The weekly newsletter on the art of photography from
 
Monday, July 02, 2007
IN THIS ISSUE
Featured Gallery
Welcome Note
This Week's Tip
Updates From BetterPhoto
Q&A 1: Landscape Photogr...
Q&A 2: Color Temperature...
Q&A 3: Prints: How Long ...
Q&A 4: Blurry Photo: Shu...
Q&A 5: Interview with Re...


TESTIMONIAL OF THE WEEK
"I loved this class. It has opened avenues of creativity that I was unaware I could do with my photography. The instructions were clear, concise, yet not so restrictive as to restrict our creativity and imagination. ... To me, the best recommendation and/or review I can make is to say that I am looking forward to another class by Jim Zuckerman!" -student in Making Masterpieces with Corel Painter





LEARN HOW TO MASTER EXPOSURE!
Learn everything there is to know about creating great exposures in Sean Arbabi's Exposure A to Z: The Ins and Outs to Metering online class!


OVERCOME YOUR FEARS AND PHOTOGRAPH PEOPLE!
Discover the joy of photographing people - especially strangers - in this new online class by Ibarionex Perello.


BP RADIO: TUNE IN FOR TIPS & INSIGHTS
BetterPhoto Radio is on the air - Fridays at 1 p.m. Pacific time. Listen to Jim Miotke interview BP's pro instructors and also BP members! Learn more...
ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS IN SNAPSHOT
Get word of your product or service out to a rapidly growing list of over 69050 serious photographers.
Learn More...

THIS WEEK'S TIP
The Seed of an Idea ... Or Working the Subject!
"I have found that I have subjects I return to again and again," wrote instructor and landscape master William Neill in a recent BetterBlog. For example, "I have an ongoing interest in photographing the salsify seeds that are found in my area...
While editing my images for various purposes, I often compare recent work with the best of past work on the same subject. Maybe I've already made my "best" image of these seed heads, but I still keep trying in hopes of making the ultimate one!
"This type of analysis is an important skill in editing your work. I have favorite images in Yosemite that took many years of returning for the right light, and of refining the composition in response to post-exposure assessments. The seeds for visual ideas sometimes take years to grow!
"Maybe this approach with help you too!"
Editor's Note: William Neill teaches two excellent online courses: Landscape Essentials and Portfolio Development.


   
Featured Gallery
The Big Bang
© - Laurence Saliba

Welcome to the 323rd issue of SnapShot!
Hello,

At BetterPhoto, there's a lot of excitement! Our next session of online photo courses will kick off this Wednesday (July 4th). And our Summer lineup is our best ever, with many new courses. Check out the school schedule... Get a head start! Enroll in a class today and, if you like, we will send you the first lesson before the July Fourth holiday! Just email bpsupport@betterphoto.com and request a pre-sent first lesson. ... Need help deciding? Our CourseFinder is easy to use and very helpful! ... In this issue of SnapShot, be sure to read instructor William Neill's Photo Tip, which addresses the always important issue of "working the subject", and our usual fine collection of questions and answers. ... Looking ahead: The 2007 BetterPhoto Conference promises to be an action-packed weekend of information and inspiration! The fun takes place September 29th and 30th in Chicago. ... That's it for now. Best wishes for a great week of photography!

Jim Miotke
Where Is Jim?

Updates From BetterPhoto

Enroll now in one of our interactive online classes! You'll learn photography or Photoshop through exciting weekly assignments and helpful critiques from professionals. Also, if you enroll in a course today and if you email a request to bpsupport@betterphoto.com, we will send you the first lesson before the July Fourth holiday! We've just added many exciting design options to further personalize the look of your Deluxe or Pro BetterPholio! Plus, our new monthly newsletter for BetterPholio owners is filled with tips and updates.Compare the options. We have many excellent ways to learn more about photography ... via Instructor Insights blogs and the Trip Planner guide.

How to Photograph Fireworks: Read instructor Charlotte's excellent Photo Tip in the June 26th SnapShot and also check out BP's A Celebration of Light and Color! article. And, for inspiration, review the Featured Gallery in this issue of SnapShot!

Photo Q&A

1: Landscape Photography: Advice Needed
I will be taking landscape-type photographs. I have a 24mm/f 2.8 lens for my Nikon F6, and I am a newbie to all photography! What would you suggest for the best settings/point of focus for landscapes with this lens?
- Mary C. Casey
ANSWER 1:
Get down low to the ground and critically focus onto something in the foreground ... like a group of flowers, an interesting rock formation, a cactus (or whatever) and compose this element into the lower third of the frame.
- A small aperture setting (like f-16) will expand your depth of field (the range of sharpness) from the foreground to the distant landscape.
- Make sure you "level" the angle of view you see through the viewfinder to avoid distorted (or tilted) trees and other objects on the sides of the frame.
- Also, if the sun is behind you, check carefully to make sure a part of your shadow isn't in the bottom of your composition.
I recently acquired a 20mm Nikkor lens and my landscape work has improved dramatically with its wider angle of perspective.
- Bob Cammarata
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

Answer this question:



