The weekly newsletter on the art of photography from
 
Monday, February 18, 2008
IN THIS ISSUE
Featured Gallery
Welcome Note
This Week's Tip
Updates From BetterPhoto
Q&A 1: Vertical Shots Us...
Q&A 2: Calibrating Camer...
Q&A 3: Shooting Modes...
Q&A 4: Worth Investing i...
Q&A 5: Formatting Digita...


TESTIMONIAL OF THE WEEK
"Tony Sweet is a master, a visionary and an inspiring mentor ... If you want to learn how to shoot flowers, but at the same time, discover your own creative vision, take this course, or do what I did and take all of his classes ... The rewards for me were unbelievable!!! -student in Fine Art Flower Photography with Tony Sweet






TURN YOUR PHOTOS INTO BEAUTIFUL CARDS!
Photographer's Edge features a complete line of do-it-yourself Photo Frame Greeting Cards for all types of photographers and subjects. Visit Photographer's Edge...


WIN UP TO $1,000 IN CONTEST!
Check out BetterPhoto's exciting Cash Photo Contest! Enter today...



ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS IN SNAPSHOT
Get word of your product or service out to a rapidly growing list of over 68371 serious photographers.
Learn More...

THIS WEEK'S TIP
Take a Break from Image Editing ... by Richard Lynch
There are times in editing your images that you will know the image could be better, but you just aren't getting it right. Certainly you'll want to be sure you are using the right tools for the right job and applying layered corrections so you can adjust your corrections optimally. Get help when you need it by asking questions - and where better to do that than the helpful BetterPhoto.com Forum or classes!
But assuming you are using the right tools and you know what you want to accomplish, if you are getting a little frustrated, put the image aside and do something else for a while. Especially when you are working for fun, trying to work on an image without stopping through a frustrating correction is one way to make image editing a chore, rather than the exploration and joy that it can be. The best images were never made when someone was working on an image while they were frustrated and tired. After a break, you'll come back with new vigor, and likely you'll tackle that image problem!
Editor's Note: Learn more about Richard Lynch and his excellent Photoshop courses!


   
Featured Gallery
Sunrise In Bagan
© - Min Htike  Aung

Welcome to the 356th issue of SnapShot!
Hello,

Lots of excitement around BetterPhoto these days! Our awesome March lineup of online photography classes has just been posted. Check out the schedule and enroll today... And if you haven't read our BetterBlogs recently, you're in for a photographic treat. See Instructor Insights... In this issue of SnapShot, don't miss the WeeklyPhoto Tip on "Take a Break from Image Editing", information on the BetterPhoto mentoring program, and a fine collection of questions and answers. ... That's it for now. Have a great week of photography!

Jim Miotke
Where Is Jim?

Updates From BetterPhoto

Our awesome online photography courses give you personal interaction with successful professionals and published authors! Check out the March listings of 4-week and 8-week courses. With purchase in our awesome ClassTracks program, you receive a free Pro BetterPholio, and upon completion, you qualify for an additional free 4-week course! Learn more... BetterPhoto has teamed up with with Big Brothers Big Sisters! Our awesome BetterPhotoMentor program helps teens get involved with photography. And you can help - by donating a digital camera that you no longer use! Read the details...

Photo Q&A

1: Vertical Shots Using Flash
When shooting events indoors, I tilt the head of my SB-800 and use the built-in bounce card to achieve very effective lighting. But when I move to a vertical shot, horrible shadows are created. How should the flash head be positioned for verticals? Thanks!
- Shelley Toler
ANSWER 1:
There are a couple of ways to eliminate these shadows. First, you need to understand that when you shoot in the horizontal position, the flash is above the axis of the lens and the shadows fall behind the subject where you can't see them. When you go vertical, the flash rotates to the left (or right, depending on which way you turn the camera) of the axis of the lens so the shadows will fall to the opposite side of the flash. You can either rotate the flash head up and bounce it off the ceiling (if it is white and low enough) or get a rotating bracket which will allow you to rotate the flash (or camera, depending on which bracket you shoose) so the flash stays above the camera.
- Kerry L. Walker
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

