converter software. Hence it does not matter what noise reduction level you set in-camera for a RAW capture since you can change that in Lightroom or the Canon software. (Unless you shoot RAW+JPEG; in that case, the camera settings ARE locked-in for the JPEG photo only.
I prefer the Canon Photo Pro software for RAW files that need tweaking re Noise Reduction but otherwise Lightroom is fine too.
Yes, if you underexpose - and then lighten up the photos in software - the digital noise will be more problematic.
Any camera sometimes underexposes. If you check a photo after taking it, and it is too dark, set +1 exposure compensation and take the shot again. (Then set it back to zero)
Even if shooting RAW it is best to get the exposure close to accurate in the camera.
Cheers! Peter www.peterkburian.com

- Peter K. Burian

See Peter Burian's Basic BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/mg.asp?id=69365

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Peter Burian:
4-Week Short Course: Mastering the Canon EOS Digital Rebels
Mastering the Digital Camera and Photography
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

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