2: Color Temperature Settings
Does anyone regularly use the manual color temperature settings (i.e., those measured in degrees of Kelvin)? It seems to be more precise than the presets, especially for night photography.
- Bernard Dee
ANSWER 1:
I don't. It's only precise if you know precisely what temperature you're trying to balance - and that's not likely.
I generally leave it set to Auto white balance, or switch to Tungsten if I'm shooting inside without flash. Most of the time, this works just fine for me.
I have found that White Balance is too easy to adjust in post-processing to waste much time on it while shooting. If I'm shooting something critical, I usually shoot in Raw anyway, making it even easier.
Chris A. Vedros
www.cavphotos.com
- Chris A. Vedros
ANSWER 2:
Most cameras only have preset color temperatures. You can get used to light types and make accurate guesses.
- Gregory La Grange
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

Answer this question:



3: Prints: How Long Do They Last? And What Care?
I would like to print some photos to hang in a room. What do I have to do to ensure they will not fade after a couple of years? What do I have to ask for at the printer to ensure I get what I want - a long lasting print? Thanks!
- Maria Zammit
ANSWER 1:
Hi Maria,
Traditional Photographs were made using light sensitive materials, such as silver halides. These are reactive chemicals that can be damaged by light and chemicals. I think you are unlikely to see any of Matthew Brady’s U.S. Civil War work on long-term display in a museum. I recently saw some Daguerreotypes at the Getty Museum here in Los Angeles. They were shown in a special room with controlled light. The worst light appears to be in the ultraviolet, but you couldn’t show images indefinitely under red bulbs either.
The basic situation for digital prints is if you use a printer that uses pigment inks the ink itself is more stable and less likely to react to outside chemicals. That helps a lot. Next, if the image is in a sealed frame behind glass, matted with museum-grade materials, things will be even better. You can use a glass that will filter out ultraviolet light, which will help more. Finally, sunlight is much more intense, and more blue than light from most other sources, so if you can keep sunlight away from the print, it will last longer. The other two big problems are water and heat: Try to avoid these. The print will last for years, maybe decades!
Thanks, John Siskin
- John H. Siskin

See John Siskin's Premium BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/mg.asp?id=158091

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with John Siskin:
Understanding Professional Lighting
4-Week Short Course: Framing and Mounting Your Photographs
4-Week Short Course: Introduction to Product Photography
4-Week Short Course: Portrait Lighting on Location and in the Studio
4-Week Short Course: Building Better Photographs with Strobes
ANSWER 2:
Thanks, John, for your help. I am now more confident to try out some enlargements. Can you help me with the sort of paper that is most likely to last longer, please, and what sort of printer is best. Are home-printed photos as good as those produced at a professional printer?
- Maria Zammit
ANSWER 3:
Hi Maria,
The three major printer manufacturers for photographers are HP, Epson and Canon. If you get one of the printers from these companies that uses their archival inks - for instance, Vivera from HP - and you use their recommended archival paper, then you should have a good outcome in terms of durability and quality. If you use ink or paper from a third party, there is no predicting how long the prints will last. If you get one of the 13X19 inch printers with the archival inks from one of these companies, expect to pay between $500 and $1000, and you can expect very fine prints.
Thanks, John
- John H. Siskin

See John Siskin's Premium BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/mg.asp?id=158091

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with John Siskin:
Understanding Professional Lighting
4-Week Short Course: Framing and Mounting Your Photographs
4-Week Short Course: Introduction to Product Photography
4-Week Short Course: Portrait Lighting on Location and in the Studio
4-Week Short Course: Building Better Photographs with Strobes
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

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4: Blurry Photo: Shutter Too Slow
I am just getting acquainted with a new Nikon D-80 and am experiencing problems in A (Aperture-priority) mode. Some photos I took of people indoors turned out very blurry, undoubtedly because the shutter took about 3-4 seconds to shut. I've tried adjusting the shutter speed but can't seem to find how. What am I doing wrong? Thanks.
- Kristine P
ANSWER 1:
A mode is Aperture-priority, which means you select the aperture (f/stop) and the camera selects the shutter speed. In order to increase the shutter speed, you need to select a wider aperture (smaller f/number). You can also increase your ISO setting if necessary. You might want to sit down with your camera and the manual that came with it and go through each section, trying out the settings on the camera as you go along.
Chris A. Vedros
www.cavphotos.com
- Chris A. Vedros
ANSWER 2:
If you were shooting indoors with flash, you have the flash mode set to Slow Sync. That mode will balance the ambient light (thus the slow shutter speed) with the flash just providing fill light. If you want a fast shutter speed and the flash to be the main light, take the "Slow" setting off (see pp. 40-42 of the D80 manual) and set the slowest speed desired in the custom settings (#24, p. 98).
- Jon Close
ANSWER 3:
Try putting it on Shutter Priority (S), and set it at 60 or 125 to syn with the flash. The camera will set the aperature accordingly. When using flash, you need to adjust the white balance also to give it the correct color balance.
- Sherry K. Adkins
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

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5: Interview with Renowned Photographer Art Wolfe
Hi Everyone,
Just a note that the second installment of the interview with widely published photographer Art Wolfe - conducted by BP's very own Jim Miotke - has just been published:

http://www.betterphoto.com/interviews/Photographer-wolfe2-A.asp

If you missed Part I, here it is: http://www.betterphoto.com/interviews/Photographer-wolfe-A.asp

Thanks, and have fun reading!
Kerry

- Kerry Drager

See Kerry Drager's Premium BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/mg.asp?id=20858

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Kerry Drager:
Creative Light and Composition
4-Week Short Course: Creative Close-ups
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

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