Answer this question:



2: Calibrating Camera, Monitor and Lab
My Canon 5D is set at 5200K, but my lab told me to calibrate my monitor as daylight set at 5500K and my monitor calibration software only offers the choices of 5000K or 6500K as choices. Should I try to set all of my WB to the same number and where do I start? Also any suggestions on monitor calibration software? I use Spyder 2 Suite currently.
- Michele King
ANSWER 1:
Michele,
I'd go by the recommendations of the monitor manufacturer over the recommendations of the lab. I am not sure that their recommendations are correct. Is white balance on your camera always set to 5200?
Where you really need to start is with a broader understanding of what all these settings do and why they are important. If there were one right setting, everyone would have the same ones and there would be no choices.
Back up and start with monitor calibration using the tools you already have. Be sure to read the monitor's manual as well. I teach a whole course on color management - (From Monitor to Print: Photoshop Color Workflow) - so it isn't likely I would be able to answer all of your questions here satisfactorily, but calibration is a great place to start!

Richard Lynch

- Richard Lynch

See Richard Lynch's Premium BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/mg.asp?id=121428

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Richard Lynch:
4-Week Short Course: Photoshop 101: The Photoshop Essentials Primer
4-Week Short Course: From Monitor to Print: Photoshop Color Workflow
4-Week Short Course: Correct and Enhance Your Images
Leveraging Layers: Photoshop's Most Powerful Tool
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

Answer this question:



3: Shooting Modes
If I was taking a photo of a birds nest far up on a cliff in daylight with very long telephoto lens, which shooting mode would I be best to use. I want to get it with the bird in the nest so should I use Shutter Priority (Tv) so that I can use a fast enough shutter speed to capture movement? Or would I be better off using Aperture Priority (Av)?
- Joanne Kerse
ANSWER 1:
Either one will yield the same result if the exposure value is within the limits of your camera's meter. If you select aperture/priority and choose a wide open aperture (like f-4), the shutter speed your meter recommends will be the fastest your ISO setting will allow in whatever light is available.
I use manual settings 99% of the time but when I have used semi-auto, I prefer aperture/priority because DOF cannot be controlled. It is what it is at a given aperture ... and at a given distance away. I prefer to set that first, then apply whatever stabilizing techniques are required for the shutter speed that's recommended at my chosen f-stop.
- Bob Cammarata
ANSWER 2:
Bob is absolutely correct. I might add that each individual shooting style, scene and composition will dictate the route to take. You may or may not want a limited DOF etc... To say "I will only use Tv" places constrictions on you and often the camera's ability to comply.
All the best,
Pete
- Pete Herman
ANSWER 3:
Bob and Pete are correct. Also, with a "very long telephoto lens" you need to use a tripod to minimize camera shake. Have fun!

Editor's Note: For more info, check out BetterPhoto's online courses, such as: Wildlife Photography and Better Exposure: How to Meter Light.

- W. Smith
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

Answer this question:



4: Worth Investing in a Good Printer?
I'm an amateur, but I'm thinking about trying to sell some of my greeting cards and larger prints at local gift shops etc. I'm thinking of making the investment and wondered about others' opinion of the Epson Stylus Photo R2400 Printer and if it's worth it for an amateur.
- Karen Gifford
ANSWER 1:
While the convenience of having a printer on hand might be alluring, you may want to consider the alternatives: printing with a service. As Oliver says, I don't know that I'd print at home without proper calibration, and that is the beginning of the additional, hidden expense. Then there are the paper and ink expenses, plus paper cutter, mounting, etc., and the place to put all that extra stuff. Outsourcing may not be satisfying to a need for immediacy, but without it you have a whole additional dimension riding on your back...YOU are responsible for equipment maintenance, flubbed prints, materials and more.

Just the price of a printer like that will set you back what would be at least 100 8x10s on equipment printed on printers you would likely not afford for the home (I believe the printer I get most of my prints from was about $60,000 -- not that price alone makes for good prints). But you retain fewer options, and less access to other tangent services. I don't have a printer hooked up to my system, and I used to work in pre-press. My point: it has proven more convenient and less expensive to print via a service.

