The weekly newsletter on the art of photography from
 
Monday, January 03, 2011
IN THIS ISSUE
Featured Gallery
Welcome Note
This Week's Tip
Updates From BetterPhoto
Q&A 1: Protective Filt...
Q&A 2: Downloading Pho...


TESTIMONIAL OF THE WEEK
"Well-written and clear lessons, exciting assignments, excellent interaction in the forum, and a fantastic teacher. ... I cannot ask more from a course!" -Sigrun Gudjonsdottir, student in Introduction to Your Canon Flash with Paul Gero


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THIS WEEK'S TIP
A Formula for Classic Travel Images
By Jim Zuckerman
The way you can guarantee that you'll get great shots of people when you travel is to set up shots. I do this on all my photo tours for my group. I preconceive the type of image I want (like a model in an arched window, for example), and then I talk to local people about the best way to set it up.
Serendipity is great, and when you are lucky enough to get awesome shots by happenstance it's a wonderful experience. This doesn't happen often, of course, and therefore I make things happen with a little persistence and a preconceived notion of what I want.


   
Featured Gallery
Melbourne Lights at Sunset on the Yarra River
© - Linda  D. Lester

Welcome to the 506th issue of SnapShot!
Hello,

Best wishes for an outstanding new year! Make 2011 a photographic year to remember by enrolling in one of BetterPhoto's online courses! Each class is focused on teaching you how to improve your understanding of photography or Photoshop through exciting weekly assignments and helpful critiques by top pros. You must act fast, though, since classes start Wednesday, and many courses are starting to fill! See our school schedule... ... In this issue of SnapShot, don't miss Jim Zuckerman's Photo Tip ("A Formula for Classic Travel Images") and Deborah Sandidge's Featured Blog ("Look, Think, and Shoot").   That's it for now. Have fun with your photography!    Kerry Drager   Newsletter Editor    Where is Jim Miotke? Follow BetterPhoto's founder and president on Twitter - BetterPhotoJim

Jim Miotke
Where Is Jim?

Updates From BetterPhoto

How to shoot like a pro? In Jim Miotke's blog, BetterPhoto instructor Deborah Sandidge shares her look-think-shoot strategy for creative digital photography! Want to start using your new camera to make great digital photos? Our 4-week courses are filled with information and inspiration, are fully interactive, and are priced just right. See our entire 4-week school schedule... Take your photography or Photoshop to the next level! Our outstanding 8-week online photo courses return this Wednesday (Jan. 5th)...

Photo Q&A

1: Protective Filters for Lenses?

Should we place filters onto new lenses to protect glass? If so, which ones are most recommended? I have a new Canon 100-400 lens. Several are listed, what would fellow BetterPhoto users suggest for the one above??
Thank U so much...
- Leslie Steinkraus

ANSWER 1:
This is a Canon Vs. Nikon question in that the answer lies in two strongly opinionated camps. I do use protective filters except when the lens already has a protector plate built in to it. The Canon 100-400mm lens may have one so check it out. If I put any filter on a camera, it has to do something beside protect the lens. That eliminates the clear glass filters and the UV filters, since the camera sensor is built to eliminate UV. Instead, the skylight filter is used because it helps a LITTLE with colors in the shade or in a cloud shadow.
The other filters to own are a good circular polarizing filter, as well as neutral density and graduated neutral Density filters. Insure that you purchase filters with multiple coatings. I use B+W without problems.
If you are using a protective filter, take it off the lens when adding any others. Always use a lens hood. When using a polarizer, substitute the hard lens hood with a screw-in rubber lens hood. In this way, you will still be able to adjust the polarizer no matter where the sun is located without having to take off and remount the hard hood.

- Lynn R. Powers

ANSWER 2:
Hello Leslie,
I look at it this way, I spent a lot of $$ for my 100-400mm lens and I don't want to put another optic in front of it unless it adds something I want (ND/Circular polarizer filters). If you do decide to get a "protective" filter, get one of high quality and like Lynn - B+W are my favorites, but the Singh Rays are also tempting although they are very expensive. You don't want to degrade your image quality with an inferior filter so read reviews before buying. My 77mm B+W Circular Polarizer was $175 but I think it is worth it.
I keep my lens hood or lens cap on all the time until I am ready to shoot, but I did see a Nikon shooter drop an expensive Nikkor lens and the UV filter got busted up but the lens was not damaged, so there are valid arguments either way.
Most of my photographer friends, along with myself, don't use protective filters.
my .02,
Carlton
Here's a pic with my 100-400 and NO filter :)

- Carlton WardSee Sample Photo - Parrot
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=10990239



ANSWER 3:
Hey thanks to both of you for your valuable input. I do agree after some additional research that the IQ would only suffer w/a filter. So Carlton, I'll do the same. By the way, I always appreciate your more than 2-cents worth.
And I couldn't be more thrilled to finally own this marvelous lens!
Cheers to a brand New Year.....

- Leslie Steinkraus

ANSWER 4:
Leslie,

I would like to suggest that you keep a filter in your bag. It will come in handy on rainy days, during the spring when you can see the pollen in the air, at the beach where there is blowing sand or anytime the wind is blowing more than a breeze. It is amazing what can get past a lens hood even on a 200mm zoom.
Happy New Year.

- Lynn R. Powers
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

Answer this question:



2: Downloading Photos from Camera

I have a Canon 7d and I am using an 8gb extreme Sandisk card. When I download my pictures to my computer, not all of them download. An error message asks if I want to try again, skip, or skip all errors. If I tell it to try again, sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't. Then sometimes it gives me a blank or an error saying you can't view the image. Any ideas? I am losing some good pics. BTW, you can see them on the camera.
- karen moore

ANSWER 1:
Are you shooting just Raw, just JPEG, or both on the same chip? Are you using a PC or a Mac? Are you using Canon's EOS software to transfer the files, or some other method?

- Christopher J. Budny

ANSWER 2:
On this particular chip, I am shooting only JPEG. I am using a PC and downloading, I believ,e with Windows. After I sent this yesterday, I took the card out of my camera and used a card reader. All of my pictures transferred then so I definitely don't understand. Any suggestions?

- karen moore

ANSWER 3:
I would try using Canon's included software ("EOS Utility") - you can set it to launch whenever the camera is connected to the PC - it will open a window of all the images (thumbnails) on the chip. You can select them all, tell it to transfer to a specific directly, and it will move them all onto the PC. I'd try that, rather than just trying Windows functionality... But it seems if your chip reader is working to move them all, then Windows functionality should work to move them. Weird!

- Christopher J. Budny

ANSWER 4:
Always use a card reader. They download faster and it is safer. If your camera's battery runs out of juice, you may lose all of the photos that were downloaded. After the card reader has finished its job, insure that the files are on your computer. When that is done, reformat the card in your camera and not by using the computer.
As Christopher said, "use the Canon software." If I am using three different camera models, I will have all three camera utilities in my computer. That is for insurance.

- Lynn R. Powers
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

Answer this question:

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