You still have to manage things on your end as far as good color practices, image correction and setup, but keeping up on printer maintenance, technology, upgrades, stock and more are all taken out of your hands when you outsource. It may be a consideration.

Richard Lynch

- Richard Lynch

See Richard Lynch's Premium BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/mg.asp?id=121428

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Richard Lynch:
4-Week Short Course: Photoshop 101: The Photoshop Essentials Primer
4-Week Short Course: From Monitor to Print: Photoshop Color Workflow
4-Week Short Course: Correct and Enhance Your Images
Leveraging Layers: Photoshop's Most Powerful Tool
ANSWER 2:
Karen,
I am an amateur as well, but routinely sell some of my photos. I have been using an Epson 2400 for about a year. I am very pleased with the quality of the prints. I calibrate my monitor with a Spyder II. If you plan on printing large volumes you should consider going to a printing service. I don't print large volumes and I like the convenience of being able to print at home. I also like the ability to fix any small problem I might see after printing. Small problems that are not noticeable on the monitor tend to jump out at you when printed at 13 x 19. I would hate to find that after I had spent the money at a printing service.
- Donald  R. Curry
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

Answer this question:



5: Formatting Digital File for Pro Lab to Print?
Hi,
I want to have a professional lab print my digital images. I own a Canon 5D and have it set to Raw, and Adobe RGB. I have Photoshop CS3 set to Adobe RGB 1998, and use 16Bit to bring them in to touch up. I save everything in TIFF. Should I just crop to the size I want and then save to a CD and take it in?
- Carolyn Withem
ANSWER 1:
Carolyn, ask the lab. Most likely, you should save as a large jpeg after all corrections are done in CS3. Also, check with the lab on color space. You should start with a calibrated monitor and not have the lab do any correction.

Yes, you do the crop - don't rely on someone else to decide how to crop your photo. You'll not like the results if you do.

John

- John Rhodes
ANSWER 2:
As John said, the lab should be best with their procedures, but I don't know that relying on them alone is the best method: knowing what to expect from color modes and such will end up empowering you to make good decisions. For example, generally you won't want to submit 16-bit information as it can't be printed. Depending on the printer type, it may be best to submit sRGB rather than AdobeRGB - the latter can be a detriment just as easily as an asset. I've a whole course about it (From Monitor to Print: Photoshop Color Workflow).
Making the best corrections to your images is always the best positioning for good results - as much or more than the color space you use (as long as you are using a proper workflow). Again, I've a few classes on correction: (Leveraging Layers: Photoshop's Most Powerful Tool and Correct and Enhance Your Images). Saving to a non-lossy format (flattened, tidied TIFF) may be slightly better than JPEG, which uses a lossy compression. Some services will allow FTP and other quick edits, like cropping, or fitting to a paper size which may save a few bucks when printing odd sizes. Depends on the service.
I always outsource, and consider it a better idea ... fewer headaches, better equipment, no maintenance.
- Richard Lynch

See Richard Lynch's Premium BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/mg.asp?id=121428

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Richard Lynch:
4-Week Short Course: Photoshop 101: The Photoshop Essentials Primer
4-Week Short Course: From Monitor to Print: Photoshop Color Workflow
4-Week Short Course: Correct and Enhance Your Images
Leveraging Layers: Photoshop's Most Powerful Tool
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

Answer this question:

Unsubscribe | Change Email Address | SnapShot Archives | Recommend to a Friend

If you use a Challenge-Response system for email, please make certain that you can receive our email by adding www.betterphoto.com to your Allow List.
The sender of this email is the BetterPhoto.comŽ, Inc., 16544 NE 79th St., Redmond, WA 98052

Copyright 2008 BetterPhoto.comŽ - All Rights Reserved.
No part of this newsletter may be copied or published without prior permission.
BetterPhoto is a trademark of BetterPhoto.comŽ, Inc.